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Mathematics

Ford LPG Challenge - Around Australia for Around $1000 (Adelaide to Perth leg. Day 3 Cocklebiddy to Kalgoolie. Wester Time Zone road sign along the Nullabor Plain 05 Aug 2006. road sign

Australia’s rebel time zone

mathematics

Look at the clocks in the roadhouses along a remote, 340km section of the highway through the Nullarbor and you’ll see they don’t match anyone’s smartphone time

Chris Pratt faces a rampaging T-Rex dinosaur in a scene from film Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

World’s biggest T-rex unearthed

animals

A massive, fierce dinosaur nicknamed Scotty has been dug from sandstone. Its leg bones are so big it is thought to have weighed 8800kg when it roamed the Earth

Daylight Saving

Daylight saving on way out

mathematics

As Australians in four states grope around in the darkness of the last daylight saving mornings of the season, Europe has voted to cancel this clock-changing practice

Latest

What is a leap year?

Girl watching the stars. Stars are digital illustration.
explainers

February 29 is missing from this year’s calendar. We explain why and what it has to do with the Sun, the Earth and a calendar created way back in 1582

Bees know how to do basic maths

Bee and Honeycomb Bee and Honeycomb Bee and Honeycomb Bee and Honeycomb
mathematics

An Australian study has found that despite having tiny brains, bees can learn to add and subtract 

How we tell the time just got more accurate

This photo released August 22, 2013, courtesy of the National Institute of Standards and Technology shows NIST's ultra-stable ytterbium lattice atomic clock. Ytterbium atoms are generated in an oven (large metal cylinder on the left) and sent to a vacuum chamber in the center of the photo to be manipulated and probed by lasers. Laser light is transported to the clock by five fibers (such as the yellow fiber in the lower center of the photo). A pair of experimental atomic clocks based on ytterbium atoms at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has set a new record for stability. The clocks act like 21st-century pendulums or metronomes that could swing back and forth with perfect timing for a period comparable to the age of the universe. NIST physicists report in the August 22, 2013 issue of Science Express that the ytterbium clocks' tick is more stable than any other atomic clock. Stability can be thought of as how precisely the duration of each tick matches every other tick. AFP PHOTO / NIST == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / NIST / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS ==
mathematics

Since the 1960s, the Earth’s time has run on 400 official clocks that we all use every day without even realising it. But a new kind of almost-perfect clock could change everything

Definition of a kilogram about to change

In this photo taken Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018., a replica of the International Prototype Kilogram is pictured at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, in Sevres, near Paris. The golf ball-sized metal cylinder at the heart of the world's system for measuring mass is heading into retirement. Gathering this week in Versailles, west of Paris, governments on Friday Nov. 16, 2018, are expected to approve a plan to instead use a scientific formula to define the exact weight of a kilo. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
mathematics

Since 1889 we have weighed everything against a little cylinder of metal locked in a vault in France. Now, the world is about to agree to completely change the way it defines a kilogram

Good at maths equals good with money

Pink piggy bank with glasses standing on books next to a blackboard with simple retirement formula. Sharp focus on the piggy bank.
money

Maths and money go hand in hand. Westpac research shows almost all adults believe learning maths is important in helping Aussies be smarter with their money

Hypersonic jet to fly New York-London in two hours

Boeing unveils new hypersonic jet
science

Hypersonic jets that travel five times faster than the speed of sound could be taking passengers by 2030

People power builds Australia’s electric highway

Electric car charging station
environment

Tired of waiting for the government, electric-car owners of Australia have united to build a massive “electric highway” of charging stations right around the country

Kids growing wiser at saving money

child holding a piggy bank
mathematics

New research shows children are becoming wiser at saving their pocket money with almost a third of the cash being stashed away

Fastest Rubik’s cube solve ever

Rubix cubers at Ivanhoe
mathematics

Melbourne student Feliks Zemdegs is the fastest human ever to solve a Rubik’s cube. He took 4.22 seconds. How fast are you?

Lego Titanic docks in top musuem

Brynjar Karl Bigisson
mathematics

Autistic teen’s Lego Titanic replica finds a permanent home in top US museum honouring the doomed ocean liner

This 6-year-old boy earns $14 million

Ryan from Ryan's ToyReview is a YouTube star.
humanities

While most six-year-olds are busy playing dress-ups and watching cartoons, one kindergarten boy is raking in millions and millions of dollars by simply reviewing toys online.

Angus’ sweet eye for business

Croc Candy
humanities

Grade two entrepreneur Angus Walters is seeing his kooky Croc Candy being snapped up around the Northern Territory

Going cashless at hi-tech tuck shops

Cashless lunch
mathematics

Canteens are going cashless in schools across Australia as technology changes the way we interact with money

Teacher a Wootube sensation

WooTube
mathematics

Sydney mathematics teacher Eddie Woo’s YouTube channel was made for one student. Now it has more than 100,000 subscribers. VIDEO

Student’s winning spinning formula

Fidget spinner maths student
mathematics

A year 8 Tintern Grammar student’s fidget spinner project has impressed national Maths Talent Quest judges

New iPhone turns your face into an emoji

Apple press conference
technology

Apple has unveiled three new iPhones at an event in Cupertino, California. VIDEO