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Video from the International Space Station reveals bubble trouble with zero gravity

Tamsin Rose, August 20, 2017 6:45PM Herald Sun

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Jack Fischer blowing bubbles on the International Space Station. Picture: Twitter media_cameraJack Fischer blowing bubbles on the International Space Station. Picture: Twitter

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A NASA astronaut on the International Space Station has shown everyone the messy fun to be had with a drink and a straw when you add zero-gravity into the mix.

Jack Fischer, who has been on the ISS orbiting* Earth since April, posted a Twitter video of himself blowing bubbles into fruit punch.

The beverage bubbles up around Fischer’s face before he bursts it into a mess of pink droplets that are quickly mopped up.

The mind-bending video was made possible by the lack of gravity in space.

Gravity on Earth would have caused the drink to drop straight to the ground, but in space it hasn’t been affected by the usual forces and instead formed a huge bubble around the astronaut’s head.

View from the ISS. Picture: AFP/NASA media_cameraView from the ISS. Picture: AFP/NASA

Mr Fischer said the space station was a great place to experiment with the forces that control the world around us.

“We’re going to look at one of the coolest parts of having experiments on the space station,” he said.

“Because we can separate one of the most dominant forces, gravity, on a lot of different models.”

Usually space explorers avoid spilling any liquids in space to minimise the risk of stray droplets damaging the expensive equipment.

They use specially designed tubes to drink without spilling a drop.

GLOSSARY

orbiting: going around

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CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

Activity 1. Procedure writing

Think of another experiment that you would love to see tried in space without the force of gravity.
Write a procedure setting out how to perform the experiment, making sure to include all of the materials and steps required to make it a success.

Extension:

Draw a simple picture for each of the steps in your experiment that shows how you think it would look when performed in space.

Time: allow 30 minutes to complete this activity

Curriculum links: English, Science

Activity 2. Gravity

Research gravity and explain what it is in just one paragraph.

Then write down as many things as you can think of that would be different on Earth if there was no gravity.


Extension:

Work with a partner to interview each other about gravity, giving your best scientific answers.

Time: allow 20 minutes to complete this activity

Curriculum links: English, Science

VCOP ACTIVITY
(Vocabulary, Connectives, Openers, Punctuation)

Spacey words

Choose between 10 and 15 words relating to space from the article.

Use the words in a short story. Work with a partner.

Extension:
Up-level your story by adding power openers.
These are words that end in ly or ing.

For example, silently and mysteriously

Time: allow 30 minutes to complete this activity

Curriculum links: English, Big Write, VCOP


EXTRA RESOURCES

NEED GIVES RISE TO SPACE BREAD

DOG SKYDIVES TO THE RESCUE

STUDENTS DEVELOP SPACE FACE CREAM

UBER WANTS TO FLY YOU TO SCHOOL

SLEEPING POD HOTEL OPENS IN OZ

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