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Science

A giant moth the size of a rat was found by a tradie during the build of the Mt Cotton State School in Redland, Queensland. 
Picture:  Mt Cotton State School Facebook.

Heaviest moth in the world found at primary school

animals

Builders have found a giant wood moth as big as two adult human fists while working at a Queensland school, sparking a creative writing story in which the teacher is eaten by moths

KIDS NEWS: The Stratolaunch Roc aircraft, a six-engine jet with the world's longest wingspan, completed its second tsr flight, Thursday, April 29, 2021 in Mojave, California. Picture: AP Photo/Matt Hartman.

World’s widest plane aces test flight

space

Two years after its first flight, the gigantic Stratolaunch aircraft took to the skies for a second time above the Mojave Desert in the US.

Parrot flies back from brink of extinction

animals

Five years ago, scientists faced the prospect of the critically endangered orange-bellied parrot “going extinct right in front of us”, but now those same scientists are grinning from ear to ear

Latest

Some good news for endangered Sumatran rhino

SUNDAY ESCAPE. WILDLIFE WISHLIST. Sumatran rhino. Picture: Taronga Conservation Society Australia
animals

With only an estimated 80 Sumatran rhinos left in the wild, the results of a new study deliver welcome hope for the survival of the species.

Weird fish makes comeback in Murray River

A lamprey fish close up. Picture: Department for Environment and Water South Australia
environment

Scientists have found a spooky-looking, bloodsucking, critically endangered native fish in record numbers in the Murray River system, which is great news for the environment and lamprey fish

Creepy-crawlies on the menu

Edible insects are high in protein, vitamins and other macronutrients.  For spread of bread, desserts etc. (Image: Boris Ceko)
health

Bugs like witchetty grubs, bogong moths and green tree ants could soon be on Australian dinner plates under a plan to grow our edible insect industry

Just three per cent of Earth untouched by humans

ESCAPE: Toucan, Peru - uniworld, peru, amazon, rainforest, nature, wildlife, animals, toucan, Bird. Picture: Uniworld
environment

A new scientific study has found as little as 3 per cent of the world’s land surfaces are still home to their full range of native species and remain unspoilt by human activity

Group spends 40 days in French cave for experiment

Members of the French team that participated in the "Deep Time" study pose for a photo after exiting the Lombrives Cave in Ussat les Bains, France, Saturday, April 24, 2021. After 40 days in voluntary isolation, 15 people participating in a scientific experiment have emerged from a vast cave in southwestern France. Eight men and seven women lived in the dark, damp depths of the Lombrives cave in the Pyrenees to help researchers understand how people adapt to drastic changes in living conditions and environments. They had no clocks, no sunlight and no contact with the world above. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
science

Imagine 40 days in a cave without light, clocks or technology. That’s what a group of 15 volunteers has done for a scientific experiment in France

Fitbits for Phillip Island penguins

Ever thought your other half wasn't pulling their weight in the parenting role? Well it appears that Little Penguins have the same issue! A new paper published in the International Society for Behavioural Ecology's journal, shows some individual penguins work harder than their partners to feed their chicks. The study is part of joint research between Australian and French scientists. According to one of the paper's authors, Phillip Island Nature Parks' Penguin Biologist, Dr Andre Chiaradia, the findings come as something of a surprise, as it was previously thought both parents contributed equally to raising chicks.
animals

Phillip Island’s little penguins are small but mighty adaptable, according to a new scientific study using custom-made ‘fitbits’.

Oxygen extracted from thin Mars air

This NASA photo shows the Perseverance Mars rover in a selfie with the Ingenuity helicopter, seen here about 13 feet (3.9 meters) from the rover, on April 6, 2021, the 46th Martian day, or sol, of the mission and taken by the WATSON (Wide Angle Topographic Sensor for Operations and eNgineering) camera. - NASA is targeting no earlier than Sunday, April 11, for Ingenuity Mars Helicopter’s first attempt at powered, controlled flight on another planet. A livestream confirming Ingenuity’s first flight is targeted to begin around 3:30 a.m. EDT Monday, April 12. (Photo by Handout / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

NASA has achieved another first in its mission to Mars, extracting breathable oxygen from the Red Planet’s atmosphere which is made up mostly of carbon dioxide

Billions of T-rex roamed the Earth

Chris Pratt faces a rampaging T-Rex dinosaur in a scene from film Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
animals

If it scares you to think about one bus-sized T-rex rampaging across the land, what about 2.5 billion of them? New tyrannosaur research has suggested there were 20,000 alive at a time during their reign

Kids quizzed by app to gain phone access

Alyssa Elnekave, 13, using the new app 1Question, at home in Rozelle, today.
Her parents, Ann and Issac Elnekave, have invented an app called 1Question and
1Questian Parent.
The app forces kids to answer maths questions to unlock apps and games on their phones. 
Picture:Justin Lloyd
technology

Two Australian parents have invented an app that asks kids a maths or English problem before they can unlock their phones.

This is what a spider web sounds like

(GERMANY OUT) Gartenkreuzspinne (Araneus diadematus) - European garden spider (Araneus diadematus) (Photo by Alfred Schauhuber/McPhoto/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
science

Scientists have used artificial intelligence to study spiders and their webs to create eerie music from the vibrations. Listen to what a spider web sounds like

Mars helicopter takes off on first flight

This NASA photo was taken after the first flight of NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter — and the first powered, controlled flight on another planet,  captured by Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoomable cameras aboard NASA's Perseverance Mars rover, on April 19, 2021. - Flying in a controlled manner on Mars is far more difficult than flying on Earth. Mars has significant gravity (about one-third that of Earth's), but its atmosphere is just 1 percent as dense as Earth's at the surface. Stitched together from multiple images, the mosaic is not white balanced; instead, it is displayed in a preliminary calibrated version of a natural color composite, approximately simulating the colors of the scene that we would see if we were there viewing it ourselves. (Photo by Handout / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/ASU / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/ASU/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

NASA’s experimental helicopter Ingenuity rose into the thin air above the dusty red surface of Mars on Monday, achieving the first powered flight by an aircraft on another planet

Earth safe from asteroid hit

An illustration of a large asteroid impacting Earth. An impact this large would result in the extinction of most all life on Earth. Earth texture maps courtesy of NASA - source http
space

An asteroid that had threatened to crash into Earth has been removed from NASA’s ‘risk list’ for at least the next 100 years

Leeches invade NSW homes after floods

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 21: A leech slithers along the ground in Windsor on March 21, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. Evacuation warnings are in place for parts of Western Sydney as floodwaters continue to rise. (Photo by Jenny Evans/Getty Images)
animals

The recent floods in NSW have brought more than just record rainfall – and bloodthirsty leeches are loving it

Supermoon helps free stuck ship

A picture released by Egypt's Suez Canal Authority on March 29, 2021, shows a man waving the Egyptian flag after Panama-flagged MV 'Ever Given' container ship was fully dislodged from the banks of the Suez. - The ship was refloated and the Suez Canal reopened, sparking relief almost a week after the huge container ship got stuck and blocked a major artery for global trade. Salvage crews have been working around the clock ever since the accident which has been blamed on high winds and poor visibility during a sandstorm. (Photo by - / SUEZ CANAL AUTHORITY / AFP)
geography

The stars, sun, Earth and moon all aligned in Egypt this week, with the year’s first supermoon bringing the high tide needed to shift the massive ship blocking the Suez Canal

Surprise just-in-time find of tiny native fish

EMBARGO SUNDAY 28 MARCH: NO THE AUSTRALIAN/NO NEWS.COM/NO SKY NEWS - ONE TIME USE ONLY -  Southern Purple Spotted Gudgeon (Mogurnda adspersa) just captured in field is held by researcher Amy Russelll (from the North Catchment Managment Authorty before being measured and released back.
Captive (taken in-field) and under the supervision of researchers.
Reedy Lake, Kerang, Victoria, Australia.
November, 2020.  MUST CREDIT PHOTOGRAPHER:  DOUG GIMESY
animals

The future looks bright for the southern purple spotted gudgeon fish, a tiny native species twice declared regionally extinct and this time found in a lake just two days before it was to be drained

Meet Nemo, the peacock spider

A newly discovered species of peacock spider with a bright orange face has been named Nemo after the clownfish featured in the hit movie Finding Nemo. Picture: Museum Victoria
animals

A newly discovered species of peacock spider with a bright orange face has been named after the clownfish from hit animated movie Finding Nemo

Aussie Dish to support Moon landings

04/07/2019. CSIRO's Parkes Radio Telescope, situated outside the town of Parkes in Western NSW. Ahead of the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 Moon landing. Pictures received by the telescope of Neil Armstrong's first steps on the lunar surface of the moon were broadcast around the world on 21 July 1969. Britta Campion / The Australian
space

Australia’s Parkes telescope will be part of one of the first commercial lunar landings, probably this year. The 64m telescope is valuable for spacecraft tracking due to its large dish surface

Thunder Birds, Australia’s big ugly ducklings

M041248 Dromornis stirtoni, Reconstruction of Central Australian Miocene.   

This reconstruction depicts a scene in times past, 8 million years before the present. Then Dromornis stirtoni, the largest species of "Mihirung", roamed the Central Australia landscape, browsing on leaves, fruit, flowers, petioles and twigs growing three or four metres above the ground. (Credit: Artist Peter Trusler)
animals

Australia was once home to the world’s biggest-ever bird, which weighed as much as a cow. Scientists have called Dromornis stirtoni an “extreme evolutionary experiment”

Mars helicopter ready to take flight

Illustration of the Ingenuity helicopter on the NASA's Perseverance rover that landed on Mars on February 18, 2021. Image supplied by NASA
space

NASA’s mini helicopter, Ingenuity, is set to make history on Mars by taking the first powered flight on another planet

‘Lunar ark’ plan to store species’ DNA on the Moon

A team of University of Arizona researchers has mapped out a plan for a "Lunar Ark" to store the DNA of 6.7 million species on the moon in case a disaster destroys life on Earth. Image: Jekan Thanga
space

Scientists have mapped out a plan to store the DNA of 6.7 million species in a “lunar ark” on the Moon in case of a disaster on Earth

The mystery of Mars’ missing oceans

Mars, The Red Planet, imaged using the Hubble Space Telescope. Picture: NASA
space

Scientists have a new idea to test out about how Mars went from being a wet world to the desert it is today. Instead of escaping into space, they now believe water was absorbed into the surface

Teaching honeyeaters to sing the right song

A regent honeyeater. Picture: Douglas Gimesy
animals

Male songbirds usually learn their tunes from adult mentors, but when young birds lack proper role models, they hit all the wrong notes — and have less success attracting mates

American city turns off lights to save birds

PHILADELPHIA ..  for John Huxley story  ..   the city skyline with the Ben Franklin Bridge over the Delaware River
animals

A group in the US city of Philadelphia has started Lights Out Philly to try to reduce the number of confused birds dying during migration

All aboard for faster-than-light travel

(L-r) Chewbacca character with actor Mark Hamill, Alec Guinness and Harrison Ford in the Millennium Falcon in scene from Special Edition "Star Wars" film trilogy. /Films/Titles/Star/Wars
space

Spaceships zipping at the speed of light or faster are currently something from science fiction. But a physicist’s new research moves the idea a step closer to being achieved in your lifetime

‘Cute and weird’ sea slugs lose their heads

This undated photo provided by Sayaka Mitoh shows a Elysia cf. marginata sea slug after autotomy. According to a study released in the journal Current Biology on Monday, March 8, 2021, scientists have discovered that some Japanese sea slugs can grow whole new bodies if their heads are cut off, taking regeneration to the most extreme levels ever seen. (Sayaka Mitoh via AP)
animals

In an extreme case of autotomy, Japanese sea slugs have been found to regrow new bodies after decapitating themselves, which could help us better understand human regeneration

What fascinating job will Future You do?

5/3/21. Enfield Primary school students Shania - 8 and sister Bella Clinch - 9yrs are involved with the "Women in STEM, Future You" Program.
Picture: Keryn Stevens
science

Breaking stereotypes and giving girls new ideas about careers is the aim of a campaign called Future You, which features videos, games and quizzes about 12 characters with great STEM skills

Possum babies Bib and Bub growing well

***HOLD EMBARGO FOR MARCH 1RST CHECK WITH DT PIC DESK BEFORE USE***, , DAILY TELEGRAPH - 23/2/21, Baby Eastern Pygmy Possums pictured with Dean Reid from The Australian Reptile Park on the Central Coast today. Picture: Sam Ruttyn
animals

Two orphaned eastern pygmy possums barely the size of a fingertip are thriving thanks to a human helping hand. The five-week-old babies are being cared for at the Australian Reptile Park

Free tickets up for grabs for 2023 Moon trip

(FILES) This file photo taken on October 9, 2018 shows Yusaku Maezawa, entrepreneur and then-chief of online fashion company Zozo and SpaceX BFR's first private passenger, poses with a miniature rocket and space helmet prior to start of a press conference at the Foreign Correspondents' Club of Japan in Tokyo. - A Japanese billionaire has launched an online wanted ad -- a girlfriend who will fly around the Moon with him on a SpaceX rocket. The deadline to apply is January 17, 2020. (Photo by Toshifumi KITAMURA / AFP)
space

The worldwide search is on for eight passengers to take a trip around the Moon in 2023 with Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa. He will pay the entire cost of the SpaceX flight

Australia’s incredible women of influence

Australian Open tennis. 17/02/2021. Day 10.. Ash Barty vs Karolina Muchova on Rod Laver Arena.  Ash Barty during her 3 set loss    . Pic: Michael Klein
humanities

March 8 is International Women’s Day, a day of celebration when all women are recognised for their achievements. Kids News profiles 10 incredible Australian women of influence

Three new glowing sharks light up twilight zone

Lateral and dorsal luminescent pattern of Dalatias licha. (A) Lateral daylight view and luminescent pattern highlighting the dorso-ventral luminous pattern. (B) Dorsal daylight view and luminescent pattern. Luminescence of the second dorsal fin is observable on this specimen (red arrowhead). Scale bar: 10 cm.
animals

Three new species of bioluminescent sharks — including the largest known underwater glowing creature — have been found in deep, dark water off the coast of New Zealand

Australia the first home of giant komodo dragons

Komodo Dragon, the largest lizard in the world.
animals

Indonesia’s komodo, the largest living lizard still on Earth, likely originated in Australia millions of years ago from a mix of parents, according to new research

Mars rover’s parachute carried secret message

This NASA video frame grab photo released on February 22, 2021 shows what NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance mission captured in footage of its rover landing in Mars' Jezero Crater on February 18, 2021, the real footage in this video was captured by several cameras that are part of the rover's entry, descent, and landing suite. The views include a camera looking down from the spacecraft's descent stage (a kind of rocket-powered jet pack that helps fly the rover to its landing site), a camera on the rover looking up at the descent stage, a camera on the top of the aeroshell (a capsule protecting the rover) looking up at that parachute, and a camera on the bottom of the rover looking down at the Martian surface. - The US space agency NASA on February 22, 2021 released the first video of the landing of the Perseverance rover on Mars. The video clip, lasting three minutes and 25 seconds, showed the deployment of the parachute and the rover's touchdown on the surface of the Red Planet. "These are really amazing videos," said Michael Watkins, director of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "This is the first time we've ever been able to capture an event like the landing on Mars." (Photo by Lizabeth MENZIES / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA/JPL-Caltech/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

The huge parachute used by NASA’s Perseverance rover to land on Mars contained a secret message in binary code, thanks to a crossword lover on the spacecraft team having fun

Mount Etna’s spectacular volcanic eruption

CATANIA, ITALY FEBRUARY 21, 2021: Mount Etna erupts in Sicily sending plumes of ash and spewing lava into air - PHOTOGRAPH BY Marco Restivo / Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Marco Restivo/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
geography

Mount Etna, Europe’s most active volcano, has awed even experienced volcanologists, pumping out spectacular displays of lava, ash and volcanic rocks for more than a week

Make some noise Mars, we’re listening

This image provides a global "snapshot" of weather patterns across Mars. Here, bluish-white water ice clouds hang above the Tharsis volcanoes. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
space

A microphone on NASA’s Perseverance rover has recorded for the first time the sound of another planet. It’s hoped there will be more to hear from Mars soon as the rover gets to work

Animals lend a helping hand at the zoo

Aldabra Giant Tortoise Training Melbourne Zoo
animals

Melbourne Zoo’s oldest residents have shown no one’s ever too old to learn. Elephant Mek Kapah and tortoises Wilbur, Little John and Jean are all involved in their own health checks

Space capsule reveals its treasures in Aussie outback

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) mission images showing recovery of the re-entry space capsule following its landing near Woomera, South Australia on December 6, 2020. The capsule carrying samples from a distant asteroid (Ryugu) was dropped off by Japanese space probe Hayabusa-2. Some images show the heat shield, which has detached from the capsule on release of the parachute. The capsule had a soft landing in a bush. JAXA expedition’s photographer Anthony Gordon. Picture: Anthony Gordon for JAXA
space

Australia is set to play a bigger part in international space missions as scientists reveal the treasures collected from a Japanese capsule that returned to Earth near Woomera

NASA rover touches down on Mars

This NASA handout illustration obtained February 16, 2021 shows NASA’s Perseverance rover landing safely on Mars. - After a seven-month journey, NASA's Perseverance rover prepares to touch down on Mars on TFebruary 18, 2021 after first negotiating a risky landing procedure that will mark the start of its multi-year search for signs of ancient microbial life.The Mars 2020 mission, which set off late from Florida in late July, includes the largest ever vehicle to be dispatched to the Red Planet. (Photo by Handout / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA/JPL-Caltech/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

The Perseverance rover has successfully landed on Mars in its mission to look for signs of ancient life on the red planet

Koala teeth used to create archaeology map

Great Australian Wildlife Collection by Discovery channel. Koala bear eats leaves in tree. Phascolarctos cinereus. South Australia.
history

Australian archaeologists are studying ancient koala teeth and bones to create a map that will show how people and animals moved across the continent through history

Ditch digital for chalk, says learning expert

Coco, 6, write with chalk. Qld academic wants schools to get back teaching with chalk and slates. He says it's good for fine motor skills they are missing out on with screens. Picture: Tim Carrafa
technology

Primary school kids should ditch digital and return to using chalk and slates to help develop the brain, motor skills and the ability to construct a story, a leading education expert says

How does the coronavirus vaccine work?

Concept for the worldwide delivery of COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine by plane.
explainers

The first Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine doses have arrived in Australia and the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine now has approval to be used in Australia too. Kids News looks at how vaccines work

A billion years on Earth in 40 seconds

University of Adelaide Professor Alan Collins from the Tectonics & Earth Systems Research Group in the Department of Earth Sciences. Supplied.
geography

University of Adelaide scientists have released a video that, for the first time, shows the movement of the Earth’s tectonic plates over the past billion years

More girls to become STEM stars of the future

Secondary school students Hita Keshav, 15, Caitlyn Lewis, 17 and Emily Pham, 16 in the lab at Monash Science School. GIRLS are still underrepresented in STEM subjects despite major investments in recent years to boost pathways. It comes as Thursday marks the annual International Day of Women and Girls in Science. Female students at John Monash Science School, in Clayton, are celebrating the day by attending a virtual event hosted by the Royal Women's Hospital. More than 4000 students across Victoria will be involved in the event, which will see researchers and scientists give insights about their jobs. Picture: Jake Nowakowski
science

Despite still being outnumbered by males, more girls and women are starting careers in science than ever before, now making up 42.6 per cent of the workforce in STEM areas

Huge discovery of tiny chameleon

This undated handout photo released on February 5, 2021, by the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology (Zoologische Staatssammlung Munchen) shows the chameleon "Brookesia nana", identified as Earth's smallest known reptile, in Madagascar. - Scientists have identified Earth's smallest known reptile in Madagascar, warning at the same time that sustained destruction of forests the north of the island threatens its survival. Tiny enough to perch comfortably on a fingertip, the ultra-compact chameleon -- dubbed Brookesia nana -- has the same proportions and world-weary expression as its larger cousins around the world. A joint expedition in 2012 of German and Malagasy scientists did not know whether the two specimens they collected -- one female and one male -- were adults until much later, Frank Glaw, curator of herpetology at the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology, told AFP. The male's body -- about the size of a peanut -- was 13.5 millimetres long, with the tail adding another nine millimetres. The female measured 29 mm from its nose to the tip of its tail. (Photo by Frank GLAW / Zoologische Staatssammlung Munchen / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / BAVARIAN STATE COLLECTION OF ZOOLOGY (ZOOLOGISCHE STAATSSAMMLUNG MUNCHEN) / FRANK GLAW - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
animals

Scientists from Madagascar and Germany say a newly discovered species of chameleon that fits on a human fingertip is a contender for the title of world’s smallest reptile

Humans have made the oceans very noisy

The Queen Mary 2 (QM2) arrives at Port Everglades in Florida on her maiden voyage 26 Jan 2004, as tug boats shoot water cannons to celebrate her arrival. AFP picRobert/Sullivan cruise liner ship ships shipping
environment

With rumbling ships, hammering oil drills and other big noises, humans have completely altered the underwater soundscape, in some cases deafening or disorienting whales and other animals

How to tell if your dog is a genius

Funny portrait of cute smilling puppy dog border collie on couch. New lovely member of family little dog at home gazing and waiting. Pet care and animals concept
animals

An experiment that’s easy to try at home has shown “talented” dogs are able to learn the name of a new object after hearing it four times, an ability previously thought to be confined to humans

Clever solution to massive mask waste problem

A man wearing a face mask walks past a sign advertising masks in Melbourne on July 20, 2020. - Australia's second-biggest city will make it compulsory to wear a mask in public, authorities announced on July 19, as Melbourne steps up efforts to bring a coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by William WEST / AFP)
environment

Millions of disposable masks used and discarded during the pandemic could be recycled and enshrined forever into the country’s roads, Australian scientists have revealed

Scientists get to the bottom of wombat poo mystery

Baby Wombat. Coco's baby at Ballarat Wildlife Park. Coco, the 12-year-old common wombat is an exceptional mother, having just produced her third baby something very rare in captive wombats. The joey has just started exploring her new home at Ballarat Wildlife Park but never venturing too far from mum. Head curator, Julia Leonard, believes the little Joey is around 7 months old and is looking forward to baby spending more time out of the pouch. Proud parents Coco and Banjo. The park is having a naming competition for the joey and can be entered by going to www.wildlifepark.com.au
animals

The mystery behind wombats’ unique cube-shaped poo has been solved after an accidental discovery by scientists

Hanging out with Smudge at Antarctica

Antarctic expeditioner Matthew Williams and his mate Smudge the Emperor Penguin at the Auster rookery. Pictures: Matthew Williams and Guy Edgar
animals

A curious emperor penguin nicknamed Smudge has made friends with an Australian Antarctic expeditioner undertaking the annual penguin census at the Auster and Taylor rookeries

Dinosaur could be the biggest ever land animal

Handout picture released on January 20, 2021 by the CTyS-UNLaM Science Outreach Agency showing palaeontologists during an excavation in which 98 million-year-old fossils were found, at the Candeleros Formation in the Neuquen River Valley in southwest Argentina. - Scientists have unearthed massive, 98-million-year-old fossils in southwest Argentina they say may have belonged to the largest dinosaur ever discovered. Human-sized pieces of fossilized bone belonging to the giant sauropod appear to be 10-20 percent larger than those attributed to Patagotitan mayorum, the biggest dinosaur ever identified, according to a statement Wednesday from the National University of La Matanza's CTYS scientific agency. (Photo by JOSE LUIS CARBALLIDO / CTyS-UNLaM / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT AFP PHOTO / CTyS-UNLaM / JOSE LUIS CARBALLIDO - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS -DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
animals

Palaeontologists are digging up the massive 98-million-year-old fossilised skeleton of a titanosaur they now believe was the largest animal ever to walk on Earth

Guardian dogs saving bandicoots from extinction

Werribee Open Range Zoo
Guardian dog at Skipton release site. Lying in grass looking at camera with sheep in background
animals

Two very special dogs have a very special job as guardians of some critically endangered eastern barred bandicoots just released into a conservation reserve in western Victoria

‘Lord of the spear’ dinosaur all for show

Ubirajara jubatus (illustrated) may have used its shoulder streamers and feathery mane for flashy dances and displays. © BOB NICHOLLS/PALEOCREATIONS.COM 2020
animals

Scientists may have solved the mystery of the weird body parts of a chicken-like dinosaur called Ubirajara ­jubatus, which looked like something out of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Hope from ‘extinct’ species rediscovered

his photos taken on Thursday, March 12, 2020 and provide by the Staatliche Naturwissenschftliche Sammlung Bayerns, SNSB, shows a Voeltzkow-Chameleon in Madagascar. Scientists say they have found an elusive chameleon species that was last spotted in Madagascar 100 years ago. Researchers from Madagascar and Germany said that they discovered several living specimens of Voeltzkow's chameleon during an expedition to the northwest of the African island nation. (SNSB/Frank Glaw via AP)
animals

Earth is going through its sixth mass extinction event but there are moments of hope when species such as Voeltzkow’s chameleon, once thought to have been lost forever, are found alive

Listen to the sounds and music of space

This NASA composite image received 22 August 2006, shows the galaxy cluster 1E 0657-56, also known as the |bullet cluster.| A huge collision between two clusters of galaxies has provided the first direct evidence of the existence of the universe's mysterious dark matter, researchers said 22 August.|This is the most energetic cosmic event, besides the Big Bang, which we know about,| said Maxim Markevitch of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This cluster was formed after the collision of two large clusters of galaxies, the most energetic event known in the universe since the Big Bang. Hot gas detected by Chandra in X-rays is seen as two pink clumps in the image and contains most of the |normal,| or b
space

You can now hear the sounds of space, according to a NASA project that has assigned musical notes and instruments to the goings-on of two supernovas and a colliding cluster of galaxies

Australian surgeons rebuild girl’s spine

HOLD FOR SATURDAY/SUNDAY HERALD SUN PIC DESK------ The Children First Foundation has brought Nichole Jamelo over from the Phillipines to have her spine operated on at Epworth Hospital in Richmond.    Nichole back at the retreat after surgery. .  Picture: Alex Coppel.
health

Standing straight and walking tall for the first time in her life, 11-year-old Nichole Jamelo can’t wait to take on the world now that two 90-degree bends in her spine have been straightened out

Saturn and Jupiter create special ‘Christmas Star’

A little boy is standing near the window and looking outside, imagining boundless space with myriad of stars
space

On December 21, Jupiter and Saturn will come so close they will appear to us as a single planet in an event called a grand conjunction. They haven’t come this close since Galileo was alive in the 1600s

Asteroid sample lands safely in South Australia

This handout photograph taken and released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on December 6, 2020 shows recovery operations of the re-entry capsule, carrying samples collected from a distant asteroid after being dropped off by Japanese space probe Hayabusa-2, following its landing in South Australia. (Photo by Handout / JAXA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / JAXA" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

In a mission described as perfect, a capsule containing a sample of an asteroid that could help unlock some of the mysteries about life on Earth has landed in the South Australian outback

Great Barrier Reef spawning shown on TV

Acropora tenuis colony of coral spawning on Great Barrier Reef during first day of summer 01/12/96. 
Queensland / Travel
environment

In an Australian first, the annual Great Barrier Reef spawning has been shown live on TV in the hope the event will bring the country together in awe and inspire people to help protect the reef

Triceratops coming to live in Australia

Dr Erich Fitzgerald holding a 3D replica of the Triceratops mandible (jaw bone). Photographer - Benj
animals

A very special dinosaur that roamed Earth 67 million years ago is moving to Melbourne. The one-tonne triceratops skeleton has been described as one of the most complete dinosaur fossils ever found

Great Barrier Reef outlook now ‘critical’

TOPSHOT - This undated handout photo released on April 20, 2016 by XL Catlin Seaview Survey shows a turtle swimming over bleached coral at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef.  Australia's iconic Great Barrier Reef is suffering its worst coral bleaching ever recorded with 93 percent impacted, scientists said on April 20, 2016 as they revealed the phenomenon was also hitting the other side of the country. / AFP PHOTO / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY / STR / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - NO ARCHIVES
environment

Climate change is increasingly damaging UN World Heritage sites including the Great Barrier Reef, a new report warns, while 2020 is on track to be the second hottest year on record

Dinosaurs’ ferocious fight to the death

Duelling Dinosaurs
Picture: North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
animals

An Australian geologist is working to uncover the fossilised scene of a T-rex and a triceratops apparently locked in a ferocious duel, the teeth of the T-rex embedded in the other’s spine

Aussie telescope maps new atlas of the Universe

ASKAP telescope
space

In under two weeks the CSIRO’s world-leading radio telescope in Western Australia has created a Google Maps-like atlas or map of our Universe, in the meantime discovering many new galaxies

Rare baby earless dragons ready for visitors

One of the grasssland earless dragons at Melbourne Zoo. Picture: Zoos Victoria
animals

Keepers at Melbourne Zoo have proudly introduced to visitors some baby grassland earless dragons. It’s been 50 years since the last confirmed Victorian sighting of the species in the wild

Big idea kickstarts Grace’s future career

Young inventor Grace Howard who won a huge grant for her invention "kick me pedestrian button".Picture:Rob Leeson.
technology

A young inventor can now bring her idea to life after it caught the attention of some of Australia’s brightest minds and scored her a big cash prize to help make it happen

China launches mission to the Moon

A Long March 5 rocket carrying China's Chang'e-5 lunar probe launches from the Wenchang Space Center on China's southern Hainan Island on November 24, 2020, on a mission to bring back lunar rocks, the first attempt by any nation to retrieve samples from the moon in four decades. - China on Tuesday launched an unmanned spacecraft to bring back lunar rocks -- the first attempt by any nation to retrieve samples from the Moon in four decades. A Long March 5 rocket carrying the Chang'e-5 probe, named after the mythical Chinese moon goddess, blasted off from the Wenchang Space Center on the southern island province of Hainan at 4:30 am (2030 GMT Monday), the official Xinhua news agency reported. (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT
space

China has launched a spacecraft to collect rocks from the Moon for the first time in more than 40 years. It’s the country’s boldest space mission yet and could lead to a future crewed lunar landing

Census to count every koala in bid to save species

Archer the Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park. Picture: Dylan Robinson
animals

The Environment Minister unveiled a $2 million koala count as part of government’s commitment to protect the endangered species, while scientists call for threatened status for the platypus

Study using AI to make scents of history

Prof Matija Strlic smells a historical book in the National Archives of the Netherlands. Photograph: Matija Strlic
history

Scientists and historians will use AI to study and recreate what the world smelled like hundreds of years ago. Called Odeuropa, the pioneering study will build an online smell encyclopaedia

Like Superman: Aussies making diamonds in minutes

Xingshuo Huang with a sample of laboratory made diamond (Image: Jamie Kidston/ANU).
science

In nature, diamonds take billions of years, heat and pressure to form. Australian scientists have made diamonds at room temperature by squashing carbon with the weight of 640 elephants

First-ever Aussie sighting of bigfin squid

One of the Bigfin Squid found in the Great Australian Bight. The size of this squid coud not be determined due to poor visibilty. Picture: CSIRO
animals

Australian scientists have filmed five bigfin squid in the Great Australian Bight, the first time they’ve been seen in Australian waters. Little is known about these creatures of the deep

Time to wave goodbye to the peregrine chicks

The peregrine falcon chicks on November 12
animals

As Melburnians stretch their wings after the lockdown, the city’s famous peregrine falcon chicks are also stretching theirs, hopping and flying backwards and forwards along their home ledge

Meet your two-million-year-old ‘cousin’

Angi and Jesse with DNH 155. Picture: supplied
history

Australian researchers have found the skull of a big-toothed, small-brained ‘cousin’ of our species called Paranthropus robustus, which could help us understand human evolution

Vaccine maker ‘near ecstatic’ after study result

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: People walk by the Pfizer headquarters on November 9, 2020 in New York City. Pharmaceutical company Pfizer announced positive early results on its COVID-19 vaccine trial and has proven to be 90% effective in preventing infection of the virus.   David Dee Delgado/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
health

The Pfizer coronavirus vaccine has shown a 90 per cent effectiveness rate in tests, boosting global confidence. Australia last week ordered 10 million doses of this particular vaccine

Hyperloop rockets passengers in levitating pod

All aboard the Virgin Hyperloop, a pod or capsule that travels very fast through a tube using electromagnets. Picture: Virgin Hyperloop
technology

The world’s first passengers have ridden a futuristic high-speed transport system known as a hyperloop. The technology uses electromagnets to push pods through a tube at up to 1000kmh

Gene study finds two new glider species

MUST CREDIT WWF AND PHOTOGRAPHER. Greater glider in a patch of old growth forest south of Brisbane. The light greater glider and dark greater glider that are filmed separately sticking their heads out of the same hollow are a breeding pair. Picture: Josh Bowell
animals

Australian scientists have discovered two new species of one of our cutest and most-loved native animals, the greater glider. What we previously thought was one species is actually three

Asteroid could be Moon’s long-lost twin

Asteroid Vesta orbiting in the outer space as it passes through Mars. 3d render
space

A huge space rock hidden behind Mars could be a chunk of the Moon, broken off in a cosmic collision

Gigantic iceberg on collision course with island

Adolescent elephant seals are exceptionally engaging subjects. Elephant seals are found on many subantarctic islands such as South Georgia, as well as along parts of the Argentine coast. While the island supports limited vegetation and terrestrial life (75 percent of the island is under snow and ice), marine life is abundant.
environment

An iceberg the size of a small country is floating toward the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, raising fears seal and penguin parents won’t be able to access food or get back to their young

Astronomers find source of fast radio burst

This image from video animation provided by NASA in November 2020 depicts a powerful X-ray burst erupting from a magnetar – a supermagnetized version of a stellar remnant known as a neutron star. A radio burst detected April 28, 2020, occurred during a flare-up like this on a magnetar called SGR 1935. The radio signal was more powerful than any previously seen in our galaxy. The simultaneous X-ray and radio events implicate magnetars as a likely source of mysterious fast radio bursts observed from other galaxies. (Chris Smith (USRA)/NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center via AP)
space

Scientists — with the help of antennae made from actual cake tins — have solved the mystery of what causes fast radio bursts of energy that zip and zigzag through the universe

Mystery of the mass butterfly invasion

Butterflies A Caper White butterfly feeding on lantana flowers, Glasshouse Mountains,QLD
by Paul Francis,
Indooroopilly,
Mo 0400743885
animals

Hundreds of thousands of caper white butterflies have blown into Southeast Queensland in a phenomenon that only happens about every six to 10 years. Scientists can only speculate why

Study reveals benefits of all-girls schools

School girls cooperating while repairing mother board in the classroom. Focus is on arm.
humanities

Girls at single-sex schools outperform their peers at co-ed campuses, new research shows. There is less bullying and less skipping class and fewer friendship fights at single-sex schools

‘Bionic spine’ brings hope to people with disabilities

Melbourne researchers developing a "bionic spine" - effectively allowing a person to control robotic limbs through their thoughts. Royal Melbourne Hospital lead researchers Dr Tom Oxley and Dr Nick Opie are in the early stages of development.       Photo David Caird
science

Melbourne scientists and surgeons have given patients with disabilities the power to work computers with their mind in a world-first “bionic spine” breakthrough

Found! New reef taller than a skyscraper

geography

A new coral reef like an underwater mountain and taller than any building in Australia has been discovered in remote waters off Cape York, Queensland, its pinnacle about 40m below the surface

Gut bacteria could help control allergies, asthma

Yvonne Michaels and her two daughters (Giselle – 10 years old, Chloe – 7 years old) takes a holistic approach to managing her and their asthma.
Picture by Wayne Taylor 27th October 2020
health

There are positive signs in new research that hay fever, asthma, eczema and other allergies — which affect one in three Australians — could be controlled by improving your gut health

Plentiful water found on surface of Moon

(FILES) This file photo taken on December 14, 2016 shows a supermoon rising above central London.   According to recent studies published on July 24, 2017 in the magazine Nature Geoscience, the depth of the moon would be containing water.  / AFP PHOTO / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS
space

NASA has announced the discovery of surface water on the Moon in more places and in larger quantities than expected, providing drinking water and rocket fuel for future astronaut base camps

What is dyslexia? Is there a cure?

Composition with books on the table.
explainers

Dyslexia is the most common cause of reading, writing and spelling difficulties. But the good news is dyslexia is not a disease and you can have dyslexia and be really good at lots of things

Lessons from a beetle’s almost unbreakable shell

This 2016 photo provided by the University of California, Irvine, shows a diabolical ironclad beetle, which can withstand being crushed by forces almost 40,000 times its body weight and are native to desert habitats in Southern California. Scientists say the armor of the seemingly indestructible beetle could offer clues for designing stronger planes and buildings. In a study published Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020, in the journal Nature, a group of scientists explains why the beetle is so squash-resistant. (Jesus Rivera, Kisailus Biomimetics and Nanostructured Materials Lab, University of California Irvine via AP)
science

Engineers hope to learn how to design stronger planes and buildings by studying a beetle that can withstand bird pecks, animal stomps and even being rolled over by a Toyota Camry car

NASA attempts to snatch asteroid rubble

An artist's impression of the Osiris-REX spacecraft near the asteroid Bennu.  CREDIT: NASA
space

UPDATED After almost two years circling the asteroid Bennu hundreds of millions of kilometres away, a NASA spacecraft has attempted to collect a sample from the treacherous, boulder-packed surface

Kurt the cloned horse kicking up his heels

This Sept. 1, 2020 photo provided by San Diego Zoo Global shows Kurt, a tiny horse who is actually a clone. Little Kurt looks like any other baby horse as he frolics playfully in his pen. But the 2-month-old, dun-colored colt was created by fusing cells taken from an endangered Przewalski's horse at the San Diego Zoo in 1980. The cells were infused with an egg from a domestic horse that gave birth to Kurt two months ago. The baby boy was named for Kurt Benirschke, a founder of the San Diego Zoo's Frozen Zoo, where thousands of cell cultures are stored. Scientists hope he'll help restore the Przewalski's population, which numbers only about 2,000. (Christine Simmons/San Diego Zoo Global via AP)
science

In a world first, scientists have cloned a rare, endangered Przewalski’s horse. They used cells taken from a stallion 40 years ago and fused them with an egg from a domestic horse

Record fast flight to International Space Station

This NASA handout photo shows Expedition 64 NASA astronaut Kate Rubins seen as she has her Russian Sokol suit pressure checked as she and fellow crewmates Sergey Kud-Sverchkov and Sergey Ryzhikov of Roscosmos prepare for their Soyuz launch to the International Space Station on October 14, 2020, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. - The trio launched at 1:45 a.m. EDT to begin a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station. (Photo by Andrey SHELEPIN / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA/GCTC/ANDREY SHELEPIN/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

A new crew has arrived at the International Space Station in less time than it takes to catch a plane flight from one side of Australia to the other

Tardigrades found with glowing blue UV shield

A species of tardigrade that glows blue in UV light. Picture: Suma et al/Biology Letters
science

Scientists have discovered a new species of tardigrade with a new superpower — a blue fluorescent coating — that protects them and other living things it is painted onto against extreme UV light

Starman in a Tesla Roadster car flies past Mars

TOPSHOT - This still image taken from a SpaceX livestream video shows "Starman" sitting in SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster after the Falcon Heavy rocket delivered it into orbit around the Earth on February 6, 2018. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / SPACEX / HO / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / SPACEX" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

Elon Musk’s car has just passed Mars after he blasted it into space in 2018. Elsewhere in the solar system, an object thought to be an asteroid is likely a junk NASA rocket wandering since 1966

The planets better suited for life than Earth

An artist’s impression of the ARIEL spacecraft as it heads toward its operational position in 2028. CREDIT: ESA/STFC RAL Space/UCL/Europlanet-Science Office
space

Scientists have discovered 24 “superhabitable” planets that are older, larger, warmer and wetter than Earth, making them ideal for life

Citizen scientists’ photos needed for Reef census

Divers photograph coral as part of the Great Reef Census launch at Milln Reef off Cairns.  PICTURE: CITIZENS OF THE GREAT BARRIER REEF
environment

A fleet of fishing and tourist boats, yachts and research ships with citizen scientists on board equipped with snorkels and cameras is completing a world-first study of the Great Barrier Reef

NASA tests Moon suits for 2024 Artemis mission

The tests include practising picking up Moon rocks and planting an American flag Credit: NASA
space

Picking up Moon rocks, fixing a lunar lander and planting an American flag are some of the tasks NASA testers are doing in the new space suits at the bottom of a deep swimming pool

Wild devils return to mainland after 3000 years

This undated handout photo released by Aussie Ark on October 1, 2020 shows a Tasmanian devil walking in the wild in mainland Australia. - Tasmanian devils have been released into the wild on Australia's mainland 3,000 years after the feisty marsupials went extinct there, in what conservationists described on October 5 as a "historic" step. (Photo by Handout / Aussie Ark / AFP) / TO GO WITH AFP STORY Australia-environment-animal RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Aussie Ark" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS --- NO ARCHIVES ---
animals

After what’s believed to be thousands of years, there are once again wild Tasmanian devils on the Australian mainland, with 26 reintroduced so far in the Barrington Tops National Park, NSW

Hi-tech fake eggs helping solve sea turtle crime

Green turtle. Picture: iStock.
technology

Scientists have used 3D-printed fake eggs containing GPS trackers to follow sea turtle eggs stolen from nests by poachers. All seven sea turtle species are listed as threatened and every egg matters

Calling all birders for big citizen science event

Bird - Fairy Wren in Song
science

It’s time for Australia’s largest citizen science event, the Aussie Backyard Bird Count. Last year, 88,000 people spotted almost 3.4 million birds in the annual avian survey. What birds can you see?

See our neighbour Mars up close in the night sky

This composite image, from NASA Galileo and Mars Global Survey orbiters, of Earth and Mars was created to allow viewers to gain a better understanding of the relative sizes of the two planets. Picture: NASA/JPL
space

Mars is the closest it will be to Earth for the next 15 years — just 62.1 million kilometres away — and you should be able to easily spot it without a telescope above Australia throughout October

All the action of the famous peregrine falcon family

Screenshot of a peregrine falcon sitting with its chicks. Picture: 367collinsfalcons.com.au
animals

Three peregrine falcon chicks have hatched in a nest on the side of a Melbourne skyscraper. The birds are the stars of a live webcam watched by thousands of people around the world