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HP tech event to empower teachers on how technology can develop the workforce of the future

Toni Hetherington, November 13, 2017 2:24PM Herald Sun

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Seeing how technology works in the classroom can open a world of new thinking for students. media_cameraSeeing how technology works in the classroom can open a world of new thinking for students.

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Teachers keen to prepare their students for hi-tech jobs of the future have a unique chance to tap into innovative teaching techniques this week.

HP is hosting a Melbourne workshop designed to provide connected learning experiences and empower teachers to develop our workforce of the future.

The three-and-a-half hour workshop will show teachers how to differentiate instructions and adapt to each student’s learning style while providing a truly modern education.

A student uses bananas and the Makey Makey to make music. media_cameraA student uses bananas and the Makey Makey to make music.

HP’s STEAM education consultant Gil Poznanski said introducing technology into the classroom can open up a world of opportunity for students — and teachers.

“By integrating future technology offerings available from computer companies like HP, teachers can start to build the classrooms of tomorrow by introducing technological answers to everyday classroom learning,” Mr Poznanski said.
“Utilising an Augmented Reality platform (such as the Sprout Pro) takes theoretical learning and transforms it into a practical session, with students directly integrating the computer hardware in a way that can answer the task at hand.

Coupled with specialised third-party hardware such as a Makey Makey board (which turns everyday objects such as bananas into touchpads the computer can read), students can quickly prototype a practical answer and integrate it into a digital realm, allowing others to replicate and learn from their work anywhere in the world.”

The HP Sprout computer lets a user scan and manipulate 3D objects on its touch-sensitive mat. media_cameraThe HP Sprout computer lets a user scan and manipulate 3D objects on its touch-sensitive mat.

He said creating these classes with the latest technology increases student engagement, creating an even learning field as the focus and integrating the work tools of the future into classrooms of today.

HP has limited seats still available for this workshop.

Date: Thursday, November 16 from 4.30pm to 8pm (refreshments provided).

HP Melbourne Experience Centre, Level 2, 234 Collins Street, Melbourne

For inquiries, contact: hpeduau@hp.com

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