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L-r Sophie Orgill, 17, yr 12, Erin Ellis, 13, yr 7 and Isabella Osborn, 13, yr 8.
Research showing girls from single-sex schools are more mentally tough than boys and girls at co-ed schools. Picture: Jason Edwards

Girls do better without boys

humanities

Girls from single-sex schools are mentally tougher than those who learn with boys, an international study has found

Mark Knight cartoon for Tuesday 20th of July 21 Herald Sun Newspaper

Vic and NSW lockdown styles in the spotlight

health

With 13 million Australians in Covid lockdown, cartoonist Mark Knight reckons the different approach taken by the leaders of our two most populated states is a bit like a famous movie scene

Artist’s impression of a neutron star and black hole about to merge. Credit: Carl Knox, OzGrav-Swinburne University

Black hole swallows neutron star

space

Astronomers have for the first time witnessed the collision of a black hole and a neutron star, with Australian scientists playing a leading role in the discovery

Latest

Caterpillar venom could be used to make medicine

The caterpillar of the mottled cup moth, Doratifera  vulnerans, which is commonly found in eastern Australia, has been found by University of Queensland researchers to have a complex venom that could be used to make medicines and pest control. Picture: Jiayi Jin, University of Queensland
animals

It might deliver a nasty sting, but the venom of this common Australian caterpillar could be used to fight diseases in humans and livestock

Barnaby Joyce rams aside Nats leader

Mark Knight cartoon for Tuesday 22nd of June 2021 Herald Sun Newspaper 
civics

Cartoonist Mark Knight saw similarities between politics and the farmyard when Barnaby Joyce ousted National Party leader Michael McCormack and became our new Deputy Prime Minister

Dinos illustrate Covid challenge

Mark Knight cartoon for Kids News
health

What does the age of the dinosaurs have in common with our modern coronavirus challenge? Mark Knight explains why he combined the two in his latest cartoon for Kids News

Say goodbye to needles with vaccine patch

The UQ research team, featuring (foreground, L-R) Dr Chris McMillan, Dr David Muller, (background, L-R) Dr Alberto Amarilla, Dr Naphak Modhiran Ortiz and Ms Jovin Choo.
science

We could soon be giving ourselves Covid vaccines without the need for a doctor, nurse or needle, thanks to a “game changing” discovery by Australian scientists

Perfect pairing of pandemic symptoms

Mark Knight's cartoon, vaccine and toilet paper
humanities

We’ve been well informed about the effects of the coronavirus on people, but Mark Knight observes two other symptoms appearing together during the latest Victorian lockdown

How to make a pen pal with purpose

KIDS NEWS The Sunshine Initiative, b kinder day, Fly High Billie. Keith Petersen, Principal Junior School with Arndell Anglican College students who sent cards from Australia to Woodville Primary in the UK to cheer up the students there after a tough time through Covid-19. Picture: supplied.
civics

Children’s charity Fly High Billie invites Aussie kids to write to students in Covid hotspots abroad this B Kinder Day on June 22

Clever ads no cure for vaccine complacency

Mark Knight's covid vaccine cartoon
health

Mark Knight was wondering what it would take to encourage a reluctant public to front up for Covid-19 vaccinations when the answer presented itself in the form of another outbreak

PM resolute on keeping the drawbridge up

Mark Knight cartoon for Tuesday 18th of may 2021 Herald Sun Newspaper.
civics

When it comes to international travel, it doesn’t look like our Prime Minister is ready to open up Fortress Australia anytime soon, which gives Mark Knight lots of fun metaphors to draw

NRL hero backs local sports boost

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - SEPTEMBER 19: Luke Keary of the Roosters scores a try during the round 19 NRL match between the Sydney Roosters and the Cronulla Sharks at Sydney Cricket Ground on September 19, 2020 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images)
sport

Injured Roosters star Luke Keary loved his junior rugby league days and is excited more local sports are sharing the spotlight in a new campaign to boost community competitions

Other story puts Federal budget in shade

Mark Knight cartoon for Monday  10th of May  2021 Herald Su Newspaper .
civics

The Federal budget is the biggest day of the year in the nation’s capital, yet the size of the pile of money Josh Frydenberg has to manage is dwarfed by the wealth of two other people in the news

What it takes to be a YouTube star

Image of Aussie teen YouTube star ReeKid.  Supplied for Jonathan Moran.
just for fun

So, you want to be a famous YouTuber? Aussie teen ‘Reekid’ reveals how he did it, and the down side to his success

Earth safe from asteroid hit

An illustration of a large asteroid impacting Earth. An impact this large would result in the extinction of most all life on Earth. Earth texture maps courtesy of NASA - source http
space

An asteroid that had threatened to crash into Earth has been removed from NASA’s ‘risk list’ for at least the next 100 years

‘Lunar ark’ plan to store species’ DNA on the Moon

A team of University of Arizona researchers has mapped out a plan for a "Lunar Ark" to store the DNA of 6.7 million species on the moon in case a disaster destroys life on Earth. Image: Jekan Thanga
space

Scientists have mapped out a plan to store the DNA of 6.7 million species in a “lunar ark” on the Moon in case of a disaster on Earth

All aboard for faster-than-light travel

(L-r) Chewbacca character with actor Mark Hamill, Alec Guinness and Harrison Ford in the Millennium Falcon in scene from Special Edition "Star Wars" film trilogy. /Films/Titles/Star/Wars
space

Spaceships zipping at the speed of light or faster are currently something from science fiction. But a physicist’s new research moves the idea a step closer to being achieved in your lifetime

Authors reveal secret to co-writing book on opposite sides of the world

Book cover - The World Between Blinks by Amie Kaufman and Ryan Graudin. For Kids News
book club

Thanks to some great questions from Kids News readers we know how authors Amie Kaufman and Ryan Graudin wrote The World Between Blinks together on opposite sides of the globe. And that they’re working on a sequel!

Fears for spelling in the digital age

Australians overwhelming believe spelling is important but they fear standards are slipping because of social media and text messaging. iStock image. For Kids News
news

Most adults think kids are getting worse at spelling thanks to text messaging and social media. How’s your spelling?

Jane’s V the sign of a little victory for science

Mark Knight's V is for vaccine cartoon.
news

The first COVID-19 vaccination to be given in Australia was big news and though the photo opportunity didn’t quite go to plan, a V for Vaccine could be taken to mean a V for Victory after all

Kids give gender stereotypes the boot

The Coolangatta Tweed Heads Australian Football Club girls under 13Õs celebrate the clubs plans for a development worth just under $1 million at Exim Oval and has big plans for it's juniors and seniors.
Picture Scott Powick
humanities

Respectful relationships lessons have changed the games boys and girls want to play and the jobs they want to do when they grow up

New ads urge teens to rethink sugary drinks

Rethink Sugary Drink alliance is launching their ÒFull of CrapÓ counter-campaign on Monday. It hijacks sugary drink companiesÕ manipulative marketing and advertising tactics, with the aim of urging young people (males aged 14-24 are AustraliaÕs highest consumers of sugary drinks) to rethink their sugary drink consumption.1 in 6 teens downs 5.2kg of sugar each year from sugary drinks alone. (L-R) Kieran Johns (13), James Georgiou (13) and Nathan John (13) pouring 5.2kg of sugar into a bowl. Picture: Josie Hayden
health

Teenagers and young men are the targets of new ads designed to shock them about how easy it is to be sucked into ads for sugary drinks and get hooked on drinking them

Hard work ahead to clean up at Collingwood

Mark Knight's cartoon about Collingwood's report on racism.
sport

Racism is something we should all seek to bring to an end, whether it be in our daily lives, politics or in sport, writes Mark Knight in his column explaining the story behind this cartoon

Study finds ideal after-school screen hours

Ethan, 9, and Ryan Arnold, 13, at home, in Sans Souci, today. They play video games in the school holidays mainly and the parents say they have to finish their schoolwork before they spend time on the computer.
(Computer games story)
Picture:Justin Lloyd.
technology

A study has found the ideal number of hours students can spend online and playing video games before screen time slows development and affects NAPLAN test results

Listen to the sounds and music of space

This NASA composite image received 22 August 2006, shows the galaxy cluster 1E 0657-56, also known as the |bullet cluster.| A huge collision between two clusters of galaxies has provided the first direct evidence of the existence of the universe's mysterious dark matter, researchers said 22 August.|This is the most energetic cosmic event, besides the Big Bang, which we know about,| said Maxim Markevitch of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This cluster was formed after the collision of two large clusters of galaxies, the most energetic event known in the universe since the Big Bang. Hot gas detected by Chandra in X-rays is seen as two pink clumps in the image and contains most of the |normal,| or b
space

You can now hear the sounds of space, according to a NASA project that has assigned musical notes and instruments to the goings-on of two supernovas and a colliding cluster of galaxies

Australian surgeons rebuild girl’s spine

HOLD FOR SATURDAY/SUNDAY HERALD SUN PIC DESK------ The Children First Foundation has brought Nichole Jamelo over from the Phillipines to have her spine operated on at Epworth Hospital in Richmond.    Nichole back at the retreat after surgery. .  Picture: Alex Coppel.
health

Standing straight and walking tall for the first time in her life, 11-year-old Nichole Jamelo can’t wait to take on the world now that two 90-degree bends in her spine have been straightened out

Peace and goodwill enduring themes of Christmas

Mark Knight's Christmas cartoon. Picture: Mark Knight
arts

Mark Knight wonders how Santa’s operations might look in the 21st century with social media, job cuts, mass manufacturing and low-cost couriers. At least we can still aim for peace and goodwill

Education drives Kirrah’s dream

Indigenous student Kirrah Stothers, 17, is from Katherine in the Northern Territory and attends prestigious Seymour College in Adelaide on an Australian Indigenous Education Foundation scholarship. She is one of the stars of the Sky News documentary, Changing Our Nation. For Kids News
humanities

Meet Kirrah Stothers, one of the stars of an inspirational documentary about young indigenous students following their dreams to change the world

How to take your financial first steps

Getting their first job is a good time for teenagers to take their financial first steps. iStock image. For Kids News
money

Are you thinking of getting your first part-time job over the summer holidays? You’ll need to get your money matters sorted. Here’s how

Great Barrier Reef outlook now ‘critical’

TOPSHOT - This undated handout photo released on April 20, 2016 by XL Catlin Seaview Survey shows a turtle swimming over bleached coral at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef.  Australia's iconic Great Barrier Reef is suffering its worst coral bleaching ever recorded with 93 percent impacted, scientists said on April 20, 2016 as they revealed the phenomenon was also hitting the other side of the country. / AFP PHOTO / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY / STR / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - NO ARCHIVES
environment

Climate change is increasingly damaging UN World Heritage sites including the Great Barrier Reef, a new report warns, while 2020 is on track to be the second hottest year on record

Cricket star grows all out for charity

NSW cricketers Sean Abbott (L), Moises Henriques (centre) and Daniel Hughes (R) prepare for Movember in 2020. For Kids News. Supplied by Cricket Australia
health

They might look a bit funny, but there’s a serious message behind the moustaches sprouting from some of our star sportsmen, including cricketer Moises Henriques

Author Katrina Nannestad answers questions from Kids News readers

We Are Wolves by Katrina Nannestad - book cover. For Kids News
book club

Writing We Are Wolves left Katrina Nannestad in tears at times but also made her happy. We know this thanks to some great questions from Kids News readers. Check out Katrina’s answers to the top 10 questions here

Biden claims victory in US election

US President-elect Joe Biden stands with wife Jill Biden after delivering remarks in Wilmington, Delaware, on November 7, 2020, after being declared the winners of the presidential election. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP)
civics

Joe Biden has defeated President Donald Trump to become the 46th president of the United States, saying he wants to unify the country

Astronomers find source of fast radio burst

This image from video animation provided by NASA in November 2020 depicts a powerful X-ray burst erupting from a magnetar – a supermagnetized version of a stellar remnant known as a neutron star. A radio burst detected April 28, 2020, occurred during a flare-up like this on a magnetar called SGR 1935. The radio signal was more powerful than any previously seen in our galaxy. The simultaneous X-ray and radio events implicate magnetars as a likely source of mysterious fast radio bursts observed from other galaxies. (Chris Smith (USRA)/NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center via AP)
space

Scientists — with the help of antennae made from actual cake tins — have solved the mystery of what causes fast radio bursts of energy that zip and zigzag through the universe

US election: How does it work? What could happen?

(FILES) (COMBO) This combination of file pictures created on October 22, 2020 shows US President Donald Trump (L) and Democratic Presidential candidate and former US Vice President Joe Biden during the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on October 22, 2020. - Democrat Joe Biden leads in the national polls and most of the battleground states going into Election Day but President Donald Trump is insisting they're wrong and he'll repeat his upset victory of 2016. Biden, the 77-year-old former vice president, has enjoyed a solid lead over Trump, 74, in the national polls for months, at times reaching double digits. (Photos by Brendan Smialowski and JIM WATSON / AFP)
explainers

This year’s presidential election is one of the most watched in US election history – regardless of whether Donald Trump or Joe Biden is the winner. Here’s a guide to what will and could happen

Study reveals benefits of all-girls schools

School girls cooperating while repairing mother board in the classroom. Focus is on arm.
humanities

Girls at single-sex schools outperform their peers at co-ed campuses, new research shows. There is less bullying and less skipping class and fewer friendship fights at single-sex schools

‘Bionic spine’ brings hope to people with disabilities

Melbourne researchers developing a "bionic spine" - effectively allowing a person to control robotic limbs through their thoughts. Royal Melbourne Hospital lead researchers Dr Tom Oxley and Dr Nick Opie are in the early stages of development.       Photo David Caird
science

Melbourne scientists and surgeons have given patients with disabilities the power to work computers with their mind in a world-first “bionic spine” breakthrough

Teen boys more confident than girls, study shows

Teenage Hispanic female high school student is using plastic educational model toy molecules while studying in private school science class. Girl is holding study material while talking to teacher. Student is wearing a private school uniform.
humanities

Smart girls suffer a fear of failure even when they beat boys at school, a new global study of 600,000 reveals. The study also found that girls are better than boys at conflict resolution

Hope for diabetics in three-minute thesis

University of Adelaide PhD candidate Khalia Primer, 23 originally from Cleve on the Eyre Peninsula, in the laboratory at SAHMRI. She working on gene therapy to treat diabetic ulcers. 14 September 2020. Picture Dean Martin
science

Scientist Khalia Primer’s award-winning video cleverly explains years of complex gene therapy research that could help solve some of the serious health problems faced by people with diabetes

Venus clouds show signs of possible life

An artist's impression of the Venusian surface for National Geographic TV program ''Earth's Evil Twin'' about planet Venus. (Photo credit: European Space Agency)
space

We know humans couldn’t survive the heat and huge pressure on Venus, our closest neighbour. But some form of alien life could be producing an Earth-like gas astronomers have found in its clouds

Human-sized wormholes are possible

Silhouette of man looking at light, at end of tunnel, rear view
mathematics

Scientists have used quantum mechanics and maths to show that gateways connecting two points in space and time and big enough and stable enough for human travel are theoretically possible

How to protect yourself from scams

Online shopping. For Kids News story on protecting yourself against online scams.
money

More of us are buying and banking online, especially during the coronavirus pandemic, and scammers are taking advantage of this. But there are ways to protect yourself from becoming a victim of a scam

How to find your voice and talk to a crowd

Kailash Sarma, 17, is teaching young people how to master public speaking and improve their confidence and self-esteem. His Captivate the Future program is open to secondary students around the country. For Kids News and Hibernation
humanities

A teenage public-speaking whiz is on a mission to help kids reeling from coronavirus disruptions master the art of talking to a crowd, finding their voice and their confidence

Kids urged to get real on fake news

Red Computer Keyboard with balloons showing Fake News or Facts.
civics

You might have heard US President Donald Trump use these words, but what exactly is fake news and how do you spot it?

Lump on leg shows dinosaurs got cancer

Centrosaurus dinosaur, bones from which are being excavated live at the Australian Museum in Sydney.
science

It’s tempting to think of dinosaurs as supernatural or mythical beasts but we now know for sure they were affected by many of the same diseases as humans and other animals, including cancer

‘Karen’s’ mask fight not just about her rights

Knight cartoon for 27/7/20  the Karen plague
civics

Like a school essay, a cartoon is a way to compare and contrast two sides to an issue. In this case it’s about someone demanding their rights but forgetting their responsibilities to the vulnerable

Around an Aussie campfire of statues

Mark Knight's campfire cartoon for Kids news
civics

Mark Knight explains the issues behind the cartoon of two Aussies sitting by this particular campfire and wonders how Australia will react to this period of self-examination

36 alien races could live in Milky Way

1982. Scene from film "ET: the extraterrestrial".  alien
space

Astronomers now believe there are 36 advanced alien civilisations living in the Milky Way and able to send radio signals, assuming that intelligent life on other planets is similar to humans

Cartoons are not always meant to make you laugh

Mark Knight's cartoon of Donald Trump
civics

Sometimes cartoonists have to cover serious issues, such as war, famine, injustice and even death, about which it’s not appropriate or possible to make people laugh. This was one of those times

Why are there big protests around the world?

TOPSHOT - Protestors gather near the makeshift memorial in honour of George Floyd marking one week anniversary of his death, on June 1, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. - Major US cities -- convulsed by protests, clashes with police and looting since the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd a week ago -- braced Monday for another night of unrest. More than 40 cities have imposed curfews after consecutive nights of tension that included looting and the trashing of parked cars. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP)
civics

Protests — some peaceful and some violent — continue across the US and elsewhere around the world over police treatment of black people. Kids News explains why people are protesting

Young minds rise to the challenge

smart kid, thinker. iStock image. For Kids News Hibernation story on Westpac Youth Impact Challenge
humanities

They might be young but they’re thinking big. Find out how the Westpac Youth Impact Challenge is inspiring kid entrepreneurs who want to make the world a better place

Australian scientists break internet speed record

27/05/2020. Scientists Bill Corcoran , David Moss and Arnon Mitchell in the lab at RMIT where they worked on the experiment that broke the internet speed world record this week. 
Picture: David Geraghty / The Australian.
technology

Using 76.7km of ordinary fibre cables between two Victorian universities, Australian computer scientists have achieved incredible internet speeds of 44.2 million megabits a second

Insulin that mimics venom of deep-sea snail

HUMAN insulin modified to mimic the venom of a deep sea snail could help speed up diabetes treatments and improve outcomes. Mum Jade Erickson says fast acting insulin would help son Justin, 11 and husband Michael, 45, who both suffer from the disease. Parents Jade and Michael Erickson with kids Justin, 11 and sister Jaimi, 13. Picture: Jason Edwards
science

Scientists in Australia have described as possibly life changing the invention of human insulin that mimics cone snail venom insulin, working almost instantly to lower blood sugar levels

Billie’s kindness lives on

Billie Kinder, 12. B Kinder Day on  June 22 honours Billie by encouraging children to spread kindness, empathy and compassion. For Kids News Hibernation
humanities

Australian schoolgirl Billie Kinder always believed she could make the world a better place. Now her family hopes the third annual B Kinder Day on June 22 will take her message worldwide

Astronomers find closest black hole to Earth

This illustration provided by the European Southern Observatory in May 2020 shows the orbits of the objects in the HR 6819 triple system. The group is made up of an inner binary with one star, orbit in blue, and a newly discovered black hole, orbit in red, as well as a third star in a wider orbit, blue. The team originally believed there were only two objects, the two stars, in the system. However, as they analysed their observations, they revealed a third, previously undiscovered body in HR 6819: a black hole, the closest ever found to Earth, about 1000 light years away. The black hole is invisible, but it makes its presence known by its gravitational pull, which forces the luminous inner star into an orbit. The objects in this inner pair have roughly the same mass and circular orbits. (L. Calçada/ESO via AP)
space

Two stars dancing in the night sky and visible without a telescope have led astronomers to find a black hole so close to Earth it’s “just around the corner” in space terms

Painting clouds and other ideas to save our Reef

This undated handout photo received on April 6, 2020 from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, shows coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. - Australia's Great Barrier Reef has suffered its most widespread coral bleaching on record, scientists said on April 7, 2020 in a dire warning about the threat posed by climate change to the world's largest living organism. James Cook University professor Terry Hughes said a comprehensive survey last month found record sea temperatures had caused the third mass bleaching of the 2,300-kilometre (1,400-mile) reef system in just five years. (Photo by Handout / JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY AUSTRALIA / AFP) / TO BE USED EXCLUSIVELY FOR AFP STORY AUSTRALIA-ENVIRONMENT-CLIMATE-REEF RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - NO ARCHIVE /
environment

Action on climate change and ideas such as painting clouds with water and growing heat-tolerant coral are being considered to help the Great Barrier Reef be healthier in 30 years’ time

Aussie treasures stored in global code bank

The film reels are sorted by country. Picture: supplied
technology

The scientific knowledge about Australia’s plants and animals and the contents of our national library are among the digital treasures being kept 250m underground in Norway

Generation Equality for International Women’s Day

SUNDAY TELEGRAPH - Pictured is Georgia Whittemore and Gemma Murchie-Young at the International Women's Day, March to Mourn All Women Murdered rally in Hyde Park Sydney today. Picture: Tim Hunter.
humanities

Half a billion women around the world can’t read and write — that’s just one of the important topics people are talking about this week to mark International Women’s Day

Violinist plays during her own brain surgery

CORRECTION - A still image take from handout video footage released by King’s College Hospital in London on February 19, 2020 and recorded on January 31, 2020, shows musician Dagmar Turner playing the violin during brain surgery at King's College Hospital in London. - A violinist helped surgeons avoid damage to her brain during surgery to remove a tumour by playing her instrument, the UK hospital where she underwent the innovative procedure said. Surgeons came up with the novel approach to ensure areas of Dagmar Turner's brain responsible for delicate hand movement were not affected during the precision procedure. Turner, a 53-year-old musician with the Isle of Wight Symphony Orchestra in southern England, was diagnosed in 2013 with a slow growing tumour after suffering a seizure during a concert. (Photo by - / KING'S COLLEGE HOSPITAL / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / KING'S COLLEGE HOSPITAL" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS / “The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by - has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [Dagmar instead of [Dogmar]. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require.”
health

A musician has played her violin during a six-hour, lifesaving operation to remove a brain tumour, helping calm the woman’s fears the surgery would ruin her ability to play

Boy’s traditional hairstyle banned by school

Wendy Taniela with her 5 year old son Cyrus Taniela in a play ground in Upper Caboolture.

The mother of a five-year-old boy with long hair says his Caboolture school, Australian Christian College Moreton, told them it had to be cut despite his hair cutting ceremony, which is part of his father’s Cook Islands and Niuean heritage, being still a year away

Monday February 10,2020. (AAP image, John Gass)
humanities

A Queensland boy could be being discriminated against on the basis of race because he has been told to cut his long hair for school, even though he wears it tied in a bun

Impeachment: Trump not guilty on both charges

TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump arrives for a "Keep America Great" campaign rally in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, January 14, 2020. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP)
civics

US President Donald Trump has been acquitted of the charges of abusing his power and obstructing Congress, paving the way for his campaign for re-election

Can you crack the 30-year-old code?

CIA headquarter Langley US Kryptos
mathematics

The final clue to a coded message on a sculpture outside the US spy agency’s HQ unveiled 30 years ago has been revealed by the code’s creator

Tribute for Holocaust 75th anniversary

OSWIECIM, POLAND - JANUARY 27:  A guard tower stands illuminated at the former Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp near the Auschwitz Memorial during the official ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camp on January 27, 2020 near Oswiecim, Poland. International leaders as well as approximately 200 survivors and their families are gathering today at Auschwitz today to attend the commemoration. The Nazis killed an estimated one million people at the camp during the World War II occupation of Poland by Nazi Germany. The Soviet Army liberated the camp on January 27, 1945.   (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
humanities

The Duchess of Cambridge has taken photographs of Holocaust survivors in a moving tribute to mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of World War II concentration camp Auschwitz

Energy drinks robbing teens of sleep

Aussie teens are being deprived of sleep in a major new survey that found teens who consumed energy drinks at least once a week were twice as likely to get less than eight hours sleep on a school night than those who didn't. Jett Jones-Czechowski (C) with mates Luan O'Connor (L) and Taj Burns (R) pictured at Bondi Skate Park. Picture: Toby Zerna
health

Energy drinks loaded with caffeine are depriving Aussie teens of sleep, a major new survey shows. Experts want advertising of the drinks banned on public transport

National gun amnesty to keep us safe

An assortment of hand guns and rifles handed in during the Federal Government Gun Amnesty in 2017 on display as  the New South Wales Government announce a state gun amnesty in Sydney, Wednesday, May 16, 2018. Following the success of the Federal Government gun amnesty in 2017 the NSW Government will conduct a state wide gun amnesty beginning from July 1, 2018 (AAP Image/Dean Lewins) NO ARCHIVING
civics

Australian firearm owners will be able to hand in guns with no questions asked next year as part of a national gun amnesty designed to keep us safe and weapons away from criminals

Veterans go ‘back to Hell’ through VR films

An incident on the Sandakan Death March. From a painting at Borneo's Kundasang War Memorial, courtesy of Lynette Silver.
history

As we mark Remembrance Day today, stunning new virtual reality films are allowing all Australians to learn about some of the forgotten and darkest chapters of our World War II history

World’s scientists unite on climate

Climate protesters gather across the street from the New York County Courthouse, where the Exxon Mobil trial is taking place, November 1, 2019 in New York. (Photo by Don Emmert / AFP)
environment

More than 11,000 scientists have signed a declaration warning of a climate emergency and offered six clear measures they believe could avoid “untold human suffering”

Tiny computer makes quantum leap

This undated handout image obtained October 23, 2019 courtesy of Google shows Sundar Pichai with one of Google's quantum computers in the Santa Barbara lab. - Scientists claimed on October 23, 2019 to have achieved a near-mythical state of computing in which a new generation of machine vastly outperforms the world's fastest super-computer, known as "quantum supremacy". A team of experts working on Google's Sycamore machine said their quantum system had executed a calculation in 200 seconds that would have taken a classic computer 10,000 years to complete.In a study published in Nature, the international team designed the Sycamore quantum processer, made up of 54 qubits interconnected in a lattice pattern. They used the machine to perform a task related to random-number generation, identifying patterns amid seemingly random spools of figures.The Sycamore, just a few millimetres across, solved the task within 200 seconds, a process that on a regular machine would take 10,000 years -- several hundreds of millions of times faster, in other words. Google's CEO Sundar Pichai hailed the result as a sea change in computing. (Photo by HO / GOOGLE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / GOOGLE/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
technology

Google has achieved a breakthrough in quantum computing, developing a processor that took minutes to do what would take the world’s best supercomputer thousands of years

Media unites in fight against secrecy

The frontage of the Australian newspaper 'The Australian' shows a 'Your right to know' ads as part of a campaign calling on the Australian Parliament to enshrine press freedom and protect whistleblowers at Parliament House in Canberra, Monday, October 21, 2019. (AAP Image/Lukas Coch) NO ARCHIVING
civics

Australia’s major media organisations have taken the unprecedented step of uniting to fight for press freedoms and the public’s right to know what’s going on in this country

Out-there plan for 13-minute journey to Mars

Mars, The Red Planet, imaged using the Hubble Space Telescope. Picture: NASA
space

A NASA scientist has designed a rocket that could reach close to the speed of light without using any fuel, going to the Moon in just over a second and putting distant stars within reach

Scientist becomes world’s first full cyborg

Dr Scott-Morgan’s avatar. Picture: Youtube, Embody DigitalSource:Supplied
technology

A world-renowned roboticist with motor neurone disease is transforming himself into a robot to extend his life, with plenty more upgrades and updates planned for the future

Kid-watching home spy invention on way

Picture: iStock
woman eats sweets at night to sneak in a refrigerator
technology

Google has legal permission to develop technology that monitors where children are at home and what they are doing, eating and saying, raising concerns about privacy and children’s rights

Michael celebrates birthday with the gift of life

Michael Theobald, with his Mother Sashi. He is about to turn 1 after having a liver transplant at the Royal Chhildren's Hospital earlier this year.
Picture: Jay Town
explainers

As Australians are asked to talk about organ donation during Donate Life week, we meet tiny Michael Theobald who celebrated his first birthday with the gift of life after a liver transplant

Adani coal mine given the green light

Coal production at one of the open fields in the south of Siberia. Dumpers "BelAZ". September 2015.
environment

After nine years, nine legal reviews and $3.7 billion to get it started, the controversial Adani megamine in Queensland has been given the green light to start construction

Ancient coins that could rewrite Australian history

Darwin historian Mike Owen holds up a coin he believes is from Kilwa at his home in Rapid Creek, wednesday, May 15, 2019. Mike Hermes revealed he found an ancient coin lying on a beach on the Wessel Islands last year he believes to be from Kilwa, more than 10,000km away in what is now known as Tanzania, dating from before the 15th century.


Picture: Keri Megelus
money

Tiny copper coins up to 1000 years old found on a remote beach on an Australian island could add a new chapter to the story of our European history

Ancient jawbone solves mountain puzzle

A handout photo made available by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology on May 1, 2019 shows a view of the virtual reconstruction of the Xiahe mandible after digital removal of the adhering carbonate crust, which was found in 1980 in Baishiya Karst Cave. - The mandible is so well preserved that it allows for a virtual reconstruction of the two sides of the mandible. The Denisovan mandible likely represents the earliest hominin fossil on the Tibetan Plateau. (Photo by Jean-Jacques HUBLIN / the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology / Jean-Jacques HUBLIN" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
science

A jawbone found in Tibet of an ancient cousin of humans from at least 160,000 years ago proves humans adapted to live at high altitude far earlier than we thought

Scurvy making a comeback due to poor diets

Doctors are battling a surprising resurgence of scurvy in Sydney patients it's being blamed on a lack of Vitamin C. Aria Thorn, 4, (left) with sister Shylah Thorn, 5, from Waverley enjoying an orange and watermelon after a ride in Centennial Park. Picture: Jonathan Ng
health

A serious but easily preventable disease we associate with sailors on long voyages hundreds of years ago is making people sick in modern-day Australia

Diary of a Gallipoli ANZAC

Philip Owen Ayton in 1915. Picture: supplied
history

Philip Owen Ayton enlisted soon after World War I was declared. He took part in the Gallipoli landing, describing it in vivid detail in a diary now published for the first time

Mind-control brain implant trials to begin

Generic image of human brain at work. Picture: Thinkstock
health

An Australian hospital has approved a world-first human trial of a brain implant to help people with advanced diseases of the nervous system communicate via mind control

World’s richest prize for teacher of the poor

This handout picture provided on March 24, 2019 by the Global Education and Skills Forum, an initiative of the Varkey Foundation, shows Kenyan teacher Peter Tabichi (C) holding up the Global Teacher Prize (GTP) trophy after winning the US$ 1 million award during an official ceremony in Dubai presented by Australian actor Hugh Jackman (C-L) and attended by the Dubai Crown Prince Hamdan bin Mohammed Al-Maktoum (C-R). - Tabichi, a 36-year-old maths and physics teacher at Keriko Secondary School in the village of Pwani, in Kenya's Nakuru county, was named as winner of the "largest prize of its kind", set up by the Varkey Foundation to "recognize one exceptional teacher who has made an outstanding contribution to the profession." (Photo by - / Global Education and Skills Forum / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / GLOBAL EDUCATION AND SKILLS FORUM" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
humanities

There is only one computer, bad internet access, no library, no science laboratory and drought and famine are frequent, yet Peter Tabichi’s students are achieving great things

Questions I am asked about the Holocaust

BY8B50 AUSCHWITZ CONCENTRATION CAMP children photographed by Russians who liberated the camp in January 1945
history

Hedi Fried was 19 when she was captured by the Nazis and sent to a concentration camp during WWII. She survived and now, at 94, still uses her story to teach students about the Holocaust

Ancient tattoo kit made from human bone

Geoffrey Clark with one of the pieces of bone that is an ancient tattoo tool. Picture: ANU
history

Researchers have uncovered the world’s oldest known tattoo kit, some of which is made from human bone and believed to be 2700 years old

Plan to pay male and female athletes equally

17/02/19 - Story about push for equal pay in women's sport.  Basketballer Hannah Black, Golfer Ashleigh Evans, Basketballer Annabell McNico, Footballer Millie Shepherd Boyd and Basketballer Jade Yelegin. 
Picture: Tom Huntley
sport

Australia’s major sports organisations have supported a bold new plan to close the gender pay gap in sport so that female and male athletes are paid equally

Murray cod to be trucked to safety

Fisheries researcher Jarod Lyon electrofishing and monitoring Murray Cod and other fish species on the Murray River, downstream from Yarrawonga. 
Releasing a large Murray Cod.
Photo by Chloe Smith
environment

After pictures of millions of dead fish shocked the world, the NSW government has begun a bold plan to catch trapped Darling River fish and truck them downstream

Hope shines 10 years after Black Saturday

The 10th anniversary of the 2009 Victorian bushfires now known as Black Saturday in which 173 people died. The anniversary was held at the Royal Exhibition Building in Melbourne . Picture : Ian Currie
humanities

Communities affected by the Black Saturday bushfires gather this week to mark the 10-year anniversary and reflect on how far they have come

Predicting drought and bushfires from space

Twin GRACE-FO satellites will follow each other in orbit around the Earth, separated by about 220 km. Picture: NASA
environment

Australian researchers have moved their focus to space to learn more about how to foresee and manage future droughts and bushfires on Earth

Meet our mysterious lost ancestors

MARCH, 2003 : Scene from BBC documentary TV series "Walking with Cavemen", 03/03.
Prehistoric Man
history

Australian researchers are helping solve the mystery of an ancient tribe that once walked the Earth alongside Neanderthals and early humans

Earth’s magnetic pole is in a hurry

Car apps, motor guide.
geography

The magnetic field of our planet is essential to our survival. But it’s not behaving like scientists expected and nobody knows why

‘Canberra bubble’ the 2018 word of the year

OnlineOpinion Art 9 Feb 2018. Politicians inside the Canberra bubble.
John Tiedemann
humanities

A two-word phrase — made famous by the Prime Minister — about politicians worrying about themselves rather than everyday Australians has been named the 2018 Word of the Year

Forests of underground zombie-like organisms

This undated handout photo courtesy of Gaetan Borgonie(Extreme Life Isyensya, Belgium, Deep Carbon Observatory, obtained December 10, 2018 shows a nematode (eukaryote) in a biofilm of microorganisms, an unidentified nematode (Poikilolaimus sp.) from Kopanang gold mine in South Africa,which lives 1.4 km below the surface. - About 70 percent of the Earth's microbes live in its depths, in rocks once considered barren but where bacteria and other unicellular organisms abound. For the first time, researchers have estimated the extent of this deep life or "intraterrestrial". Hundreds of international researchers who are members of the Deep Carbon Observatory - an in-depth carbon observatory - released on December 10, 2018 for the American Geophysics Summit in Washington, the sum of their work estimating that deep life represented a mass of 15 to 23 billion tons of carbon, 245 to 385 more than the seven billion people. (Photo by Gaetan BORGONIE / Gaetan BORGONIE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Gaetan Borgonie(Extreme Life Isyensya, Belgium/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS / TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY IVAN COURRONE AND KERRY SHERIDAN -"Life in Deep Earth Totals 15 to 23 Billion Tonnes of Carbon—Hundreds of Times More than Humans"
science

A 10-year team effort by hundreds of scientists has found massive underground forests of life, which could help us manage climate change and hold clues to life on other planets

Voyager 2, Australia is listening to you

This NASA artist's concept shows the general locations of NASA's two Voyager spacecraft, Voyager 1 (top) has sailed beyond our solar bubble into interstellar space, the space between stars, and Voyager 2 (bottom) is still exploring the outer layer of the solar bubble. - NASA's Voyager 2 probe has left the protective bubble around the Sun and is flying through interstellar space, becoming the second human-made object to travel so far, the US space agency said December 10, 2018. The announcement came six years after its twin spacecraft, Voyager 1, broke the outer boundary of the heliopause, where the hot solar wind meets the cold, dense space between stars, known as the interstellar medium. (Photo by HO / NASA/JPL-CALTECH / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-CALTECH" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

After 41 years in space, Voyager 2 has finally left the Sun’s heliosphere. As it moved into interstellar space, Earth received its farewell messages via Australia’s very special radio telescope and antenna

Collision creates supermassive black hole

A supplied undated artist's impression obtained Monday, December 3, 2018 of the biggest known black-hole collision. An international team, including Australian scientists, have discovered wrinkles in space and time, known as gravitational waves, from the biggest known collision of binary black holes that has formed a new black-hole about 80 times larger than the sun. (AAP Image/Supplied by the Australian National University, SXS) NO ARCHIVING
space

Scientists have detected the biggest known collision between black holes, creating a new, supermassive black hole. We look at what a black hole is, how they are made and if Earth is in danger

Sir David Attenborough’s climate change warning

Picture shows: Sir David Attenborough in Blue Planet II for Hit.TV
environment

The world’s most famous environmentalist has used his position on the “people’s chair” at the UN climate meeting to warn of disaster on a global scale unless leaders act to slow climate change

How we tell the time just got more accurate

This photo released August 22, 2013, courtesy of the National Institute of Standards and Technology shows NIST's ultra-stable ytterbium lattice atomic clock. Ytterbium atoms are generated in an oven (large metal cylinder on the left) and sent to a vacuum chamber in the center of the photo to be manipulated and probed by lasers. Laser light is transported to the clock by five fibers (such as the yellow fiber in the lower center of the photo). A pair of experimental atomic clocks based on ytterbium atoms at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has set a new record for stability. The clocks act like 21st-century pendulums or metronomes that could swing back and forth with perfect timing for a period comparable to the age of the universe.  NIST physicists report in the August 22, 2013 issue of Science Express that the ytterbium clocks' tick is more stable than any other atomic clock. Stability can be thought of as how precisely the duration of each tick matches every other tick. AFP PHOTO / NIST == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / NIST / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS ==
mathematics

Since the 1960s, the Earth’s time has run on 400 official clocks that we all use every day without even realising it. But a new kind of almost-perfect clock could change everything

Eight mummies found in Egyptian pyramid

This undated photo released by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities on Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018, shows an ancient mummy covered with a layer of painted cartonnage, which was found inside a sarcophagus in area of King Amenemhat II's pyramid in the Dahshur royal necropolis, about 25 miles south of Cairo. Egypt says archaeologists have discovered eight limestone sarcophagi with mummies inside. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities via AP)
history

Archaeologists have unearthed eight mummies in painted coffins in a former king’s pyramid in Egypt

Teens given stern tan danger warning

Phoebe Buckley and Sophie Rayne students at Lauriston Girls School  show importance of slip-slop-slap rather than pursuing a tan. Picture:Rob Leeson.
health

Skin cancer doctors are alarmed that many teenagers incorrectly believe that getting a tan is healthy. As summer approaches, it’s time to remember why we should all slip, slop, slap

Aussie lingo a living, thriving language

In a ripper move, Mattel is reaching out to true blue Aussies for Australian slang to be used in its new game Ð Aussie Scrabble. Clarissa Blaufelder, 24, and Dominic Titus, 25. Picture: Mark Stewart
humanities

Australian English is thriving and not in danger of becoming more American. The authors of Australia’s own dictionary have lists of new Australian words and sayings to prove it

Definition of a kilogram about to change

In this photo taken Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018., a replica of the International Prototype Kilogram is pictured at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, in Sevres, near Paris. The golf ball-sized metal cylinder at the heart of the world's system for measuring mass is heading into retirement. Gathering this week in Versailles, west of Paris, governments on Friday Nov. 16, 2018, are expected to approve a plan to instead use a scientific formula to define the exact weight of a kilo. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
mathematics

Since 1889 we have weighed everything against a little cylinder of metal locked in a vault in France. Now, the world is about to agree to completely change the way it defines a kilogram

Kakadu’s traditional owners granted Jabiru native title

Mirarr traditional owners Yvonne Margarula and Nida Mangarnbarr hold up the judgment documents with a next generation traditional owner Simon Mudjandi following Friday's Jabiru Township Native Title determination in Jabiru, NT.
Picture: Justin Kennedy
civics

The Mirrar people have been granted native title rights over the Kakadu mining town of Jabiru after a 20-year fight. We look at the history of the Native Title Act in Australia

Human brain and memory enhancement possible soon

Human Internal Organic - Human Brain, 3D illustration medical concept.
technology

Researchers are already working on changing, improving and rewriting humans’ memories, which means they also have to find ways to keep our brains safe from hackers