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Science

Close-up Of Woman Losing His Wallet

Lost wallet study finds people care about others

humanities

Researchers “lost” 17,000 wallets across 355 cities in 40 countries in a social experiment that showed people are more likely to return it if it contains money

Supplied Editorial giant squid

Giant squid attacks fake jellyfish near midnight zone

animals

A terrifying looking creature with one massive eye, three hearts, blue blood and moving by jet propulsion has been filmed lurking deep underwater in complete darkness

Massive Indonesian earthquake rocks Darwin

science

A 7.2-magnitude Indonesian earthquake — the largest in a decade — has rocked Darwin and forced residents to flee office buildings and hospitals

Latest

Australian man’s world-first skin transplant

World First Burns Treatment
health

South Australian burns survivor Glenn Ogg owes his renewed life to a world-first skin transplant technique developed in Adelaide that involves “farming” new skin from his own skin

Melting ice leaves sled dogs walking on water

weather

A photo of a pack of sled dogs appearing to walk on water in Greenland has shocked the world, showing the result of a massive ice melt on an unusually warm day last week

Massive Australian spider eats a whole possum

animals

If you hate spiders, don’t click on this. But if you’re fascinated by Australia’s enormous creepy crawly carnivorous predators, then this is definitely a Kids News story for you

Humans can’t resist those sad, puppy dog eyes

Teckel puppy dog portrait
animals

New research shows dogs have special muscles above their eyes that have developed over thousands of years of humans domesticating dogs. Wolves can’t make the same sad-eye face

All you need to know about hair

Two smiling chimpanzees sitting on a tree with arms crossed
explainers

The longest arm hair ever recorded was 21.7cm, but that’s not the norm. Though human head hair keeps growing, human body hair doesn’t. We look at how and why there’s a difference

Hairy, scary, frozen Ice Age wolf head found

howling wolves
animals

The head of a giant wolf that would have roamed the land alongside woolly mammoths has been found in Siberia, complete with perfectly preserved brain, shaggy hair and fierce teeth

Lego’s big search for plant-based plastic

The 15 famous LEGO pine trees and several flower sets have been recreated and supersized to be 66 times bigger. The LEGO trees are now located at Dunningham Reserve, Coogee and marks the 50th anniversary of the LEGO brick in Australia. Picture: Brad Hunter
environment

Bricks made from corn were too soft and wheat-based bricks didn’t absorb colour evenly or have enough shine, but toymaker Lego is still trying to switch to plant-based plastic

How to become your own snot detective

explainers

Winter is here and that means a lot of noticeable snot being sneezed, blown and dripped from noses all around us. We look at what snot is and what it can tell us about our health

Jupiter, the brilliant jewel in our night sky

space

It’s time to rug up and look up at the night sky for a spectacular view of Jupiter, our solar system’s biggest planet. It’s as close as it gets to Earth and you don’t need a telescope to see it

NASA welcomes holiday-makers to space

space

The International Space Station is about to become the latest holiday destination with the first tourists blasting off next year. A ticket will cost about $83 million, air included

The mystery of the ‘monster’s’ invisible teeth

The deep-sea creature's teeth are transparent underwater. Picture: AP
animals

Scientists have solved the mystery of the invisible teeth of the monstrous, ferocious, glow-in-the-dark dragonfish that lives in the dark in the deepest parts of the ocean

Entire herd of dinosaurs found in Australia

animals

Scientists have been stunned after an entire herd of 100-million-year-old dinosaurs was discovered in Lightning Ridge in outback Australia

Two big volcanoes are erupting

science

Two of the world’s most active volcanoes are erupting, just as the most active volcano goes quiet. Kids News looks at how volcanoes erupt and where these three sit on the Earth’s crust

Where is Migaloo, the famous white whale?

animals

As whale watching season begins in Australia, everyone is on the lookout for a very special white humpback whale who has been cruising the east coast every year for up to 30 years

Floodwater is filling Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre

geography

Lake Eyre is approaching its fullest state in more than 40 years, with the huge flow of water catching the attention of birds, pilots, tourists and even NASA

‘Forbidden’ exoplanet discovered in space

Neptune is the fourth biggest planet in our Solar System
space

Scientists have discovered a planet the size of Neptune that could instantly vaporise humans. It’s in the Neptunian Desert, where it shouldn’t be able to survive

Australian-first dolphin happiness study

Jet the dolphin (rear) with his mother at Pet Porpoise Pool in Coffs Harbour, NSW.
animals

Bucky, Calamity, Bella, Zippy and Jet the dolphins are the subjects of an Australian-first study to discover if they are happier in their pool or in a sea pen

Scientists make loudest underwater sound

science

To find out what loud sounds do to things, scientists have fired lasers into jets of water, making a sound so loud it can boil water and burst your heart

NASA confirms meteorite the size of a small car

space

A fireball that lit up the night sky and created a rumble like and earthquake in recent days has been confirmed as a high-energy meteorite exploding in Earth’s atmosphere

Australian teen inventor stars in YouTube Story

GG
science

YouTube has chosen an Australian teenage inventor to feature in a special documentary about her work and her potentially lifesaving creation and now the whole world is watching

Australia to get Eden Project at former coal mine

environment

The creators of the world’s biggest indoor rainforest have unveiled their plans to build a massive international eco-tourism attraction on mining wasteland in Australia

Biggest cave in the world just got bigger

World's Largest Cave - Han Son Doong
geography

A newly discovered tunnel inside the world’s biggest cave linking it to another big cave has been described as like finding another 1km-high lump on the top of Mount Everest

Baby giraffe’s special new shoes

The baby stands next to mom, Olivia, in the giraffe barn after the team outfitted him with new therapeutic shoes and casts.Picture: Woodland
animals

Hasani was born with wonky back legs, so everyone at his zoo worked together to make a pair of strong shoes to help the giraffe walk until he’s as good as new

Our paradise islands polluted with plastic

environment

The world may be seriously underestimating the amount of plastic waste along its coastlines, according to researchers who studied Australia’s Cocos Islands

Billionaire reveals space cities to house a trillion people

Jeff Bezos reckons his private space firm Blue Origins will one day help to build enormous space habitats for humans Credit: BLUE ORIGIN
space

The world’s richest person has unveiled his plans to colonise space with huge, floating, rotating habitats holding cities, farmland and even national parks

Exploring Minecraft’s new Australian city

A look at 'mini Melbourne' built in the Minecraft video game. Federation Square
technology

Dig for false teeth, look for drop bears and search for wildlife in a new Minecraft mini Melbourne to learn about science, maths, archaeology and engineering

Diver breaks record with deepest submarine trip

In among the prawn-like creatures, diver Victor Vescovo also found pollution. Picture: Discovery Channel/Deep PlanetSource:Supplied
geography

Piles of lolly wrappers and other human-made rubbish marred the excitement of a record-breaking dive in a submarine to the bottom of the world’s deepest ocean

What causes hail and is it dangerous?

MUST CREDIT: Sandy Robinson Cricket ball-sized hail fell at Athol, near Toowoomba, this afternoon about 2.38pm. The storm lasted about 20-30 minutes.
explainers

After a freak hailstorm turned a sandy beach into a sea of white, we look at what causes hail and if it’s dangerous for humans to get caught in it

Zoo poo test puts glitter in kitty litter

Two lions, part of the pride at Werribee Open Range Zoo, Victoria. Picture: Zoos Victoria
animals

Big cat keepers are feeding lions glitter. But it’s not because anyone is having a party. It’s a safe and stress-free way to check a lion’s poo and their health

Extinction alert for one million species

TOPSHOT - Graffiti artwork, suspected to have been created by the British street artist Banksy, is pictured opposite the environmental protest group Extinction Rebellion's camp at Marble Arch in London on April 26, 2019. (Photo by ISABEL INFANTES / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION
environment

Report says one million animal and plant species are at risk of becoming extinct because humans won’t put saving the Earth ahead of making money

Superheroes here to save you from your fears

Miles Morales (Shameik Moore) Columbia Pictures and Sony Pictures Animation's SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE.
health

Spider-Man and Ant-man to the rescue! Scientists have discovered that watching superhero movies could help cure people of their phobias of spiders and ants

Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest hits

Supplied Editorial
history

Five centuries since he lived, people still can’t believe how smart inventor, artist, scientist, mathematician, thinker and tech whiz Leonardo da Vinci was

Ancient jawbone solves mountain puzzle

A handout photo made available by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology on May 1, 2019 shows a view of the virtual reconstruction of the Xiahe mandible after digital removal of the adhering carbonate crust, which was found in 1980 in Baishiya Karst Cave. - The mandible is so well preserved that it allows for a virtual reconstruction of the two sides of the mandible. The Denisovan mandible likely represents the earliest hominin fossil on the Tibetan Plateau. (Photo by Jean-Jacques HUBLIN / the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology / Jean-Jacques HUBLIN" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
science

A jawbone found in Tibet of an ancient cousin of humans from at least 160,000 years ago proves humans adapted to live at high altitude far earlier than we thought

Kids News explainer: What is drought?

Dust storm in Junee NSW 5th of March 2019 Must credit @thepastyfarmer permission for use given. from source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BunkgrGA3bZ/
explainers

May is likely to be drier than average for most of eastern Australia, which is bad news for the large parts of the country in drought

Scurvy making a comeback due to poor diets

Scurvy
health

A serious but easily preventable disease we associate with sailors on long voyages hundreds of years ago is making people sick in modern-day Australia

Antarctica’s emperor penguins go missing

Emperor Penguins in Antarctica
animals

Scientists thought Antarctica’s Halley Bay would be a refuge from global warming for emperor penguins, but many breeding pairs are already missing

Baby koala saved in world-first operation

Hermit snuggling into Crumble. Picture: Lone Pine Sanctuary
animals

Hermit the joey koala has been saved by a vet and a surrogate koala mother named Crumble in a daring medical procedure at an Australian wildlife sanctuary

Why does lightning strike the same place twice?

Bright lightning illuminates dark cloudy sky during a thunderstorm. Natural dangers and majestic beauty. Real cloudscape with computer generated lightning. Copy space on image side.
explainers

Using a special telescope invented by an Australian, scientists have looked inside thunderclouds to understand how and why lightning often strikes a place twice

3D printer making recycled plastic fantastic

This is one of the prosthetic hands that will be 3D printed using waste plastic.
technology

An Australian hairdresser is turning plastic shampoo bottles into 3D-printed prosthetic limbs, helping repurpose waste and giving a hand to those who need one

World’s first photo of a black hole revealed

A handout photo provided by the European Southern Observatory on April 10, 2019 shows the first photograph of a black hole and its fiery halo, released by Event Horizon Telescope astronomers (EHT), which is the "most direct proof of their existence," one of the project's lead scientists told AFP. (Photo by - / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

A team of more than 200 scientists has worked together to capture the world’s first photograph of a black hole, a phenomenon never-before seen by humans

What is chocolate and is it good for you?

Delicious chocolate Easter bunny, eggs and sweets on rustic backgroundDelicious chocolate Easter bunny and eggs on rustic background
just for fun

Almost everyone is mad about chocolate and not just at Easter. Ahead of the annual chocolate feast, we set out to answer some of the most asked questions about this special treat

Mind-control brain implant trials to begin

Generic image of human brain at work. Picture: Thinkstock
health

An Australian hospital has approved a world-first human trial of a brain implant to help people with advanced diseases of the nervous system communicate via mind control

Ancient four-legged whale walked on land

the ancient four-legged whale in the sea
animals

Scientists have uncovered fossils of an ancient four-legged whale that walked on land and swam in the sea 43 million year ago

NASA solar probe starts flying into the Sun

the Parker Space Probe near the Sun. Artist's impression. Supplied: NASA
space

The Parker Solar Probe is on a groundbreaking mission to ‘touch the Sun’ and has now come closer to our nearest star than any other man-made object in history

Australia’s surprising supermum skink

A supplied image obtained on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, shows a baby three-toed skink hatches from an egg. Researchers at the University of Sydney have observed a three-toed skink who gave birth to eggs followed by a live baby three weeks later from the same pregnancy. (AAP Image/Nadav Pezaro) NO ARCHIVING
animals

Scientists have called a three-toed skink one of the weirdest lizards in the world after watching it lay eggs and then give birth to a baby, all in one litter

Beware of wild mushrooms

NEWS: Toadstools
health

Autumn weather means more mushrooms and other fungi growing in the wild, but as it’s almost impossible to tell which ones are deadly, avoid them all to stay safe

Mars house plans revealed

3D-printed towers may be used by Nasa to house its astronauts on Mars (artist's impression) Credit: NASA
space

It’s been a big week for our quest to live on Mars, with the confirmation of a “burp” of methane gas and NASA’s release of designs for human housing on the red planet

Extreme surfers invent iceboard surfing

Swedish surfer Pontus Hallin waits for waves as he sits on his melting ice surfboard at the Delp surfing spot, near Straumnes, in the Lofoten Islands, over the Arctic Circle on February 18, 2019. (AFP / Olivier Morin)
just for fun

Surfers have a lot of time to think about the health of the world’s oceans when they’re out there waiting for a wave, so these surfers invented the ultimate eco-friendly surfboard

‘Temporary’ Eiffel Tower turns 130

Eiffel Tower with autumn leaves in Paris, France
history

The much-loved, world-famous symbol of Paris has turned 130, after surviving fierce early criticism and an original plan to take it down after just 20 years

The massive mako shark mystery

A mako shark spotted at Browns Mountain, a sea mountain off the Sydney coastline in an area where a large collection of sea life congregate. The mako had a fishing line attached from a previous catch and release and was attracted by burley designed to attract fish to the boat.
animals

An Australian fisherman pulled in what he thought was an enormous shark, only to find it was just the head. His gruesome discovery has intrigued the world

Fossil graveyard a snapshot of asteroid hit

Computer generated simulation shows an asteroid striking thre Earth in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula aropund 150 million years ago.The extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago can be traced to a collision between two monster rocks in the asteroid belt nearly 100 million years earlier, scientists report 05 September 2007. TO GO WITH AFP STORY-Traced: The asteroid breakup that wiped out the dinosaurs by Richard Ingham AFP PHOTO RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE/NO SALES/NO INTERNET/ NO ARCHIVES
science

Scientists have discovered a fossilised snapshot of the day a huge asteroid slammed into Earth 66 million years ago, clearing the way for humans to thrive

World’s biggest T-rex unearthed

Chris Pratt faces a rampaging T-Rex dinosaur in a scene from film Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
animals

A massive, fierce dinosaur nicknamed Scotty has been dug from sandstone. Its leg bones are so big it is thought to have weighed 8800kg when it roamed the Earth

Big win in fight against extinction

Plains-wanderer chicks at Werribee Open Range Zoo. Picture: Zoos Victoria
animals

A heat lamp, a feather duster and lots of expert care has helped nine precious plains-wanderer chicks hatch and thrive, an important species-saving step

Astronauts take six-hour space walk

This image provided by NASA shows astronauts Anne McClain and Nick Hague taking a spacewalk to replace aging batteries on the International Space Station on Friday, March 22, 2019. Friday’s spacewalk is the first of three planned excursions to replace batteries and perform other maintenance. (NASA via AP)
space

Two NASA astronauts took a walk out in space for more than six hours to change some batteries on Friday. They finished early, so had time for some cleaning and sightseeing

Rare albino penguin comes out to play

In this image made from video, an albino penguin is seen along in its enclosure in Gdansk zoo, Gdansk, Poland, Friday, March 22, 2019. An extremely rare white penguin has made its public debut at the Gdansk zoo in northern Poland. The albino penguin hatched in mid-December and has been under veterinary care. In natural conditions such unusual-looking penguin would be rejected by other penguins and would have little chance of survival. (AP Photo)
animals

A rare albino penguin has made its first public appearance at a Polish zoo. Normally other penguins reject albinos, but this bird is feeling the love from its parents and two special friends

Quest to bring woolly mammoths back to life

Woolly Mammoth Family
science

Experiments on the cells of a woolly mammoth found preserved in frozen ground has brought scientists a step closer to bringing the prehistoric creatures back to life

Incredible video of snake eating snake

The larger snake eating the smaller snake
animals

An Australian woman has filmed extraordinary video of a fight to the death of two snakes of different species, with one getting a big meal for its efforts

Big fish catches fishermen by surprise

Hunter and Steven Jones with a Sunfish found on the Coorong over the weekend. Picture: Jacob Jones
animals

A group of friends thought they saw a massive rock on the sand, but we now know it was an ocean sunfish, one of the world’s biggest fish and very rare in these waters

Australia to build state-of-the-art space centre

ESCAPE: Houston NASA, Amanda Woods - part of the comprehensive spacesuit collection . Picture: Space Center Houston.
space

If humans land on Mars or walk on the Moon again, Australians could watch it live at a state-of-the-art mission control centre, which the government plans to build in Adelaide

Hip hop makes cheese taste great

Swiss cheesemaker Beat Wampfler smells a piece of cheese that has been matured for 6 month with hip-hop music on the final day of an experiment conducted by the University of the Arts in Bern on March 14, 2019 in Berthoud, in the Emmental region, central Switzerland. - Beat Wampfler, a Swiss veterinarian by day, but consumate apron-wearing cheese enthusiast at night, has embarked on an experiment to test the impact of music on Emmental. Since last September, the cheeses have each been blasted with sonic masterpieces from the likes of rock gods Led Zeppelin or hip-hop legends A Tribe Called Quest to techno beats, ambient choirs and Mozart's classic Magic Flute. A jury of expert tasted the cheeses on March 14, 2019 and the tasty winner the cheese matured with the hip-hop album. (Photo by Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP)
just for fun

Playing music to cheese improves its flavour, according to a Swiss study. But not just any music will do. Hip hop is where it’s at if you want really fruity cheese

NASA’s incredible supersonic jet surprise

CORRECTION - This handout colorized composite image released by NASA on March 5, 2019 shows two T-38 aircrafts flying in formation at supersonic speeds producing shockwaves that are typically heard on the ground as a sonic boom. - Using the schlieren photography technique, NASA was able to capture the first air-to-air images of the interaction of shockwaves from two supersonic aircraft flying in formation. Snapped by another plane flying at about 2,000 feet (610 m) above the two fast-moving aircraft, the images captured how the shock waves became distorted or curved as they interacted. "We never dreamt that it would be this clear, this beautiful," J.T. Heineck, a physical scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center in California, said in the statement. (Photo by HO / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS --- / “The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by HO has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [March 5] instead of [February 7]. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require.”
science

NASA has photographed supersonic waves from jets, which brings it a step closer to building a new plane that doesn’t produce a sonic boom when it breaks the sound barrier

Australians may be 120,000 years old

UNDATED : Copy of early undated image of central Australian aboriginals, similar to those who masterminded or were victims of strange ritual killings known as "kadaitcha. Aborigines
history

Scientists have discovered humans may have been living in Australia for 120,000 years. If proven right, the discovery could rewrite the indigenous history of our nation

New wallaby-sized Australian dinosaur found

A recreation of Galleonosaurus dorisae and its Cretaceous environment. Artist credit: James Kuether
animals

Millions of years before wallabies, a wallaby-sized dinosaur was running around a long-vanished valley between the continents we call Australia and Antarctica

Three disco-dancing peacock spiders found

Maratus aquilus. Picture: Joseph SchubertSource:Twitter
animals

An Australian citizen scientist has discovered three beautiful new species of disco-dancing peacock spiders. Arachnophobes needn’t worry: they’re the size of a grain of rice

Aussie vaccine a step closer to erasing malaria

SUNDAY MAIL ONLY : Malaria Vaccine Project. Malaria Vaccine
health

A world-first malaria vaccine made in Australia will be clinically* tested on humans in the hope it can erase the deadly disease and save millions of lives

Why do we need sleep?

happy kid girl waking up in the morning in her bedroom with dog in bed
explainers

Scientists know that we need sleep to survive but until now they didn’t know why. New research suggests it’s all to do with keeping up essential repairs

Superhero night vision for humans

Humans could one day have a superpower like X-men, Spiderman or Batman
science

Like Spider-Man and Batman, humans could one day have the power to see in the dark after scientists successfully tried their idea on mice

Australia’s record heat

SCORCHER: It's going to get hot in Mackay over the weekend, with a heatwave expected for the region.
weather

It’s been a blistering start to autumn with another heatwave across three states, just as we get through what has officially been the hottest summer on record

Scientists find giant bee thought to be extinct

TOPSHOT - This undated handout photomontage provided by Global Wildlife Conservation on February 21, 2019, shows a living Wallace’s giant bee (Megachile pluto) (R), which is approximately four times larger than a European honeybee, after it was rediscovered in the Indonesian islands of the North Moluccas. - The world's largest bee -- roughly the size of a human thumb -- has been rediscovered in a remote part of Indonesia in its first sighting in nearly 40 years, researchers said on February 21, 2019. Despite its conspicuous size, no one had observed Wallace's giant bee -- discovered in the 19th century by British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace and nicknamed the "flying bulldog" -- in the wild since 1981, the Global Wildlife Conservation said. (Photo by CLAY BOLT / Global Wildlife Conservation / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / GLOBAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION / CLAY BOLT" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - NO ARCHIVES
animals

Scientists have rediscovered a giant bee, nicknamed the ‘flying bulldog’, on a remote Indonesian island after thinking it had been extinct for 30 years

Neanderthal study rewrites history

An early illustration of the 'Man of Chapelle-aux-Saints' Neanderthal, showing him with a hunched back. Picture: Getty Images
history

Scientists who rearranged the bones of a famous Neanderthal skeleton discovered that much of what we believed about this species was based on a century-old mistake

Tiny baby boy goes home

A baby boy weighing 268 grams when born in August 2018, the hospital claims is the smallest baby to survive and be sent home healthy, is seen five days after his birth in Tokyo, Japan, in this undated handout photo released by Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and obtained Reuters on February 27, 2019. Mandatory credit Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics/Handout via Reuters
health

The world’s smallest baby boy has gone home from hospital, six months after being born weighing only 268g, one-thirteenth the weight of an average Australian baby

Whale found in Amazon jungle

Humpback whale dead in Amazon. Picture: Instagram/bicho_dagua
animals

Scientists have rushed to examine an 8m humpback whale found in thick mangroves in the Amazon jungle, a long way from its natural habitat

Scientists discover why zebras have stripes

RACING STRIPES
animals

It’s a question everyone asks — why do zebras have black-and-white stripes? Now scientists have found the answer and it’s all about blood-sucking insects and protection from diseases

Aussie floating rubbish bin cleans up oceans

Today, the first two full-time Seabins have splashed down in Sydney – one in Darling Harbour and one in the Parramatta River. This comes less than a year after the Seabin Project first demoed its ingenious floating rubbish bins in Australian waters. To date, the Australian-invented Seabin has over 435 Seabins collecting waterway pollutants in ports, marinas and yacht clubs around the world but no permanent ones in Australia until now. Picture Supplied - Rocket K
environment

Two Australians sick of seeing rubbish in the ocean identified a problem: there were rubbish bins on land but not in the water. So they invented a solution

‘Super Snow Moon’ shines bright

UK Sees Largest Supermoon Of 2019
space

World stargazers have enjoyed the sight of the biggest and brightest supermoon of the year. But if you missed it, don’t worry, there’s another one coming very soon

Rare baby otters pass first test

The Perth Zoo otter family now features nine individuals.Picture: Simon Santi
animals

Three rare otter pups have passed their first hands-on health checks by vets at Perth Zoo, a big milestone in the international program to save the species from extinction

Scientists discover cure for fear

Little boy afraid hiding behind his bed sheets and screaming
health

Australian researchers have discovered how to change parts of our DNA to help us switch off extreme fears and switch on more positive memories

NASA search for beginning of universe

The SphereX probe will explore the origins of the universe
space

A new NASA spacecraft to launch in 2023 will peer into the beginning of time to explore how the universe began and help in the search for alien life

Pandas may have to leave Australia

Update on Fu Ni
animals

Adelaide Zoo’s giant pandas Wang Wang and Fu Ni have failed to have a baby panda and will be sent back to China unless the Australian government steps in

Huge dinosaur tracks found in Queensland

Excavation teams have discovered Sauropod tracks near Winton, QLD. Drone image of the site.
animals

Detailed sauropod, ornithopod and theropod tracks 95 million years old have been discovered in a Queensland creekbed and will soon be safe from floods and on show to the public

World’s first wiggle found

Traces of mucus were discovered in ancient rock
science

Scientists have discovered what could be the earliest signs of movement on Earth by a living thing, beating the previous oldest find by 1.5 billion years

Our insects are in big trouble

Bugs
animals

The first major review of insect research has revealed the world’s insect populations are disappearing much faster than mammals, birds and reptiles

Ocean colours changing with global warming

An outbreak of blue-green algae is seen on the coastline of Qingdao, the host city for sailing events at the 2008 Olympic Games, in eastern China's Shandong province 24 Jun 2008. The Qingdao government has organized 400 boats and 3000 people to help remove the algae after Olympic organizers ordered a cleanup. Experts say the algae is a result of climate change, and recent heavy rains in southern China, according to the Xinhua news agency.
environment

Our blue oceans are turning bluer and our green oceans are turning greener as global warming changes the balance of Earth’s ecosystems

Mars rover named for DNA pioneer

Naming Ceremony Of The European Space Agency's ExoMars Rover
science

The Mars rover due to launch next year has been named after scientist Rosalind Franklin, who unlocked the secrets to human life

Bees know how to do basic maths

mathematics

An Australian study has found that despite having tiny brains, bees can learn to add and subtract 

Teens win award for looking after nan

SCIENCEAWARD
technology

Two young Tasmanians have taken out Australia’s top student science award for an invention to keep Mitchell’s great-grandmother, Gwen, safe from a fall

True shape of Milky Way discovered

Artist's impression of the twisted Milky Way galaxy Credit: CHEN XIAODIAN
space

Australian scientists have helped make a 3D map of the Milky Way, using information sent back from a NASA space telescope. The results have surprised the world

Little mammals our bushfire heroes

28/11/2001. Moonlight Sanctuary at Pearcedale. An Eastern Bettong stares out of its hole whilst its baby stays back.
animals

A new study of Tasmania’s forests found that the many small native animals that live there have a vital role to play in reducing the impact of bushfires

Predicting drought and bushfires from space

Twin GRACE-FO satellites will follow each other in orbit around the Earth, separated by about 220 km. Picture: NASA
environment

Australian researchers have moved their focus to space to learn more about how to foresee and manage future droughts and bushfires on Earth

Drones to collect Antarctic whale poo

A supplied image obtained on Friday, January 18, 2019, shows an underwater shot of blue whale taken off coast of San Diego in the Pacific Ocean. (AAP Image, Mike Johnson/Australian Antarctic Division) NO ARCHING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY, STRICTLY NON COMMERCIAL USE AND ONE TIME USE ONLY
science

Scientists want to know whether the shape of massive Antarctic krill swarms affect how whales eat, poo and fertilise the ocean. Luckily, drones will do the dirty work

Meet our mysterious lost ancestors

MARCH, 2003 : Scene from BBC documentary TV series "Walking with Cavemen", 03/03. Prehistoric Man
history

Australian researchers are helping solve the mystery of an ancient tribe that once walked the Earth alongside Neanderthals and early humans

World’s rarest shark spotted by fishermen

The flat bodied angel shark is one of the world's rarest sharks.
animals

One of the world’s rarest sharks, the flat-bodied angel shark, has been spotted off the coast of Wales by a group of fishermen

Earth’s magnetic pole is in a hurry

mobile phone with gps and map in background
geography

The magnetic field of our planet is essential to our survival. But it’s not behaving like scientists expected and nobody knows why

Forests of underground zombie-like organisms

This undated handout photo courtesy of Gaetan Borgonie(Extreme Life Isyensya, Belgium, Deep Carbon Observatory, obtained December 10, 2018 shows a nematode (eukaryote) in a biofilm of microorganisms, an unidentified nematode (Poikilolaimus sp.) from Kopanang gold mine in South Africa,which lives 1.4 km below the surface. - About 70 percent of the Earth's microbes live in its depths, in rocks once considered barren but where bacteria and other unicellular organisms abound. For the first time, researchers have estimated the extent of this deep life or "intraterrestrial". Hundreds of international researchers who are members of the Deep Carbon Observatory - an in-depth carbon observatory - released on December 10, 2018 for the American Geophysics Summit in Washington, the sum of their work estimating that deep life represented a mass of 15 to 23 billion tons of carbon, 245 to 385 more than the seven billion people. (Photo by Gaetan BORGONIE / Gaetan BORGONIE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Gaetan Borgonie(Extreme Life Isyensya, Belgium/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS / TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY IVAN COURRONE AND KERRY SHERIDAN -"Life in Deep Earth Totals 15 to 23 Billion Tonnes of Carbon—Hundreds of Times More than Humans"
science

A 10-year team effort by hundreds of scientists has found massive underground forests of life, which could help us manage climate change and hold clues to life on other planets

Beach made of millions of pieces of ‘popcorn’

Popcorn Beach, Canary Islands, Spain. Picture: Instagram
just for fun

The internet’s latest sensation is a beach that looks like it’s made of popcorn. We find other incredible beaches around the world and explain what happens in nature to create them

Last Galapagos tortoise helping humans

Lonesome George, the last known individual of the Pinta Island Tortoise, subspecies Geochelone nigra abingdoni, walks around Galapagos National Park's breeding center in Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz island, in the Galapagos Archipelago, on April 19, 2012. Lonesome George died and left the world one subspecies poorer. The only remaining Pinta Island giant tortoise and celebrated symbol of conservation efforts in the Galapagos Islands passed away Sunday with no known offspring, the Galapagos National Park in Ecuador said in a statement. Estimated to be more than 100 years old, the creature's cause of death remains unclear and a necropsy is planned. AFP PHOTO/RODRIGO BUENDIA
science

Lonesome George was known as the rarest creature in the world, the last of his kind. But even after his death, the tortoise could hold the key to a long and healthy life for humans

Missing Aussie dinosaur toe found after 45 years

Artists impression of the only known South Australian dinosaur Kakuru kujani and size comparison to humans. Supplied. SA Museum
science

A woman accidentally bought the priceless, long-lost, opalised toe bone of South Australia’s only known dinosaur, a turkey-sized carnivorous creature that lived 110 million years ago