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Science

CATANIA, ITALY FEBRUARY 21, 2021: Mount Etna erupts in Sicily sending plumes of ash and spewing lava into air - PHOTOGRAPH BY Marco Restivo / Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Marco Restivo/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Mount Etna’s spectacular volcanic eruption

geography

Mount Etna, Europe’s most active volcano, has awed even experienced volcanologists, pumping out spectacular displays of lava, ash and volcanic rocks for more than a week

This image provides a global "snapshot" of weather patterns across Mars. Here, bluish-white water ice clouds hang above the Tharsis volcanoes. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Make some noise Mars, we’re listening

space

A microphone on NASA’s Perseverance rover has recorded for the first time the sound of another planet. It’s hoped there will be more to hear from Mars soon as the rover gets to work

Aldabra Giant Tortoise Training Melbourne Zoo

Animals lend a helping hand at the zoo

animals

Melbourne Zoo’s oldest residents have shown no one’s ever too old to learn. Elephant Mek Kapah and tortoises Wilbur, Little John and Jean are all involved in their own health checks

Latest

Space capsule reveals its treasures in Aussie outback

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) mission images showing recovery of the re-entry space capsule following its landing near Woomera, South Australia on December 6, 2020. The capsule carrying samples from a distant asteroid (Ryugu) was dropped off by Japanese space probe Hayabusa-2. Some images show the heat shield, which has detached from the capsule on release of the parachute. The capsule had a soft landing in a bush. JAXA expedition’s photographer Anthony Gordon. Picture: Anthony Gordon for JAXA
space

Australia is set to play a bigger part in international space missions as scientists reveal the treasures collected from a Japanese capsule that returned to Earth near Woomera

NASA rover touches down on Mars

This NASA handout illustration obtained February 16, 2021 shows NASA’s Perseverance rover landing safely on Mars. - After a seven-month journey, NASA's Perseverance rover prepares to touch down on Mars on TFebruary 18, 2021 after first negotiating a risky landing procedure that will mark the start of its multi-year search for signs of ancient microbial life.The Mars 2020 mission, which set off late from Florida in late July, includes the largest ever vehicle to be dispatched to the Red Planet. (Photo by Handout / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA/JPL-Caltech/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

The Perseverance rover has successfully landed on Mars in its mission to look for signs of ancient life on the red planet

Koala teeth used to create archaeology map

Great Australian Wildlife Collection by Discovery channel. Koala bear eats leaves in tree. Phascolarctos cinereus. South Australia.
history

Australian archaeologists are studying ancient koala teeth and bones to create a map that will show how people and animals moved across the continent through history

Ditch digital for chalk, says learning expert

Coco, 6, write with chalk. Qld academic wants schools to get back teaching with chalk and slates. He says it's good for fine motor skills they are missing out on with screens. Picture: Tim Carrafa
technology

Primary school kids should ditch digital and return to using chalk and slates to help develop the brain, motor skills and the ability to construct a story, a leading education expert says

How does the coronavirus vaccine work?

Concept for the worldwide delivery of COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine by plane.
explainers

The first Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine doses have arrived in Australia and the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine now has approval to be used in Australia too. Kids News looks at how vaccines work

A billion years on Earth in 40 seconds

University of Adelaide Professor Alan Collins from the Tectonics & Earth Systems Research Group in the Department of Earth Sciences. Supplied.
geography

University of Adelaide scientists have released a video that, for the first time, shows the movement of the Earth’s tectonic plates over the past billion years

More girls to become STEM stars of the future

Secondary school students Hita Keshav, 15, Caitlyn Lewis, 17 and Emily Pham, 16 in the lab at Monash Science School. GIRLS are still underrepresented in STEM subjects despite major investments in recent years to boost pathways. It comes as Thursday marks the annual International Day of Women and Girls in Science. Female students at John Monash Science School, in Clayton, are celebrating the day by attending a virtual event hosted by the Royal Women's Hospital. More than 4000 students across Victoria will be involved in the event, which will see researchers and scientists give insights about their jobs. Picture: Jake Nowakowski
science

Despite still being outnumbered by males, more girls and women are starting careers in science than ever before, now making up 42.6 per cent of the workforce in STEM areas

Huge discovery of tiny chameleon

This undated handout photo released on February 5, 2021, by the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology (Zoologische Staatssammlung Munchen) shows the chameleon "Brookesia nana", identified as Earth's smallest known reptile, in Madagascar. - Scientists have identified Earth's smallest known reptile in Madagascar, warning at the same time that sustained destruction of forests the north of the island threatens its survival. Tiny enough to perch comfortably on a fingertip, the ultra-compact chameleon -- dubbed Brookesia nana -- has the same proportions and world-weary expression as its larger cousins around the world. A joint expedition in 2012 of German and Malagasy scientists did not know whether the two specimens they collected -- one female and one male -- were adults until much later, Frank Glaw, curator of herpetology at the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology, told AFP. The male's body -- about the size of a peanut -- was 13.5 millimetres long, with the tail adding another nine millimetres. The female measured 29 mm from its nose to the tip of its tail. (Photo by Frank GLAW / Zoologische Staatssammlung Munchen / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / BAVARIAN STATE COLLECTION OF ZOOLOGY (ZOOLOGISCHE STAATSSAMMLUNG MUNCHEN) / FRANK GLAW - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
animals

Scientists from Madagascar and Germany say a newly discovered species of chameleon that fits on a human fingertip is a contender for the title of world’s smallest reptile

Humans have made the oceans very noisy

The Queen Mary 2 (QM2) arrives at Port Everglades in Florida on her maiden voyage 26 Jan 2004, as tug boats shoot water cannons to celebrate her arrival. AFP picRobert/Sullivan cruise liner ship ships shipping
environment

With rumbling ships, hammering oil drills and other big noises, humans have completely altered the underwater soundscape, in some cases deafening or disorienting whales and other animals

How to tell if your dog is a genius

Funny portrait of cute smilling puppy dog border collie on couch. New lovely member of family little dog at home gazing and waiting. Pet care and animals concept
animals

An experiment that’s easy to try at home has shown “talented” dogs are able to learn the name of a new object after hearing it four times, an ability previously thought to be confined to humans

Clever solution to massive mask waste problem

A man wearing a face mask walks past a sign advertising masks in Melbourne on July 20, 2020. - Australia's second-biggest city will make it compulsory to wear a mask in public, authorities announced on July 19, as Melbourne steps up efforts to bring a coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by William WEST / AFP)
environment

Millions of disposable masks used and discarded during the pandemic could be recycled and enshrined forever into the country’s roads, Australian scientists have revealed

Scientists get to the bottom of wombat poo mystery

Baby Wombat. Coco's baby at Ballarat Wildlife Park. Coco, the 12-year-old common wombat is an exceptional mother, having just produced her third baby something very rare in captive wombats. The joey has just started exploring her new home at Ballarat Wildlife Park but never venturing too far from mum. Head curator, Julia Leonard, believes the little Joey is around 7 months old and is looking forward to baby spending more time out of the pouch. Proud parents Coco and Banjo. The park is having a naming competition for the joey and can be entered by going to www.wildlifepark.com.au
animals

The mystery behind wombats’ unique cube-shaped poo has been solved after an accidental discovery by scientists

Hanging out with Smudge at Antarctica

Antarctic expeditioner Matthew Williams and his mate Smudge the Emperor Penguin at the Auster rookery. Pictures: Matthew Williams and Guy Edgar
animals

A curious emperor penguin nicknamed Smudge has made friends with an Australian Antarctic expeditioner undertaking the annual penguin census at the Auster and Taylor rookeries

Dinosaur could be the biggest ever land animal

Handout picture released on January 20, 2021 by the CTyS-UNLaM Science Outreach Agency showing palaeontologists during an excavation in which 98 million-year-old fossils were found, at the Candeleros Formation in the Neuquen River Valley in southwest Argentina. - Scientists have unearthed massive, 98-million-year-old fossils in southwest Argentina they say may have belonged to the largest dinosaur ever discovered. Human-sized pieces of fossilized bone belonging to the giant sauropod appear to be 10-20 percent larger than those attributed to Patagotitan mayorum, the biggest dinosaur ever identified, according to a statement Wednesday from the National University of La Matanza's CTYS scientific agency. (Photo by JOSE LUIS CARBALLIDO / CTyS-UNLaM / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT AFP PHOTO / CTyS-UNLaM / JOSE LUIS CARBALLIDO - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS -DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
animals

Palaeontologists are digging up the massive 98-million-year-old fossilised skeleton of a titanosaur they now believe was the largest animal ever to walk on Earth

Guardian dogs saving bandicoots from extinction

Werribee Open Range Zoo
Guardian dog at Skipton release site. Lying in grass looking at camera with sheep in background
animals

Two very special dogs have a very special job as guardians of some critically endangered eastern barred bandicoots just released into a conservation reserve in western Victoria

Listen to the sounds and music of space

This NASA composite image received 22 August 2006, shows the galaxy cluster 1E 0657-56, also known as the |bullet cluster.| A huge collision between two clusters of galaxies has provided the first direct evidence of the existence of the universe's mysterious dark matter, researchers said 22 August.|This is the most energetic cosmic event, besides the Big Bang, which we know about,| said Maxim Markevitch of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This cluster was formed after the collision of two large clusters of galaxies, the most energetic event known in the universe since the Big Bang. Hot gas detected by Chandra in X-rays is seen as two pink clumps in the image and contains most of the |normal,| or b
space

You can now hear the sounds of space, according to a NASA project that has assigned musical notes and instruments to the goings-on of two supernovas and a colliding cluster of galaxies

Australian surgeons rebuild girl’s spine

HOLD FOR SATURDAY/SUNDAY HERALD SUN PIC DESK------ The Children First Foundation has brought Nichole Jamelo over from the Phillipines to have her spine operated on at Epworth Hospital in Richmond.    Nichole back at the retreat after surgery. .  Picture: Alex Coppel.
health

Standing straight and walking tall for the first time in her life, 11-year-old Nichole Jamelo can’t wait to take on the world now that two 90-degree bends in her spine have been straightened out

Asteroid sample lands safely in South Australia

This handout photograph taken and released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on December 6, 2020 shows recovery operations of the re-entry capsule, carrying samples collected from a distant asteroid after being dropped off by Japanese space probe Hayabusa-2, following its landing in South Australia. (Photo by Handout / JAXA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / JAXA" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

In a mission described as perfect, a capsule containing a sample of an asteroid that could help unlock some of the mysteries about life on Earth has landed in the South Australian outback

Great Barrier Reef spawning shown on TV

Acropora tenuis colony of coral spawning on Great Barrier Reef during first day of summer 01/12/96. 
Queensland / Travel
environment

In an Australian first, the annual Great Barrier Reef spawning has been shown live on TV in the hope the event will bring the country together in awe and inspire people to help protect the reef

Triceratops coming to live in Australia

Dr Erich Fitzgerald holding a 3D replica of the Triceratops mandible (jaw bone). Photographer - Benj
animals

A very special dinosaur that roamed Earth 67 million years ago is moving to Melbourne. The one-tonne triceratops skeleton has been described as one of the most complete dinosaur fossils ever found

Great Barrier Reef outlook now ‘critical’

TOPSHOT - This undated handout photo released on April 20, 2016 by XL Catlin Seaview Survey shows a turtle swimming over bleached coral at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef.  Australia's iconic Great Barrier Reef is suffering its worst coral bleaching ever recorded with 93 percent impacted, scientists said on April 20, 2016 as they revealed the phenomenon was also hitting the other side of the country. / AFP PHOTO / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY / STR / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - NO ARCHIVES
environment

Climate change is increasingly damaging UN World Heritage sites including the Great Barrier Reef, a new report warns, while 2020 is on track to be the second hottest year on record

Dinosaurs’ ferocious fight to the death

Duelling Dinosaurs
Picture: North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
animals

An Australian geologist is working to uncover the fossilised scene of a T-rex and a triceratops apparently locked in a ferocious duel, the teeth of the T-rex embedded in the other’s spine

Aussie telescope maps new atlas of the Universe

ASKAP telescope
space

In under two weeks the CSIRO’s world-leading radio telescope in Western Australia has created a Google Maps-like atlas or map of our Universe, in the meantime discovering many new galaxies

Rare baby earless dragons ready for visitors

One of the grasssland earless dragons at Melbourne Zoo. Picture: Zoos Victoria
animals

Keepers at Melbourne Zoo have proudly introduced to visitors some baby grassland earless dragons. It’s been 50 years since the last confirmed Victorian sighting of the species in the wild

Big idea kickstarts Grace’s future career

Young inventor Grace Howard who won a huge grant for her invention "kick me pedestrian button".Picture:Rob Leeson.
technology

A young inventor can now bring her idea to life after it caught the attention of some of Australia’s brightest minds and scored her a big cash prize to help make it happen

China launches mission to the Moon

A Long March 5 rocket carrying China's Chang'e-5 lunar probe launches from the Wenchang Space Center on China's southern Hainan Island on November 24, 2020, on a mission to bring back lunar rocks, the first attempt by any nation to retrieve samples from the moon in four decades. - China on Tuesday launched an unmanned spacecraft to bring back lunar rocks -- the first attempt by any nation to retrieve samples from the Moon in four decades. A Long March 5 rocket carrying the Chang'e-5 probe, named after the mythical Chinese moon goddess, blasted off from the Wenchang Space Center on the southern island province of Hainan at 4:30 am (2030 GMT Monday), the official Xinhua news agency reported. (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT
space

China has launched a spacecraft to collect rocks from the Moon for the first time in more than 40 years. It’s the country’s boldest space mission yet and could lead to a future crewed lunar landing

Census to count every koala in bid to save species

Archer the Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park. Picture: Dylan Robinson
animals

The Environment Minister unveiled a $2 million koala count as part of government’s commitment to protect the endangered species, while scientists call for threatened status for the platypus

Study using AI to make scents of history

Prof Matija Strlic smells a historical book in the National Archives of the Netherlands. Photograph: Matija Strlic
history

Scientists and historians will use AI to study and recreate what the world smelled like hundreds of years ago. Called Odeuropa, the pioneering study will build an online smell encyclopaedia

Like Superman: Aussies making diamonds in minutes

Xingshuo Huang with a sample of laboratory made diamond (Image: Jamie Kidston/ANU).
science

In nature, diamonds take billions of years, heat and pressure to form. Australian scientists have made diamonds at room temperature by squashing carbon with the weight of 640 elephants

First-ever Aussie sighting of bigfin squid

One of the Bigfin Squid found in the Great Australian Bight. The size of this squid coud not be determined due to poor visibilty. Picture: CSIRO
animals

Australian scientists have filmed five bigfin squid in the Great Australian Bight, the first time they’ve been seen in Australian waters. Little is known about these creatures of the deep

Time to wave goodbye to the peregrine chicks

The peregrine falcon chicks on November 12
animals

As Melburnians stretch their wings after the lockdown, the city’s famous peregrine falcon chicks are also stretching theirs, hopping and flying backwards and forwards along their home ledge

Meet your two-million-year-old ‘cousin’

Angi and Jesse with DNH 155. Picture: supplied
history

Australian researchers have found the skull of a big-toothed, small-brained ‘cousin’ of our species called Paranthropus robustus, which could help us understand human evolution

Vaccine maker ‘near ecstatic’ after study result

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: People walk by the Pfizer headquarters on November 9, 2020 in New York City. Pharmaceutical company Pfizer announced positive early results on its COVID-19 vaccine trial and has proven to be 90% effective in preventing infection of the virus.   David Dee Delgado/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
health

The Pfizer coronavirus vaccine has shown a 90 per cent effectiveness rate in tests, boosting global confidence. Australia last week ordered 10 million doses of this particular vaccine

Hyperloop rockets passengers in levitating pod

All aboard the Virgin Hyperloop, a pod or capsule that travels very fast through a tube using electromagnets. Picture: Virgin Hyperloop
technology

The world’s first passengers have ridden a futuristic high-speed transport system known as a hyperloop. The technology uses electromagnets to push pods through a tube at up to 1000kmh

Gene study finds two new glider species

MUST CREDIT WWF AND PHOTOGRAPHER. Greater glider in a patch of old growth forest south of Brisbane. The light greater glider and dark greater glider that are filmed separately sticking their heads out of the same hollow are a breeding pair. Picture: Josh Bowell
animals

Australian scientists have discovered two new species of one of our cutest and most-loved native animals, the greater glider. What we previously thought was one species is actually three

Asteroid could be Moon’s long-lost twin

Asteroid Vesta orbiting in the outer space as it passes through Mars. 3d render
space

A huge space rock hidden behind Mars could be a chunk of the Moon, broken off in a cosmic collision

Gigantic iceberg on collision course with island

Adolescent elephant seals are exceptionally engaging subjects. Elephant seals are found on many subantarctic islands such as South Georgia, as well as along parts of the Argentine coast. While the island supports limited vegetation and terrestrial life (75 percent of the island is under snow and ice), marine life is abundant.
environment

An iceberg the size of a small country is floating toward the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, raising fears seal and penguin parents won’t be able to access food or get back to their young

Astronomers find source of fast radio burst

This image from video animation provided by NASA in November 2020 depicts a powerful X-ray burst erupting from a magnetar – a supermagnetized version of a stellar remnant known as a neutron star. A radio burst detected April 28, 2020, occurred during a flare-up like this on a magnetar called SGR 1935. The radio signal was more powerful than any previously seen in our galaxy. The simultaneous X-ray and radio events implicate magnetars as a likely source of mysterious fast radio bursts observed from other galaxies. (Chris Smith (USRA)/NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center via AP)
space

Scientists — with the help of antennae made from actual cake tins — have solved the mystery of what causes fast radio bursts of energy that zip and zigzag through the universe

Mystery of the mass butterfly invasion

Butterflies A Caper White butterfly feeding on lantana flowers, Glasshouse Mountains,QLD
by Paul Francis,
Indooroopilly,
Mo 0400743885
animals

Hundreds of thousands of caper white butterflies have blown into Southeast Queensland in a phenomenon that only happens about every six to 10 years. Scientists can only speculate why

Study reveals benefits of all-girls schools

School girls cooperating while repairing mother board in the classroom. Focus is on arm.
humanities

Girls at single-sex schools outperform their peers at co-ed campuses, new research shows. There is less bullying and less skipping class and fewer friendship fights at single-sex schools

‘Bionic spine’ brings hope to people with disabilities

Melbourne researchers developing a "bionic spine" - effectively allowing a person to control robotic limbs through their thoughts. Royal Melbourne Hospital lead researchers Dr Tom Oxley and Dr Nick Opie are in the early stages of development.       Photo David Caird
science

Melbourne scientists and surgeons have given patients with disabilities the power to work computers with their mind in a world-first “bionic spine” breakthrough

Found! New reef taller than a skyscraper

geography

A new coral reef like an underwater mountain and taller than any building in Australia has been discovered in remote waters off Cape York, Queensland, its pinnacle about 40m below the surface

Gut bacteria could help control allergies, asthma

Yvonne Michaels and her two daughters (Giselle – 10 years old, Chloe – 7 years old) takes a holistic approach to managing her and their asthma.
Picture by Wayne Taylor 27th October 2020
health

There are positive signs in new research that hay fever, asthma, eczema and other allergies — which affect one in three Australians — could be controlled by improving your gut health

Plentiful water found on surface of Moon

(FILES) This file photo taken on December 14, 2016 shows a supermoon rising above central London.   According to recent studies published on July 24, 2017 in the magazine Nature Geoscience, the depth of the moon would be containing water.  / AFP PHOTO / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS
space

NASA has announced the discovery of surface water on the Moon in more places and in larger quantities than expected, providing drinking water and rocket fuel for future astronaut base camps

What is dyslexia? Is there a cure?

Composition with books on the table.
explainers

Dyslexia is the most common cause of reading, writing and spelling difficulties. But the good news is dyslexia is not a disease and you can have dyslexia and be really good at lots of things

NASA attempts to snatch asteroid rubble

An artist's impression of the Osiris-REX spacecraft near the asteroid Bennu.  CREDIT: NASA
space

UPDATED After almost two years circling the asteroid Bennu hundreds of millions of kilometres away, a NASA spacecraft has attempted to collect a sample from the treacherous, boulder-packed surface

Kurt the cloned horse kicking up his heels

This Sept. 1, 2020 photo provided by San Diego Zoo Global shows Kurt, a tiny horse who is actually a clone. Little Kurt looks like any other baby horse as he frolics playfully in his pen. But the 2-month-old, dun-colored colt was created by fusing cells taken from an endangered Przewalski's horse at the San Diego Zoo in 1980. The cells were infused with an egg from a domestic horse that gave birth to Kurt two months ago. The baby boy was named for Kurt Benirschke, a founder of the San Diego Zoo's Frozen Zoo, where thousands of cell cultures are stored. Scientists hope he'll help restore the Przewalski's population, which numbers only about 2,000. (Christine Simmons/San Diego Zoo Global via AP)
science

In a world first, scientists have cloned a rare, endangered Przewalski’s horse. They used cells taken from a stallion 40 years ago and fused them with an egg from a domestic horse

Record fast flight to International Space Station

This NASA handout photo shows Expedition 64 NASA astronaut Kate Rubins seen as she has her Russian Sokol suit pressure checked as she and fellow crewmates Sergey Kud-Sverchkov and Sergey Ryzhikov of Roscosmos prepare for their Soyuz launch to the International Space Station on October 14, 2020, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. - The trio launched at 1:45 a.m. EDT to begin a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station. (Photo by Andrey SHELEPIN / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA/GCTC/ANDREY SHELEPIN/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

A new crew has arrived at the International Space Station in less time than it takes to catch a plane flight from one side of Australia to the other

Tardigrades found with glowing blue UV shield

A species of tardigrade that glows blue in UV light. Picture: Suma et al/Biology Letters
science

Scientists have discovered a new species of tardigrade with a new superpower — a blue fluorescent coating — that protects them and other living things it is painted onto against extreme UV light

Starman in a Tesla Roadster car flies past Mars

TOPSHOT - This still image taken from a SpaceX livestream video shows "Starman" sitting in SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster after the Falcon Heavy rocket delivered it into orbit around the Earth on February 6, 2018. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / SPACEX / HO / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / SPACEX" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

Elon Musk’s car has just passed Mars after he blasted it into space in 2018. Elsewhere in the solar system, an object thought to be an asteroid is likely a junk NASA rocket wandering since 1966

The planets better suited for life than Earth

An artist’s impression of the ARIEL spacecraft as it heads toward its operational position in 2028. CREDIT: ESA/STFC RAL Space/UCL/Europlanet-Science Office
space

Scientists have discovered 24 “superhabitable” planets that are older, larger, warmer and wetter than Earth, making them ideal for life

Citizen scientists’ photos needed for Reef census

Divers photograph coral as part of the Great Reef Census launch at Milln Reef off Cairns.  PICTURE: CITIZENS OF THE GREAT BARRIER REEF
environment

A fleet of fishing and tourist boats, yachts and research ships with citizen scientists on board equipped with snorkels and cameras is completing a world-first study of the Great Barrier Reef

NASA tests Moon suits for 2024 Artemis mission

The tests include practising picking up Moon rocks and planting an American flag Credit: NASA
space

Picking up Moon rocks, fixing a lunar lander and planting an American flag are some of the tasks NASA testers are doing in the new space suits at the bottom of a deep swimming pool

Wild devils return to mainland after 3000 years

This undated handout photo released by Aussie Ark on October 1, 2020 shows a Tasmanian devil walking in the wild in mainland Australia. - Tasmanian devils have been released into the wild on Australia's mainland 3,000 years after the feisty marsupials went extinct there, in what conservationists described on October 5 as a "historic" step. (Photo by Handout / Aussie Ark / AFP) / TO GO WITH AFP STORY Australia-environment-animal RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Aussie Ark" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS --- NO ARCHIVES ---
animals

After what’s believed to be thousands of years, there are once again wild Tasmanian devils on the Australian mainland, with 26 reintroduced so far in the Barrington Tops National Park, NSW

Hi-tech fake eggs helping solve sea turtle crime

Green turtle. Picture: iStock.
technology

Scientists have used 3D-printed fake eggs containing GPS trackers to follow sea turtle eggs stolen from nests by poachers. All seven sea turtle species are listed as threatened and every egg matters

Calling all birders for big citizen science event

Bird - Fairy Wren in Song
science

It’s time for Australia’s largest citizen science event, the Aussie Backyard Bird Count. Last year, 88,000 people spotted almost 3.4 million birds in the annual avian survey. What birds can you see?

See our neighbour Mars up close in the night sky

This composite image, from NASA Galileo and Mars Global Survey orbiters, of Earth and Mars was created to allow viewers to gain a better understanding of the relative sizes of the two planets. Picture: NASA/JPL
space

Mars is the closest it will be to Earth for the next 15 years — just 62.1 million kilometres away — and you should be able to easily spot it without a telescope above Australia throughout October

All the action of the famous peregrine falcon family

Screenshot of a peregrine falcon sitting with its chicks. Picture: 367collinsfalcons.com.au
animals

Three peregrine falcon chicks have hatched in a nest on the side of a Melbourne skyscraper. The birds are the stars of a live webcam watched by thousands of people around the world

Titanium toilet blasts off to space station

In this June 18, 2020 photo provided by NASA, astronaut Kate Rubins, center, and support personnel review the Universal Waste Management System, a low-gravity space toilet, in Houston. The new device is scheduled to be delivered to the International Space Station on Oct. 1, 2020. (Norah Moran/NASA via AP)
space

Astronauts on the ISS are about to test NASA’s first new space toilet in decades — a $32 million titanium toilet more suitable for women — before its eventual use on the Moon

What will you name the sea-lion pup?

****EMBARGOED UNTIL TUESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER****
Taronga Zoo welcome the arrival of a female Australian Sea Lion pup born on July 29 to mum Nala, pictured getting used to the surroundings before being introduced to the public. Picture: Toby Zerna
animals

Zookeepers need your help to name a very special endangered Australian sea-lion pup who made her first public splash this week. Fewer than 25 pups are born in the wild each year

Alligator-squeak research wins big science prize

3 year old Mississippi alligator.  She can live to over 100 years and grow to 4 metres.
science

Scientists have won an international prize for research intended to make you laugh — and then think — for testing whether an alligator that breathes in helium squeaks like Minnie Mouse

How do bees make honey?

Close-up of a honey bee for Cameron England SAWeekend story. Picture: iStock
explainers

It’s spring! Plants everywhere are springing to life and flowering after winter. Bees are pretty excited, too, because flowers are vital for honey making. Kids News researched how bees make honey

T-rex called Stan sells for more than $44 million

A Tyrannosaurus rex (T-Rex) skeleton, named STAN is on display during a press preview at Christie's Rockefeller Center on September 15, 2020 in New York City. - The skeleton of a 40-foot (12-meter) dinosaur nicknamed "Stan", one of the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex specimens ever found, will be auctioned in New York next month and could set a record for a sale of its kind. Discovered in 1987 near Buffalo, South Dakota, the 188-bone skeleton took more than three years to excavate and reconstruct by paleontologists from the state's Black Hills Geological Research Institute, where it has been exhibited since. (Photo by Angela Weiss / AFP)
history

UPDATED Stan weighed more than 6 tonnes and had eyes the size of baseballs. His bite could have crushed a car. And this famous Tyrannosaurus rex has been sold for more than $44 million

Hope for diabetics in three-minute thesis

University of Adelaide PhD candidate Khalia Primer, 23 originally from Cleve on the Eyre Peninsula, in the laboratory at SAHMRI. She working on gene therapy to treat diabetic ulcers. 14 September 2020. Picture Dean Martin
science

Scientist Khalia Primer’s award-winning video cleverly explains years of complex gene therapy research that could help solve some of the serious health problems faced by people with diabetes

Venus clouds show signs of possible life

An artist's impression of the Venusian surface for National Geographic TV program ''Earth's Evil Twin'' about planet Venus. (Photo credit: European Space Agency)
space

We know humans couldn’t survive the heat and huge pressure on Venus, our closest neighbour. But some form of alien life could be producing an Earth-like gas astronomers have found in its clouds

Very rare ‘walking’ scorpion fish spotted on Reef

Scientists have viewed the deepest regions of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park
science

On an expedition by a robot to the depths of the Great Barrier Reef, scientists have found new species of black coral, sponges and a rare and awkward-looking “walking” scorpion fish

Scan of 10.3 million stars doesn’t find aliens – yet

The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), a low frequency radio telescope in Western Australia, is seen in this undated aerial view released on September 8, 2020. International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR)/Curtin University/Handout via REUTERS NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
space

In the broadest search for extraterrestrial life ever completed, scientists have looked for aliens in a scan of more than 10 million stars using a radio telescope in Western Australia

Scientists solve mystery of giant melting glacier

Thwaites glacier is said to be 'the most vulnerable place in Antarctica' Credit: AFP
environment

Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier — more than twice as big as Tasmania — is melting from below, putting it at risk of collapse. Scientists now know warm water flowing beneath it is to blame

Famous aquanaut plans undersea human habitat

Proteus artist's illustration side view
environment

Fabien Cousteau, grandson of the great oceanographer Jacques Cousteau, is building an underwater living and working space for humans to help us better understand oceans and climate change

Mighty mice keep muscles in space

Astronaut to Mars
space

As humans get ready for long trips to Mars, scientists are working on how to keep them strong and healthy by studying astronaut mice with big muscles sent to the International Space Station

T-rex maybe not so mighty after all

The new estimate is far smaller than the size of the T-Rex portrayed in the Jurassic Park films Credit: �2018 UNIVERSAL CITY STUDIOS PRODUCTIONS LLLP AND AMBLIN ENTERTAINMENT, INC
animals

An international team of scientists — led by a palaeontologist at the University of New England in New South Wales — have re-examined 100 years of dinosaur research to look afresh at T-rex

Biggest black hole collision ever detected

EMBARGOED 10 PM WEDNESDAY Caption:
Artist’s impression of binary black holes about to collide. Image credit:
Mark Myers, ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery
(OzGrav)
space

Adelaide scientists are part of the international team celebrating the discovery of the most massive black hole collision and merger ever detected and which happened almost 7 billion years ago

Human-sized wormholes are possible

Silhouette of man looking at light, at end of tunnel, rear view
mathematics

Scientists have used quantum mechanics and maths to show that gateways connecting two points in space and time and big enough and stable enough for human travel are theoretically possible

Meet Gertrude, the pig with the brain implant

Screengrab  from  Neuralink you tube   shows Gertrude the pig implanted with a Neuralink device and her brain activity graph during a presentation ., Elon Musk has unveiled a pig called Gertrude with a coin-sized computer chip in her brain to demonstrate his ambitious plans to create a working brain-to-machine interface. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSutodqCZ74&feature=youtu.be
technology

A company co-founded by Elon Musk has fitted computer chips into the brains of three little pigs in a trial that could lead to people being able to control computers with their minds

World waits for peregrine falcon eggs to hatch

A peregrine falcon living on the edge of a Melbourne skyrise building has hatched an egg.. Frame grab from 367 Collins Street Falcons Live Stream
animals

Via a live webcam, the eyes of the world are on a peregrine falcon nesting on the side of a Melbourne skyscraper who has laid at least three eggs, which are expected to hatch in about 32 days

Flying car takes off with passenger

Flying car test in Japan. Picture: AP
technology

Dreams of zipping around the sky in a flying car are one step closer to becoming reality after a successful test flight with a person in a vehicle that looks like a motorbike with propellers

Chirps from space reach Earth again

The CSIRO Parkes Observatory is seen ahead of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing, 380km west of Sydney, Friday, July 19, 2019. The Parkes Observatory (also known informally as "The Dish" is a radio telescope observatory, located 20 kilometres north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales, Australia. It was one of several radio antennae used to receive live television images of the Apollo 11 moon landing, on July 20 1969. (AAP Image/Mick Tsikas) NO ARCHIVING
space

More mysterious Fast Radio Bursts have made it to Earth from a galaxy three billion light-years away but researchers still don’t know what they are and why they’re coming here

How cold was it in the coldest part of the Ice Age?

Two mammoth in a field covered of snow, with some bushes and a few bisons. Blue sky with clouds in the background.
weather

Scientists have calculated just how cold it got on Earth during the coldest part of the last Ice Age, using ocean plankton fossils and climate models

World-first parachute jump from solar plane

TOPSHOT - Initiator of sun-powered stratospheric SolarStratos plane project Raphael Domjan jumps during a successful world record attempt by jumping with a parachute from a solar-powered plane on August 25, 2020 in Payerne, western Switzerland. - The SolarStratos, a sleek, white, two-seater aircraft with long wings, covered with 22 square metres (237 square feet) of solar panels is set to become the first manned solar plane to make a stratospheric flight, according to Raphael Domjan, who is behind the project. (Photo by LAURENT GILLIERON / AFP)
environment

Inventors working to one day fly a solar-powered plane to the edge of space have performed the first jump and free fall from an electric aircraft

Big welcome for endangered baby animals

Kala with her newborn infant gorilla. Picture: Bristol ZooSource:Supplied
animals

Zookeepers announce the arrival of a baby critically endangered western lowland gorilla, twin golden lion tamarins and a giant panda as big as a chocolate bar in a great week for conservation

Hope for gold at the end of the tunnel

preliminary work a kilometre underground in a Stawell gold mine in the search for the universe's elusive 'dark matter'. The yellow container is an emergency oxygen supply.Need to be credited "image courtesy Swinburne University".
money

Victoria is on the verge of a second gold rush fuelled by gold’s high world price and modern mining methods, with hopes the precious metal will help the state recover after COVID-19

Coral recovery hope for Great Barrier Reef

Pictures for the AIMS Annual Summary Report on the Great Barrier Reef.
environment

The Great Barrier Reef is fighting back, with new research showing “encouraging” signs of coral growth in two-thirds of 86 monitored reefs

Animals with superpowers need your help

Finley (11) and Cohen (9) Howland playing the ANiMOZ Trading Card Game with Kinta the Quokka on August 11, 2020 at the Adelaide Zoo. Picture Matt Turner.
animals

Did you know that Australia’s critically endangered animals each have a superpower? Nominate your favourite animal to appear on a trading card that could help save them from extinction

Human blood is warm, but cool too!

3D render blood cells.
science

Kids News is celebrating National Science Week by taking a look at the approximately five litres of hardworking red blood pumping around a person’s body that gives us our get up and go

Is my pet happy, angry, scared or sad?

Tabby  and white cat and Happy Border Collie crossbreed dog with smiling expression looking at camera. picture iStock
technology

In a first for animals, researchers in Australia have invented an app that uses AI to tell you what breed your dog or cat is and how it is feeling — happy, angry, neutral, sad and scared

Winning photos focus on wonders of science

2020 Beaker Street Science Photo Prize finalists. Tasmanian devil joeys being checked by researcher in mothers pouch.Picture: Heath Holden
science

An image of tiny Tasmanian devil joeys inside their mother’s pouch is a finalist in a photo competition shining a light on the importance of science for National Science Week

Spaceship heading for Australian Outback

The Hayabusa2 will land in the South Australian outback in December 2020. Picture: Akihiro Ikeshita
space

Japan’s space agency will land a capsule carrying samples from a 4.5 billion-year-old asteroid called Ryugu in the South Australian Outback later this year

World temperature record set at Death Valley

DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, CALIFORNIA - AUGUST 17: Visitors walk near a sign warning of extreme heat danger on August 17, 2020 in Death Valley National Park, California. The temperature reached 130 degrees at Death Valley National Park on August 16, hitting what may be the hottest temperature recorded on Earth since at least 1913, according to the National Weather Service. Park visitors have been warned, ‘Travel prepared to survive.’   Mario Tama/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
weather

One of the hottest air temperatures recorded anywhere on Earth in at least a century, and possibly ever, was reached on Sunday afternoon at Death Valley in the US, where it soared to 54.4C

Seed bank saving rare native plants from bushfire threat

Seed Vault at Australian PlantBank. The Australian PlantBank is located at the Australian Botanic Garden Mount Annan and is the largest native seed bank in Australia and one of the largest in the world, helping to protect Australia’s precious 25,000 native plant species from the threats of extinction. The goal of PlantBank is to collect store and study viable seeds or live tissue specimens of all plant species in Australia.  Photo:The Australian PlantBank.
science

The race is on to collect rare plant seeds and protect species from extinction at Australia’s own version of the “doomsday vault”. It’s one way science is helping our environment this National Science Week

Meet ‘terror croc’ with banana-sized teeth

Illustration of Deinosuchus catching prey Credit: GETTY IMAGES - GETTY
animals

Deinosuchus was a giant reptile that terrorised dinosaurs that came to the water’s edge to drink, according to a new study of fossils that also uncovered a third species of these scary beasts

Volcano on Pacific Ring of Fire erupts

TOPSHOT - Mount Sinabung spews thick ash and smoke into the sky in Karo, North Sumatra on August 10, 2020. (Photo by Anto Sembiring / AFP)
geography

Indonesia’s Mount Sinabung has erupted, sending ash 5km into the sky. It’s the latest eruption along the 40,000km-long line of volcanoes, faults and trenches called the Pacific Ring of Fire

Ocean world discovered between Mars and Jupiter

NASA's Dawn spacecraft captured pictures in visible and infrared wavelengths, which were combined to create this false-color view of a region in 57-mile-wide (92-kilometer-wide) Occator Crater on the dwarf planet Ceres. Picture: JPL/NASA
space

A NASA mission has discovered a saltwater ocean world in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Until now, freezing dwarf planet Ceres was thought to be a barren space rock

NASA to drop harmful space nicknames

In 1787, astronomer William Herschel discovered the Eskimo Nebula. From the ground, NGC 2392 resembles a person's head surrounded by a parka hood. In 2000, the Hubble Space Telescope imaged the Eskimo Nebula (about 5000 light-years away). From space, the nebula displays gas clouds so complex they are not fully understood. The inner filaments visible above are being ejected by strong wind of particles from the central star. The outer disk contains unusual light-year long orange filaments - space
space

The US space agency will stop using the nicknames of some cosmic objects — such as NGC 2392, the “Eskimo Nebula” — in an effort to address discrimination and inequality

Penguin poop images from space reveal new Antarctic colonies

The smudges on the ice show the existence of an emperor penguin colony. Image taken from the European Commission’s Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite
animals

New satellite images of emperor penguin droppings have revealed a surprising number of colonies in Antarctica, where the flightless birds are under threat from global warming

Australia’s famous tree-kangaroo becomes a dad

Nupela gave birth earlier this year on 4 February and her care team witnessed the baby crawl into the safety of mum’s pouch. Although a first-time mother, Nupela is a natural and her instincts see her regularly cleaning her pouch and grooming her little one who is growing fast. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE
animals

Makaia, an endangered Goodfellow’s tree-kangaroo, made news as a tiny orphaned joey when he was kept alive in the pouch of another species. He’s now all grown up and has become a dad

Gut play: look inside your insides in real time

Small intestine anatomy of male - Stock image Small intestine anatomy of male - Stock image
technology

Ever wondered what the inside of your stomach looks like? Now you can see for yourself with new Australian technology to give patients real-time vision of their insides

Lump on leg shows dinosaurs got cancer

Centrosaurus dinosaur, bones from which are being excavated live at the Australian Museum in Sydney.
science

It’s tempting to think of dinosaurs as supernatural or mythical beasts but we now know for sure they were affected by many of the same diseases as humans and other animals, including cancer