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Mathematics

Owning a pet has many health benefits for kids. iStock image. For Kids News Hibernation

Dogs then cats top list of favourite pets

humanities

Australians love pets and our favourite pets are definitely dogs, according to the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey, which, for the first time, asked us about animals

ESCAPE:  ALICE SPRINGS, 2 MARCH 2018 – Qantas’ newest Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, which features a unique Indigenous livery, touched down in Alice Springs today. Picture: Qantas 
Yam Deaming by Emily Kame Kngwarreye

All aboard Emily, the big jet to nowhere

geography

The Great Southern Land scenic flight is thought to be the fastest-selling flight in Qantas history, giving passengers a birds-eye view of Australia then delivering them back to where the flight began

3 year old Mississippi alligator.  She can live to over 100 years and grow to 4 metres.

Alligator-squeak research wins big science prize

science

Scientists have won an international prize for research intended to make you laugh — and then think — for testing whether an alligator that breathes in helium squeaks like Minnie Mouse

Latest

T-rex maybe not so mighty after all

The new estimate is far smaller than the size of the T-Rex portrayed in the Jurassic Park films Credit: �2018 UNIVERSAL CITY STUDIOS PRODUCTIONS LLLP AND AMBLIN ENTERTAINMENT, INC
animals

An international team of scientists — led by a palaeontologist at the University of New England in New South Wales — have re-examined 100 years of dinosaur research to look afresh at T-rex

Human-sized wormholes are possible

Silhouette of man looking at light, at end of tunnel, rear view
mathematics

Scientists have used quantum mechanics and maths to show that gateways connecting two points in space and time and big enough and stable enough for human travel are theoretically possible

Aussie giraffe takes world height record

Australia Zoo giraffe, Forest, has officially made it into the Guinness World Records for being the tallest living giraffe. Photo: Australia Zoo
animals

After a tricky time measuring him, a 12-year-old giraffe called Forest – who lives at Australia Zoo in Queensland – has been confirmed as the world’s tallest giraffe, standing at 5.7m

Old video game sells for $164,000

Super Mario
just for fun

A 35-year-old Super Mario Bros. video game has been sold for more than $164,000, but the very high price still doesn’t beat the recent sale of an expensive Star Wars Boba Fett action figure

36 alien races could live in Milky Way

1982. Scene from film "ET: the extraterrestrial".  alien
space

Astronomers now believe there are 36 advanced alien civilisations living in the Milky Way and able to send radio signals, assuming that intelligent life on other planets is similar to humans

Big asteroids zooming ‘close’ by Earth

asteroid 2000 QW7, a diameter twice the height of the Eureka Tower will make a 'near pass' by Earth tomorrow (Saturday).
space

Four asteroids have zoomed past Earth this week at 80,000kmh, one thought to be about 44m wide. NASA had put them all on its ‘close approach’ list, but there’s no risk they’ll crash into us

Climbers to remeasure height of Everest

In this May 16, 2020 aerial photo released by Xinhua News Agency, Chinese surveyors hike toward a higher spot from the base camp on Mount Qomolangma at an altitude of 5,200 meters. The Chinese government-backed team plans to summit Mount Everest this week at a time when the world's tallest peak has been closed to commercial climbers. (Jigme Dorje/Xinhua via AP)
geography

A team of climbers is on its way to summit Mount Everest this week to measure whether it has grown as Earth’s tectonic plates move and try to end international disagreement on the subject

Human urine could help make concrete on Moon

The full moon sets behind trees in the Taunus region near Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, May 7, 2020. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
space

Scientists have found that urea, the main chemical ingredient in urine, would make a good lunar concrete for building a Moon base, reducing the need to launch supplies from Earth

Home learning enough to make parents scream

Mark Knight cartoon on parents coping with home schooling.
arts

In his weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight explores how parents are coping — or not — with the need to support their children’s education from home

What and where is the equator?

Picture supplied by Joel Selwood.   Joel Selwood and his dad at the Equator
explainers

Parachutists have set a world record for crossing the equator 12 times in a single jump, which got us wondering what the equator is, where it is and why do they launch space rockets there?

Hi-tech masked owl fights money fakers

The new $100 note for Australia
money

Australia’s new $100 note has been unveiled, featuring a little owl that makes it almost impossible to counterfeit. It’s the final denomination of the Next Generation Banknote Program

What is a leap year? Why is there one this year?

Girl watching the stars. Stars are digital illustration. istock image
explainers

There is a February 29 on this year’s calendar. We explain why and what it has to do with the Sun, the Earth and a calendar created way back in 1582

Celebrating once-in-a-lifetime palindrome day

3/2/2020 -  Baby Alex Duncan was born at the WCH on 02/02/2020, a date that is not only a palindrome, meaning it reads the same backwards and forwards, but it is also the only time such a sequence will occur this century. Mum Kasia with baby Alex. - Kasia, her husband Chris and daughter Jessica with Alex. Picture: Naomi Jellicoe
mathematics

When the calendar clicked over to 02/02/2020 on Sunday, few people realised it was a universal palindrome, a momentous date that hasn’t happened since 11/11/1111

Five and 10 cent coins to ‘die naturally’

News 16.5.11 BCM The five cent coin will be phased out. Pic: Sarah Marshall
money

The head of the Royal Australian Mint has signalled the eventual end of the 5c and 10c coins. We look at the value of cash and when it could be the right time to let these coins go

Can you crack the 30-year-old code?

CIA headquarter Langley US Kryptos
mathematics

The final clue to a coded message on a sculpture outside the US spy agency’s HQ unveiled 30 years ago has been revealed by the code’s creator

What we searched for on Google 2010-2020

TOPSHOT - A firefighter conducts back-burning measures to secure residential areas from encroaching bushfires in the Central Coast, some 90-110 kilometres north of Sydney on December 10, 2019. - Toxic haze blanketed Sydney on December 10 triggering a chorus of smoke alarms to ring across the city, as Australians braced for "severe" weather conditions expected to fuel deadly bush blazes. (Photo by Saeed KHAN / AFP)
history

This year’s bushfires prompted a bigger spike in Australian Google search queries than any other news event this decade, with floods and Cyclone Yasi also making the top-topics list

NASA’s totally unexpected Sun surprise

TOPSHOT - This handout illustration obtained July 6, 2018 courtesy of NASA/Johns Hopkins APL shows an artist’s conception of NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, the spacecraft that will fly through the Sun’s corona to trace how energy and heat move through the star’s atmosphere.   The Parker Solar Probe will launch on a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida no earlier than August 4, 2018. The mission will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun's atmosphere, called the corona. / AFP PHOTO / NASA/Johns Hopkins APL / HO / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT:  "AFP PHOTO / NASA / Johns Hopkins APL" / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

NASA’s Parker spacecraft has reported back that the Sun is sending out sudden, violent bursts of solar wind so powerful that the magnetic field flips itself in the opposite direction

World map of most common last names

The world map of names
geography

A fascinating new map has plotted out the most common surnames in every country in the world. Can you guess the most common last name in Australia?

Matildas and Socceroos to get equal pay

The Matildas have been rewarded for their success. Picture: Craig Mercer/MB Media/Getty Images
sport

In what’s believed to be a world-first deal, Australia’s two national soccer teams will be paid equally and all income from both teams will be split 50/50

Tiny computer makes quantum leap

This undated handout image obtained October 23, 2019 courtesy of Google shows Sundar Pichai with one of Google's quantum computers in the Santa Barbara lab. - Scientists claimed on October 23, 2019 to have achieved a near-mythical state of computing in which a new generation of machine vastly outperforms the world's fastest super-computer, known as "quantum supremacy". A team of experts working on Google's Sycamore machine said their quantum system had executed a calculation in 200 seconds that would have taken a classic computer 10,000 years to complete.In a study published in Nature, the international team designed the Sycamore quantum processer, made up of 54 qubits interconnected in a lattice pattern. They used the machine to perform a task related to random-number generation, identifying patterns amid seemingly random spools of figures.The Sycamore, just a few millimetres across, solved the task within 200 seconds, a process that on a regular machine would take 10,000 years -- several hundreds of millions of times faster, in other words. Google's CEO Sundar Pichai hailed the result as a sea change in computing. (Photo by HO / GOOGLE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / GOOGLE/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
technology

Google has achieved a breakthrough in quantum computing, developing a processor that took minutes to do what would take the world’s best supercomputer thousands of years

Little mistakes could make you big money

A glass jar full of Australian coins. Potential concept for savings, holiday fund, donations, charity, generosity. Money generic, Copy space.
money

Check your change and empty your money box! You may be the owner of coins that contain minting mistakes or imperfections that makes them worth thousands of dollars

Quick steps for world’s fastest ant

Saharan silver ants are very fast
animals

Scientists have found the fastest ant in the world — the Saharan silver — which takes 47 steps a second to cover about 90cm, the equivalent of a human running 579kmh

First-ever diamond inside a diamond

The diamond with another diamond inside. Picture: Siberian Times
science

Miners have unearthed an ultra-rare diamond with a second diamond loose inside it, believed to be the first example of such a diamond ever found

Secret code hidden in new 50 cent coin

The Royal Australian Mint's top secret coin
money

The Royal Australian Mint has made history after releasing the first Australian coin featuring a secret code. The new 50 cent coin has been launched to mark the 70th anniversary of ASIO

Girl wins big as 1 billionth plane passenger

Sydney Airport's one billionth passenger Katinka Hermens, 10 (centre) cuts a commemorative cake with Sydney Airport CEO Geoff Culbert (right) as Singapore Airlines' Regional Vice President of South West Pacific Philip Goh (left) looks on during a welcome ceremony at Sydney International Airport in Sydney, Thursday, September 5, 2019. (AAP Image/Paul Braven) NO ARCHIVING
history

A 10-year-old Australian girl has been met from her flight by crowds and an orchestra after becoming the one billionth passenger at Sydney Airport, which turns 100 this year.

Human-sized extinct penguin found

This illustration provided by the Canterbury Museum, shows the approximate height of a giant penguin, a "crossvallia waiparensis" next to a human being. Scientists in New Zealand say they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of a human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. (Canterbury Museum via AP)
animals

A citizen scientist has found fossilised bones from an extinct penguin that was the size of an adult human and swam in the ocean around New Zealand about 60 million years ago

Space telescope spies massive storm on Jupiter

This stunning image was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope
space

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has taken an amazing new photo of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, a massive storm wider than the Earth, with furious winds reaching speeds of up to 684kmh

Australia’s world-record big gold coin on show in US

A gold coin, produced by Perth Mint and supposedly worth $45 million USD stands on display at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on July 16, 2019 located at Wall Street in New York City. (Photo by Johannes EISELE / AFP)
money

The largest coin ever created, with a denomination of $1 million and worth about $60 million, travelled from its home in Australia to take centre stage for one day at the New York Stock Exchange

World’s best Rubik’s cubers ready to set records

Jack solving a Rubik's cube blindfold
mathematics

Australia’s champion speedcubers are warming up their fingers and concentrating their minds to take on the rest of the world for the World Rubik’s Cube Championships, July 11-14

Huge freshwater aquifer discovered below ocean

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JUNE 17: The Statue of Liberty is seen as The United States SailGP team boat "Lady Liberty" sails on the Hudson River on June 17, 2019 in New York City.   Mike Lawrie/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
environment

Scientists have discovered a lake under the ocean holding enough freshwater to fill 1 billion swimming pools, believed to be the biggest known undersea freshwater aquifer on Earth

Lost wallet study finds people care about others

A lost leather wallet found on the street. Picture: iStock.
humanities

Researchers “lost” 17,000 wallets across 355 cities in 40 countries in a social experiment that showed people are more likely to return it if it contains money

All you need to know about hair

Two chimpanzees have fun, laughing generic
explainers

The longest arm hair ever recorded was 21.7cm, but that’s not the norm. Though human head hair keeps growing, human body hair doesn’t. We look at how and why there’s a difference

Antarctica’s emperor penguins go missing

Emperor Penguins in Antarctica
animals

Scientists thought Antarctica’s Halley Bay would be a refuge from global warming for emperor penguins, but many breeding pairs are already missing

Australia’s rebel time zone

Ford LPG Challenge - Around Australia for Around $1000 (Adelaide to Perth leg. Day 3 Cocklebiddy to Kalgoolie. Wester Time Zone road sign along the Nullabor Plain 05 Aug 2006. road sign
mathematics

Look at the clocks in the roadhouses along a remote, 340km section of the highway through the Nullarbor and you’ll see they don’t match anyone’s smartphone time

World’s biggest T-rex unearthed

Chris Pratt faces a rampaging T-Rex dinosaur in a scene from film Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
animals

A massive, fierce dinosaur nicknamed Scotty has been dug from sandstone. Its leg bones are so big it is thought to have weighed 8800kg when it roamed the Earth

Daylight saving on way out

Daylight Saving, turning the clock back an hour. Picture: Tony Gough
mathematics

As Australians in four states grope around in the darkness of the last daylight saving mornings of the season, Europe has voted to cancel this clock-changing practice

Bees know how to do basic maths

Bee and Honeycomb Bee and Honeycomb Bee and Honeycomb Bee and Honeycomb
mathematics

An Australian study has found that despite having tiny brains, bees can learn to add and subtract 

How we tell the time just got more accurate

This photo released August 22, 2013, courtesy of the National Institute of Standards and Technology shows NIST's ultra-stable ytterbium lattice atomic clock. Ytterbium atoms are generated in an oven (large metal cylinder on the left) and sent to a vacuum chamber in the center of the photo to be manipulated and probed by lasers. Laser light is transported to the clock by five fibers (such as the yellow fiber in the lower center of the photo). A pair of experimental atomic clocks based on ytterbium atoms at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has set a new record for stability. The clocks act like 21st-century pendulums or metronomes that could swing back and forth with perfect timing for a period comparable to the age of the universe. NIST physicists report in the August 22, 2013 issue of Science Express that the ytterbium clocks' tick is more stable than any other atomic clock. Stability can be thought of as how precisely the duration of each tick matches every other tick. AFP PHOTO / NIST == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / NIST / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS ==
mathematics

Since the 1960s, the Earth’s time has run on 400 official clocks that we all use every day without even realising it. But a new kind of almost-perfect clock could change everything

Definition of a kilogram about to change

In this photo taken Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018., a replica of the International Prototype Kilogram is pictured at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, in Sevres, near Paris. The golf ball-sized metal cylinder at the heart of the world's system for measuring mass is heading into retirement. Gathering this week in Versailles, west of Paris, governments on Friday Nov. 16, 2018, are expected to approve a plan to instead use a scientific formula to define the exact weight of a kilo. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
mathematics

Since 1889 we have weighed everything against a little cylinder of metal locked in a vault in France. Now, the world is about to agree to completely change the way it defines a kilogram

Good at maths equals good with money

Pink piggy bank with glasses standing on books next to a blackboard with simple retirement formula. Sharp focus on the piggy bank.
money

Maths and money go hand in hand. Westpac research shows almost all adults believe learning maths is important in helping Aussies be smarter with their money

Hypersonic jet to fly New York-London in two hours

Boeing unveils new hypersonic jet
science

Hypersonic jets that travel five times faster than the speed of sound could be taking passengers by 2030

People power builds Australia’s electric highway

An electrical car charging station has been installed at the Point Cook Town Centre. It's free for people to use. Electronic Vehicle owner and Point Cook Town Centre shopper Chris Huntly with his Nissan electric car. Picture: Adam Elwood
environment

Tired of waiting for the government, electric-car owners of Australia have united to build a massive “electric highway” of charging stations right around the country

Kids growing wiser at saving money

child holding a piggy bank
mathematics

New research shows children are becoming wiser at saving their pocket money with almost a third of the cash being stashed away

Fastest Rubik’s cube solve ever

Hundreds of rubix cubers flock to Ivanhoe Grammar to compete in the Cube for Cambodia competition. Feliks (yes, FELIKS) Zemdegs broke the World Record with 4.22 seconds. Picture Jay Town.
mathematics

Melbourne student Feliks Zemdegs is the fastest human ever to solve a Rubik’s cube. He took 4.22 seconds. How fast are you?

Lego Titanic docks in top musuem

Brynjar Karl Bigisson. Picture: Titanic Pigeon Forge
mathematics

Autistic teen’s Lego Titanic replica finds a permanent home in top US museum honouring the doomed ocean liner

This 6-year-old boy earns $14 million

Ryan from Ryan's ToyReview is a YouTube star.
humanities

While most six-year-olds are busy playing dress-ups and watching cartoons, one kindergarten boy is raking in millions and millions of dollars by simply reviewing toys online.

Angus’ sweet eye for business

7 year old entrepreneur Angus Walters is taking Darwin by storm with his 'Croc Candy' lollies which will be available at the Croc Cove gift area. Picture: Justin Kennedy
humanities

Grade two entrepreneur Angus Walters is seeing his kooky Croc Candy being snapped up around the Northern Territory

Going cashless at hi-tech tuck shops

10/11/17 Wilderness school students Isabel Graham and Annabel McConnel at their school which is implementing a cashless payment system for their cafe. photo Calum Robertson
mathematics

Canteens are going cashless in schools across Australia as technology changes the way we interact with money

Teacher a Wootube sensation

23/09/2016: Eddie Woo, the head teacher of mathematics, at Cherrybrook Technology High School has started uploading his maths lessons to his YouTube channel "Wootube''. These 'Wootubes' have become a bit of an internet sensation. Eddie recently won the excellence in teaching award in the Choose Maths awards. He's trying to break down the stereotypes around maths and get more kids interested and using technology to connect with students. Hollie Adams/The Australian
mathematics

Sydney mathematics teacher Eddie Woo’s YouTube channel was made for one student. Now it has more than 100,000 subscribers. VIDEO

Student’s winning spinning formula

Joshua Choong 14, has won a national maths competition for his complicated sums using fidget spinners. Picture: David Caird
mathematics

A year 8 Tintern Grammar student’s fidget spinner project has impressed national Maths Talent Quest judges

New iPhone turns your face into an emoji

Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing at Apple, Philip Schiller, introduces the iPhone X during a media event at Apple's new headquarters in Cupertino, California on September 12, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Josh Edelson
technology

Apple has unveiled three new iPhones at an event in Cupertino, California. VIDEO