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Science

A handout photo provided by the European Southern Observatory on April 10, 2019 shows the first photograph of a black hole and its fiery halo, released by Event Horizon Telescope astronomers (EHT), which is the "most direct proof of their existence," one of the project's lead scientists told AFP. (Photo by - / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

World’s first photo of a black hole revealed

space

A team of more than 200 scientists has worked together to capture the world’s first photograph of a black hole, a phenomenon never-before seen by humans

Delicious chocolate Easter bunny, eggs and sweets on rustic backgroundDelicious chocolate Easter bunny and eggs on rustic background

What is chocolate and is it good for you?

just for fun

Almost everyone is mad about chocolate and not just at Easter. Ahead of the annual chocolate feast, we set out to answer some of the most asked questions about this special treat

Generic image of human brain at work. Picture: Thinkstock

Mind-control brain implant trials to begin

health

An Australian hospital has approved a world-first human trial of a brain implant to help people with advanced diseases of the nervous system communicate via mind control

Latest

Ancient four-legged whale walked on land

the ancient four-legged whale in the sea
animals

Scientists have uncovered fossils of an ancient four-legged whale that walked on land and swam in the sea 43 million year ago

NASA solar probe starts flying into the Sun

the Parker Space Probe near the Sun. Artist's impression. Supplied: NASA
space

The Parker Solar Probe is on a groundbreaking mission to ‘touch the Sun’ and has now come closer to our nearest star than any other man-made object in history

Australia’s surprising supermum skink

A supplied image obtained on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, shows a baby three-toed skink hatches from an egg. Researchers at the University of Sydney have observed a three-toed skink who gave birth to eggs followed by a live baby three weeks later from the same pregnancy. (AAP Image/Nadav Pezaro) NO ARCHIVING
animals

Scientists have called a three-toed skink one of the weirdest lizards in the world after watching it lay eggs and then give birth to a baby, all in one litter

Beware of wild mushrooms

NEWS: Toadstools
health

Autumn weather means more mushrooms and other fungi growing in the wild, but as it’s almost impossible to tell which ones are deadly, avoid them all to stay safe

Mars house plans revealed

3D-printed towers may be used by Nasa to house its astronauts on Mars (artist's impression) Credit: NASA
space

It’s been a big week for our quest to live on Mars, with the confirmation of a “burp” of methane gas and NASA’s release of designs for human housing on the red planet

Extreme surfers invent iceboard surfing

Swedish surfer Pontus Hallin waits for waves as he sits on his melting ice surfboard at the Delp surfing spot, near Straumnes, in the Lofoten Islands, over the Arctic Circle on February 18, 2019. (AFP / Olivier Morin)
just for fun

Surfers have a lot of time to think about the health of the world’s oceans when they’re out there waiting for a wave, so these surfers invented the ultimate eco-friendly surfboard

‘Temporary’ Eiffel Tower turns 130

Eiffel Tower with autumn leaves in Paris, France
history

The much-loved, world-famous symbol of Paris has turned 130, after surviving fierce early criticism and an original plan to take it down after just 20 years

The massive mako shark mystery

A mako shark spotted at Browns Mountain, a sea mountain off the Sydney coastline in an area where a large collection of sea life congregate. The mako had a fishing line attached from a previous catch and release and was attracted by burley designed to attract fish to the boat.
animals

An Australian fisherman pulled in what he thought was an enormous shark, only to find it was just the head. His gruesome discovery has intrigued the world

Fossil graveyard a snapshot of asteroid hit

Computer generated simulation shows an asteroid striking thre Earth in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula aropund 150 million years ago.The extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago can be traced to a collision between two monster rocks in the asteroid belt nearly 100 million years earlier, scientists report 05 September 2007. TO GO WITH AFP STORY-Traced: The asteroid breakup that wiped out the dinosaurs by Richard Ingham AFP PHOTO RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE/NO SALES/NO INTERNET/ NO ARCHIVES
science

Scientists have discovered a fossilised snapshot of the day a huge asteroid slammed into Earth 66 million years ago, clearing the way for humans to thrive

World’s biggest T-rex unearthed

Chris Pratt faces a rampaging T-Rex dinosaur in a scene from film Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
animals

A massive, fierce dinosaur nicknamed Scotty has been dug from sandstone. Its leg bones are so big it is thought to have weighed 8800kg when it roamed the Earth

Big win in fight against extinction

Plains-wanderer chicks at Werribee Open Range Zoo. Picture: Zoos Victoria
animals

A heat lamp, a feather duster and lots of expert care has helped nine precious plains-wanderer chicks hatch and thrive, an important species-saving step

Astronauts take six-hour space walk

This image provided by NASA shows astronauts Anne McClain and Nick Hague taking a spacewalk to replace aging batteries on the International Space Station on Friday, March 22, 2019. Friday’s spacewalk is the first of three planned excursions to replace batteries and perform other maintenance. (NASA via AP)
space

Two NASA astronauts took a walk out in space for more than six hours to change some batteries on Friday. They finished early, so had time for some cleaning and sightseeing

Rare albino penguin comes out to play

In this image made from video, an albino penguin is seen along in its enclosure in Gdansk zoo, Gdansk, Poland, Friday, March 22, 2019. An extremely rare white penguin has made its public debut at the Gdansk zoo in northern Poland. The albino penguin hatched in mid-December and has been under veterinary care. In natural conditions such unusual-looking penguin would be rejected by other penguins and would have little chance of survival. (AP Photo)
animals

A rare albino penguin has made its first public appearance at a Polish zoo. Normally other penguins reject albinos, but this bird is feeling the love from its parents and two special friends

Quest to bring woolly mammoths back to life

Woolly Mammoth Family
science

Experiments on the cells of a woolly mammoth found preserved in frozen ground has brought scientists a step closer to bringing the prehistoric creatures back to life

Incredible video of snake eating snake

The larger snake eating the smaller snake
animals

An Australian woman has filmed extraordinary video of a fight to the death of two snakes of different species, with one getting a big meal for its efforts

Big fish catches fishermen by surprise

Hunter and Steven Jones with a Sunfish found on the Coorong over the weekend. Picture: Jacob Jones
animals

A group of friends thought they saw a massive rock on the sand, but we now know it was an ocean sunfish, one of the world’s biggest fish and very rare in these waters

Australia to build state-of-the-art space centre

ESCAPE: Houston NASA, Amanda Woods - part of the comprehensive spacesuit collection . Picture: Space Center Houston.
space

If humans land on Mars or walk on the Moon again, Australians could watch it live at a state-of-the-art mission control centre, which the government plans to build in Adelaide

Hip hop makes cheese taste great

Swiss cheesemaker Beat Wampfler smells a piece of cheese that has been matured for 6 month with hip-hop music on the final day of an experiment conducted by the University of the Arts in Bern on March 14, 2019 in Berthoud, in the Emmental region, central Switzerland. - Beat Wampfler, a Swiss veterinarian by day, but consumate apron-wearing cheese enthusiast at night, has embarked on an experiment to test the impact of music on Emmental. Since last September, the cheeses have each been blasted with sonic masterpieces from the likes of rock gods Led Zeppelin or hip-hop legends A Tribe Called Quest to techno beats, ambient choirs and Mozart's classic Magic Flute. A jury of expert tasted the cheeses on March 14, 2019 and the tasty winner the cheese matured with the hip-hop album. (Photo by Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP)
just for fun

Playing music to cheese improves its flavour, according to a Swiss study. But not just any music will do. Hip hop is where it’s at if you want really fruity cheese

NASA’s incredible supersonic jet surprise

CORRECTION - This handout colorized composite image released by NASA on March 5, 2019 shows two T-38 aircrafts flying in formation at supersonic speeds producing shockwaves that are typically heard on the ground as a sonic boom. - Using the schlieren photography technique, NASA was able to capture the first air-to-air images of the interaction of shockwaves from two supersonic aircraft flying in formation. Snapped by another plane flying at about 2,000 feet (610 m) above the two fast-moving aircraft, the images captured how the shock waves became distorted or curved as they interacted. "We never dreamt that it would be this clear, this beautiful," J.T. Heineck, a physical scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center in California, said in the statement. (Photo by HO / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS --- / “The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by HO has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [March 5] instead of [February 7]. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require.”
science

NASA has photographed supersonic waves from jets, which brings it a step closer to building a new plane that doesn’t produce a sonic boom when it breaks the sound barrier

Australians may be 120,000 years old

UNDATED : Copy of early undated image of central Australian aboriginals, similar to those who masterminded or were victims of strange ritual killings known as "kadaitcha. Aborigines
history

Scientists have discovered humans may have been living in Australia for 120,000 years. If proven right, the discovery could rewrite the indigenous history of our nation

New wallaby-sized Australian dinosaur found

A recreation of Galleonosaurus dorisae and its Cretaceous environment. Artist credit: James Kuether
animals

Millions of years before wallabies, a wallaby-sized dinosaur was running around a long-vanished valley between the continents we call Australia and Antarctica

Three disco-dancing peacock spiders found

Maratus aquilus. Picture: Joseph SchubertSource:Twitter
animals

An Australian citizen scientist has discovered three beautiful new species of disco-dancing peacock spiders. Arachnophobes needn’t worry: they’re the size of a grain of rice

Aussie vaccine a step closer to erasing malaria

SUNDAY MAIL ONLY : Malaria Vaccine Project. Malaria Vaccine
health

A world-first malaria vaccine made in Australia will be clinically* tested on humans in the hope it can erase the deadly disease and save millions of lives

Why do we need sleep?

happy kid girl waking up in the morning in her bedroom with dog in bed
explainers

Scientists know that we need sleep to survive but until now they didn’t know why. New research suggests it’s all to do with keeping up essential repairs

Superhero night vision for humans

Humans could one day have a superpower like X-men, Spiderman or Batman
science

Like Spider-Man and Batman, humans could one day have the power to see in the dark after scientists successfully tried their idea on mice

Australia’s record heat

SCORCHER: It's going to get hot in Mackay over the weekend, with a heatwave expected for the region.
weather

It’s been a blistering start to autumn with another heatwave across three states, just as we get through what has officially been the hottest summer on record

Scientists find giant bee thought to be extinct

TOPSHOT - This undated handout photomontage provided by Global Wildlife Conservation on February 21, 2019, shows a living Wallace’s giant bee (Megachile pluto) (R), which is approximately four times larger than a European honeybee, after it was rediscovered in the Indonesian islands of the North Moluccas. - The world's largest bee -- roughly the size of a human thumb -- has been rediscovered in a remote part of Indonesia in its first sighting in nearly 40 years, researchers said on February 21, 2019. Despite its conspicuous size, no one had observed Wallace's giant bee -- discovered in the 19th century by British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace and nicknamed the "flying bulldog" -- in the wild since 1981, the Global Wildlife Conservation said. (Photo by CLAY BOLT / Global Wildlife Conservation / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / GLOBAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION / CLAY BOLT" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - NO ARCHIVES
animals

Scientists have rediscovered a giant bee, nicknamed the ‘flying bulldog’, on a remote Indonesian island after thinking it had been extinct for 30 years

Neanderthal study rewrites history

An early illustration of the 'Man of Chapelle-aux-Saints' Neanderthal, showing him with a hunched back. Picture: Getty Images
history

Scientists who rearranged the bones of a famous Neanderthal skeleton discovered that much of what we believed about this species was based on a century-old mistake

Tiny baby boy goes home

A baby boy weighing 268 grams when born in August 2018, the hospital claims is the smallest baby to survive and be sent home healthy, is seen five days after his birth in Tokyo, Japan, in this undated handout photo released by Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and obtained Reuters on February 27, 2019. Mandatory credit Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics/Handout via Reuters
health

The world’s smallest baby boy has gone home from hospital, six months after being born weighing only 268g, one-thirteenth the weight of an average Australian baby

Whale found in Amazon jungle

Humpback whale dead in Amazon. Picture: Instagram/bicho_dagua
animals

Scientists have rushed to examine an 8m humpback whale found in thick mangroves in the Amazon jungle, a long way from its natural habitat

Scientists discover why zebras have stripes

RACING STRIPES
animals

It’s a question everyone asks — why do zebras have black-and-white stripes? Now scientists have found the answer and it’s all about blood-sucking insects and protection from diseases

Aussie floating rubbish bin cleans up oceans

Today, the first two full-time Seabins have splashed down in Sydney – one in Darling Harbour and one in the Parramatta River. This comes less than a year after the Seabin Project first demoed its ingenious floating rubbish bins in Australian waters. To date, the Australian-invented Seabin has over 435 Seabins collecting waterway pollutants in ports, marinas and yacht clubs around the world but no permanent ones in Australia until now. Picture Supplied - Rocket K
environment

Two Australians sick of seeing rubbish in the ocean identified a problem: there were rubbish bins on land but not in the water. So they invented a solution

‘Super Snow Moon’ shines bright

UK Sees Largest Supermoon Of 2019
space

World stargazers have enjoyed the sight of the biggest and brightest supermoon of the year. But if you missed it, don’t worry, there’s another one coming very soon

Rare baby otters pass first test

The Perth Zoo otter family now features nine individuals.Picture: Simon Santi
animals

Three rare otter pups have passed their first hands-on health checks by vets at Perth Zoo, a big milestone in the international program to save the species from extinction

Scientists discover cure for fear

Little boy afraid hiding behind his bed sheets and screaming
health

Australian researchers have discovered how to change parts of our DNA to help us switch off extreme fears and switch on more positive memories

NASA search for beginning of universe

The SphereX probe will explore the origins of the universe
space

A new NASA spacecraft to launch in 2023 will peer into the beginning of time to explore how the universe began and help in the search for alien life

Pandas may have to leave Australia

Update on Fu Ni
animals

Adelaide Zoo’s giant pandas Wang Wang and Fu Ni have failed to have a baby panda and will be sent back to China unless the Australian government steps in

Huge dinosaur tracks found in Queensland

Excavation teams have discovered Sauropod tracks near Winton, QLD. Drone image of the site.
animals

Detailed sauropod, ornithopod and theropod tracks 95 million years old have been discovered in a Queensland creekbed and will soon be safe from floods and on show to the public

World’s first wiggle found

Traces of mucus were discovered in ancient rock
science

Scientists have discovered what could be the earliest signs of movement on Earth by a living thing, beating the previous oldest find by 1.5 billion years

Our insects are in big trouble

Bugs
animals

The first major review of insect research has revealed the world’s insect populations are disappearing much faster than mammals, birds and reptiles

Ocean colours changing with global warming

An outbreak of blue-green algae is seen on the coastline of Qingdao, the host city for sailing events at the 2008 Olympic Games, in eastern China's Shandong province 24 Jun 2008. The Qingdao government has organized 400 boats and 3000 people to help remove the algae after Olympic organizers ordered a cleanup. Experts say the algae is a result of climate change, and recent heavy rains in southern China, according to the Xinhua news agency.
environment

Our blue oceans are turning bluer and our green oceans are turning greener as global warming changes the balance of Earth’s ecosystems

Mars rover named for DNA pioneer

Naming Ceremony Of The European Space Agency's ExoMars Rover
science

The Mars rover due to launch next year has been named after scientist Rosalind Franklin, who unlocked the secrets to human life

Bees know how to do basic maths

Bee and Honeycomb Bee and Honeycomb Bee and Honeycomb Bee and Honeycomb
mathematics

An Australian study has found that despite having tiny brains, bees can learn to add and subtract 

Teens win award for looking after nan

SCIENCEAWARD
technology

Two young Tasmanians have taken out Australia’s top student science award for an invention to keep Mitchell’s great-grandmother, Gwen, safe from a fall

True shape of Milky Way discovered

Artist's impression of the twisted Milky Way galaxy Credit: CHEN XIAODIAN
space

Australian scientists have helped make a 3D map of the Milky Way, using information sent back from a NASA space telescope. The results have surprised the world

Little mammals our bushfire heroes

28/11/2001. Moonlight Sanctuary at Pearcedale. An Eastern Bettong stares out of its hole whilst its baby stays back.
animals

A new study of Tasmania’s forests found that the many small native animals that live there have a vital role to play in reducing the impact of bushfires

Predicting drought and bushfires from space

Twin GRACE-FO satellites will follow each other in orbit around the Earth, separated by about 220 km. Picture: NASA
environment

Australian researchers have moved their focus to space to learn more about how to foresee and manage future droughts and bushfires on Earth

Drones to collect Antarctic whale poo

A supplied image obtained on Friday, January 18, 2019, shows an underwater shot of blue whale taken off coast of San Diego in the Pacific Ocean. (AAP Image, Mike Johnson/Australian Antarctic Division) NO ARCHING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY, STRICTLY NON COMMERCIAL USE AND ONE TIME USE ONLY
science

Scientists want to know whether the shape of massive Antarctic krill swarms affect how whales eat, poo and fertilise the ocean. Luckily, drones will do the dirty work

Meet our mysterious lost ancestors

MARCH, 2003 : Scene from BBC documentary TV series "Walking with Cavemen", 03/03. Prehistoric Man
history

Australian researchers are helping solve the mystery of an ancient tribe that once walked the Earth alongside Neanderthals and early humans

World’s rarest shark spotted by fishermen

The flat bodied angel shark is one of the world's rarest sharks.
animals

One of the world’s rarest sharks, the flat-bodied angel shark, has been spotted off the coast of Wales by a group of fishermen

Earth’s magnetic pole is in a hurry

mobile phone with gps and map in background
geography

The magnetic field of our planet is essential to our survival. But it’s not behaving like scientists expected and nobody knows why

Forests of underground zombie-like organisms

This undated handout photo courtesy of Gaetan Borgonie(Extreme Life Isyensya, Belgium, Deep Carbon Observatory, obtained December 10, 2018 shows a nematode (eukaryote) in a biofilm of microorganisms, an unidentified nematode (Poikilolaimus sp.) from Kopanang gold mine in South Africa,which lives 1.4 km below the surface. - About 70 percent of the Earth's microbes live in its depths, in rocks once considered barren but where bacteria and other unicellular organisms abound. For the first time, researchers have estimated the extent of this deep life or "intraterrestrial". Hundreds of international researchers who are members of the Deep Carbon Observatory - an in-depth carbon observatory - released on December 10, 2018 for the American Geophysics Summit in Washington, the sum of their work estimating that deep life represented a mass of 15 to 23 billion tons of carbon, 245 to 385 more than the seven billion people. (Photo by Gaetan BORGONIE / Gaetan BORGONIE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Gaetan Borgonie(Extreme Life Isyensya, Belgium/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS / TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY IVAN COURRONE AND KERRY SHERIDAN -"Life in Deep Earth Totals 15 to 23 Billion Tonnes of Carbon—Hundreds of Times More than Humans"
science

A 10-year team effort by hundreds of scientists has found massive underground forests of life, which could help us manage climate change and hold clues to life on other planets

Beach made of millions of pieces of ‘popcorn’

Popcorn Beach, Canary Islands, Spain. Picture: Instagram
just for fun

The internet’s latest sensation is a beach that looks like it’s made of popcorn. We find other incredible beaches around the world and explain what happens in nature to create them

Last Galapagos tortoise helping humans

Lonesome George, the last known individual of the Pinta Island Tortoise, subspecies Geochelone nigra abingdoni, walks around Galapagos National Park's breeding center in Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz island, in the Galapagos Archipelago, on April 19, 2012. Lonesome George died and left the world one subspecies poorer. The only remaining Pinta Island giant tortoise and celebrated symbol of conservation efforts in the Galapagos Islands passed away Sunday with no known offspring, the Galapagos National Park in Ecuador said in a statement. Estimated to be more than 100 years old, the creature's cause of death remains unclear and a necropsy is planned. AFP PHOTO/RODRIGO BUENDIA
science

Lonesome George was known as the rarest creature in the world, the last of his kind. But even after his death, the tortoise could hold the key to a long and healthy life for humans

Missing Aussie dinosaur toe found after 45 years

Artists impression of the only known South Australian dinosaur Kakuru kujani and size comparison to humans. Supplied. SA Museum
science

A woman accidentally bought the priceless, long-lost, opalised toe bone of South Australia’s only known dinosaur, a turkey-sized carnivorous creature that lived 110 million years ago

Sir David Attenborough’s climate change warning

Blue Planet II
environment

The world’s most famous environmentalist has used his position on the “people’s chair” at the UN climate meeting to warn of disaster on a global scale unless leaders act to slow climate change

How we tell the time just got more accurate

This photo released August 22, 2013, courtesy of the National Institute of Standards and Technology shows NIST's ultra-stable ytterbium lattice atomic clock. Ytterbium atoms are generated in an oven (large metal cylinder on the left) and sent to a vacuum chamber in the center of the photo to be manipulated and probed by lasers. Laser light is transported to the clock by five fibers (such as the yellow fiber in the lower center of the photo). A pair of experimental atomic clocks based on ytterbium atoms at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has set a new record for stability. The clocks act like 21st-century pendulums or metronomes that could swing back and forth with perfect timing for a period comparable to the age of the universe. NIST physicists report in the August 22, 2013 issue of Science Express that the ytterbium clocks' tick is more stable than any other atomic clock. Stability can be thought of as how precisely the duration of each tick matches every other tick. AFP PHOTO / NIST == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / NIST / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS ==
mathematics

Since the 1960s, the Earth’s time has run on 400 official clocks that we all use every day without even realising it. But a new kind of almost-perfect clock could change everything

Real unicorns walked alongside humans

An artist’s impression of the Elasmotherium. Picture: W. S. Van der Merwe Picture:Supplied
animals

Scientists know for sure that unicorns did exist. Advanced testing of a complete unicorn skull has provided a new understanding of why they became extinct, and it wasn’t humans’ fault

Mozzie bite breakthrough

A mosquito feeding on an unlucky person’s finger.Source:News Corp Australia
health

Scientists in Queensland have helped discover a gene that makes some people more likely to be bitten by a mosquito than others, bringing us a big step closer to knowing why

Definition of a kilogram about to change

In this photo taken Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018., a replica of the International Prototype Kilogram is pictured at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, in Sevres, near Paris. The golf ball-sized metal cylinder at the heart of the world's system for measuring mass is heading into retirement. Gathering this week in Versailles, west of Paris, governments on Friday Nov. 16, 2018, are expected to approve a plan to instead use a scientific formula to define the exact weight of a kilo. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
mathematics

Since 1889 we have weighed everything against a little cylinder of metal locked in a vault in France. Now, the world is about to agree to completely change the way it defines a kilogram

What is at the centre of the Earth?

*** Online Use Only / No Sales *** Cut-away diagram of the Earth's core. Stock File Artwork of the Earth's Core, Planet Earth. Picture: Getty Images *** Online Use Only / No Sales ***
explainers

We know if we dig a hole we won’t fall through to the other side of the world. Why? We explain what is deep, deep down below the ground and how that causes earthquakes and volcanoes

Yellowstone geyser spews historic rubbish

rainbow over geyser
science

Yellowstone National Park in the US is famous for its hot springs and geysers. But the recent eruption of one geyser sent years of rubbish high into the sky

Scientists discover ‘headless chicken monster’

Headless Chicken Monster
animals

Australian scientists exploring the depths of the Southern Ocean off Antarctica have filmed one of the weirdest sea creatures ever

Aussie medical invention will save lives

EMBARGO - EXCLUSIVE NETWORK CONTENT NO NEWS.COM, NO SKY, NO PERTH, NO AUSTRALIAN MeTro - A highly elastic and adhesive surgical glue that quickly seals wounds without the need for common staples or sutures could transform how surgeries are performed.
science

A revolutionary “wound glue” that could save lives on the battlefield, revolutionise surgery and help reduce scarring is ready to be tested on people

Giant bones change 4-legged dinosaur theory

Viktor Joseph Radermacher (R), paleontology artist and Masters student in vertebrate paleontology, and Professor Jonah Choiniere of the Evolutionary Studies Institute at the University of Witwatersrand talk about the illustrations done by Radermacher of the newly discovered species of dinosaur named Ledumahadi Mafube, at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, on October 03, 2018. (Photo by GULSHAN KHAN / AFP)
science

Early dinosaurs walked on two legs, but we have never known why they evolved to walk on four. A newly described species that “experimented” with walking on all fours could hold the answer

Large hole swallows part of Aussie beach

A supplied aerial image of a hole forming at Inskip Point near Rainbow Beach, Queensland, Monday, September 24, 2018. Another hole has swallowed part of a Queensland beach, not far from the spot where a similar hole engulfed vehicles and tents in 2015. (AAP Image/Supplied by Rainbow Beach Helicopters) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
environment

A large hole has appeared overnight and swallowed part of a popular Queensland beach at Inskip Point

Aussies identify world’s oldest animal life form

Organically preserved Dickinsonia fossil from the White Sea area of Russia.
science

Australian scientists have identified the world’s oldest animal life form from fossil fat. The find is so important it is being described as the Holy Grail of palaeontology

Cane toad mystery solved

Cane toads have adapted to life in sweltering northern Australia by altering their behaviour, say Aussie researchers. Rather than sleeping all day and rising only at night, which they’d normally do, the invasive pests get up and cool off in reservoirs, avoiding overheating while asleep
science

Scientists have worked out how to make a cane toad, which helps them figure out how to make a virus to control these poisonous pests. Have you ever seen a cane toad?

Kids find giant jellyfish

The New Zealand family soon discovered the creature was a lion's mane jellyfish, the largest species of jellyfish in existence. (Credit: Adam Dickinson)
animals

It was big, pink and very much alive and it’s been identified as a lion’s mane jellyfish, which can grow as big as a blue whale. Have you ever seen a weird sea creature?

Humans have four personality types — which one are you?

Thinking woman looking up at many question marks
science

Scientists have discovered people fit into four clear personality types — which one are you?

Reef pioneer honoured

Dorothy Hill was been honoured in this Google Doodle. Picture: Google
science

A pioneering Australian Great Barrier Reef scientist was honoured on Google yesterday in the form of a doodle. 

Humans on quest to live forever

dr who series 10
science

Humans don’t live forever, but many want to, so scientists are in a race against time to slow ageing and invent ways to regenerate, just like the Doctor in Doctor Who

Scientists hunting for WA meteor crash site

Perth. Picture: Twitter a abna a
space

Scientists are hunting for the crash site of a large meteor that flashed across the West Australian sky this week

Rising temperatures in colour

Supplied Prof Ed Hawkins warming stripes climate change visualisations - Global
environment

It looks like a piece of art, but it’s a picture of Australia’s average temperatures and shows it really is getting hotter

Hurry up science, we need this

Middle aged man distracted by phone when ironing burns shirt
science

It’s important research that could help the planet and it could stop parents complaining about ironing

Kangaroo-to-human tendon test

Alex Johnson of the Swans is seen after sustaining an injury during the Round 21 AFL match between the Melbourne Demons and the Sydney Swans at the MCG in Melbourne, Sunday, August 12, 2018. (AAP Image/Julian Smith) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
health

Kangaroos are amazingly athletic animals. Soon humans could benefit from some of that bounce with trials to begin on transplanting kangaroo tendon into human joints

Scientist Marie Curie is top of list

File photo dated 1925 of scientist Professor Marie Curie working in her laboratory at the University of Paris. P/L
science

If you’ve ever had an X-ray, you’ve benefited from the work of scientist Marie Curie, voted the most influential woman in history

NASA spacecraft zooming towards sun

This handout photo released by NASA shows the United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket with the Parker Solar Probe onboard during its launch on August 12, 2018, Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. - NASA postponed until August 12, 2018, the launch of the first ever spacecraft to fly directly toward the Sun on a mission to plunge into our star's sizzling atmosphere and unlock its mysteries. The reason for the delay was not immediately clear, but was called for after a gaseous helium alarm was sounded in the last moments before liftoff, officials said. (Photo by Bill INGALLS / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA / BILL INGALLS " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

A NASA spacecraft has zoomed towards the sun on a quest to get closer to our star than anything ever sent before

New Pooseum teaches us about poop

Zoo recycling
science

A new museum dedicated to animal dung has opened in Tasmania. The Pooseum is the idea of Karin Koch, who says we can learn a lot from the science of animal droppings

Prehistoric mega-shark teeth found at beach

Victorian fossil find uncovers prehistoric leftovers of colossal shark feast Size comparison chart
animals

Teacher finds rare fossilised teeth from 25 million-year-old prehistoric mega-shark at the beach

Denim jeans to repair knee joints

Deakin Institute for Frontier Materials researcher Dr Nolene Byrne with the with a sample of the denim-based aerogel. Picture: Donna Squire/ Supplied
health

In an incredible medical breakthrough, Australian scientists have found a way to repair knee joints with jeans, also helping to solve a big environmental problem

We are losing the war against superbugs

Superbug Danger
health

A new medical study finds we are losing the war against superbugs as they become resistant to alcohol-based hand sanitisers now common in hospitals

Big rain events getting bigger, faster

Driving at sunset
weather

An international study of 50 years of Australian rain storms finds they are getting more extreme faster than expected and we need to change our flood planning

Danger! You’re not using enough sunscreen

Mother putting sunscreen on young son at the beach
health

Scientists find sun lovers are risking skin cancer because they don’t use enough sunscreen for proper protection. So how much is enough?

Penguin population collapses

QLD_GCB_NEWS_PENGUINS_15FEB16(2)
animals

Last time scientists visited this island, it was crowded with around two million king penguins. Alarmingly, there aren’t many left but no one is sure what has happened

Black hole bends starlight

This artist's impression provided by the European Southern Observatory in July 2018 shows the path of the star S2 as it passes close to the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. As the star gets nearer to the black hole, a very strong gravitational field causes the color of the star to shift slightly to the red, an effect of Einstein's general theory of relativity. European researchers reported the results of their observations in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics on Thursday, July 26, 2018. (M. Kornmesser/ESO via AP)
science

Einstein was a genius whose ideas of light, energy, time, space and gravity were so advanced scientists are still trying to test them now by watching black holes

Hitchhiking frog crosses Nullarbor

Spotted Thighed Frog - endangered species amphibians frogs
animals

It’s pretty and it’s native to Western Australia, yet scientists fear that this canny frog is on its way to invading Australia

Massive Mars lake discovery

This image taken from the NASA Internet site 28 April, 2000 shows the south polar cap of Mars as it appeared to the Mars Global Surveyor on April 17, 2000. A massive underground lake has been detected for the first time on Mars, raising the possibility that more water -- and maybe even life -- exists there, international astronomers said on July 25, 2018. Located under a layer of Martian ice, the lake is about 12 miles (20 kilometers) wide, said the report led by Italian researchers in the US journal Science. / AFP PHOTO / NASA / HO / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

If there’s life on Mars, a 20km-wide lake will be the place to look. This huge body of water could also hold the key for cheaper, safer space travel

What’s in your bottled water?

ABC's War on Waste tested water
health

ABC TV’s War on Waste compared tap and bottled water and the results may surprise some who think they’re buying a healthier, higher-quality drink. 

Passenger rocket space test a success

This June 19, 2016 handout photograph obtained courtesy of Blue Origin shows the New Shepard booster landing during its fourth mission in an undisclosed place. The two companies leading the pack in the pursuit of space tourism say they are just months away from their first out-of-this-world passenger flights -- though neither has set a firm date. Virgin Galactic, founded by British billionaire Richard Branson, and Blue Origin, by Amazon creator Jeff Bezos, are racing to be the first to finish their tests -- with both companies using radically different technology. / AFP PHOTO / BLUE ORIGIN / Thom Baur / With AFP Story by Ivan COURONNE: First space tourist flights could come in 2019 == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / BLUE ORIGIN / THOM BAUR" / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS == /
space

The latest test flight of a passenger rocket brings us closer to being able to book a joy ride into space. Would you buy a ticket?

Scientists find new venomous snake species

A supplied image obtained Monday, July 16, 2018 of a newly discovered Vermicella Parscauda Bandy Bandy snake near Weipa, Queensland. The survival of a newly discovered snake found only in Queensland's far north is at risk from Rio Tinto's bauxite mine in Weipa, scientists say. (AAP Image/University of Queensland, Bryan Fry) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
animals

Scientists are in a race against time to find new species before they become extinct. A group of biologists have just had a big win, unexpectedly finding a new Australian snake species

New job for Australia’s first computer

Australia's first computer
technology

Australia’s first computer goes on display to inspire kids to be part of the next generation of scientists and innovators. Can you believe how big it is?

Turning plastic into something precious

Precious Plastic
environment

Australians are getting together in their backyards to turn the world’s plastic pollution into beautiful, valuable new things

Hypersonic jet to fly New York-London in two hours

Boeing unveils new hypersonic jet
science

Hypersonic jets that travel five times faster than the speed of sound could be taking passengers by 2030

Secret “dinosaur tree” experiment a success

Tourism Australia has launched a series of short films showcasing Australia's best nature experiences and wildlife. The Wildiaries National Landscapes Series is being launched in conjunction with Parks Australia. The National Landscapes program recognises places of great cultural, natural and spiritual significance including World Heritage-listed sites. Blue Mountains
science

Everyone thought this species was extinct and all we knew about it was from 200-million-year-old fossils. But an amazing discovery and a top-secret program mean the Wollemi pine will survive

Australian fossil named after Obama

Flinders ranges fossils named after Barack Obama and David Attenborough
science

Scientists have named two new Australian fossil discoveries after two of the world’s most famous science supporters — and for the resemblance to Barack Obama’s ears

Shortest day of the year is here

Belgrave Lantern Parade
weather

This is the time of the year it’s dark morning and night. For centuries that’s been a cause for celebration. How would you like to celebrate winter solstice?