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Schoolkids across Australia have put their thinking caps on, put away their uniforms and raised money to help farmers

May 8, 2019 6:30PM Kids News

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Breanna, Ellie, Cody, Haileigh and Harry from Wyee Public School in NSW dressed up as farmers to raise money. Picture: Liam Driver media_cameraBreanna, Ellie, Cody, Haileigh and Harry from Wyee Public School in NSW dressed up as farmers to raise money. Picture: Liam Driver

humanities

Reading level: green

Kids across Australia have been working to raise money for the Adopt A Farmer drought campaign, dressing up, dressing down and selling a lot of cake.

At Wyee Public School in NSW, there was an obvious farming theme to the mufti* or casual clothes day, with broad-brimmed hats, work shirts, jeans and work boots replacing the usual bright blue uniform. To dress up for the day, students gave a gold-coin donation towards the charity* Rural Aid.

Sweet treats were on the menu at Willoughby Girls High School in Sydney, NSW. Instead of wearing something other than their uniforms, the students baked cupcakes to sell to raise money.

And they had more customers than usual, with NSW politicians dropping in to show their appreciation for the students’ efforts to raise money to help farmers.

NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro and NSW Education Minister Sarah Mitchell couldn’t resist a cupcake — or two — with icing and sprinkles.

 

 

Students at Willoughby Girls High School in NSW cooked and sold cakes for the Adopt a Farmer campaign. Pictured left to right are Grace, NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro, Thalia, NSW Education Minister Sarah Mitchell and Namika. Picture: Sam Ruttyn media_cameraStudents at Willoughby Girls High School in NSW cooked and sold cakes for the Adopt a Farmer campaign. Pictured left to right are Grace, NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro, Thalia, NSW Education Minister Sarah Mitchell and Namika. Picture: Sam Ruttyn

 

It’s not too late for your school to get behind the Adopt A Farmer drought campaign to raise much-needed money for charity Rural Aid or to show how much you care by writing letters of support to farmers. Details of all the ways you and your school can be involved in the Adopt A Farmer drought campaign are below.

 

HOW YOU CAN HELP — ADOPT A FARMER
1. Schools are encouraged to hold a uniform-free day (mufti day or casual clothes day) or other activity to raise money.

2. Students who take part to donate a gold coin. Schools to bank donations by direct deposit into Rural Aid bank account (Account name: Rural Aid — Adopt A farmer) BSB: 114-879 and Account No: 478 388 542.

3. Students are urged to write a letter to a farmer about why you want to support them and about your school and students. Send the letter via email to: adoptafarmer@news.com.au

4. A farmer taking part in the campaign will write back to your school.

5. Rural Aid will distribute $100 to as many farmers as possible so they can spend the money in their local communities and help keep the local economy alive.

FLY TO VISIT A DROUGHT-AFFECTED FARMER
Qantas will fly 5 students and their teacher to a community to meet farmers.

In 25 words or less, tell us why you should be selected.

To enter, email adoptafarmer@news.com.au

HOW HAS THE DROUGHT AFFECTED YOU?
IGA will give $1000 gift vouchers to 20 students in rural communities who write their own stories telling us how the drought has affected them.

To enter, email your stories to adoptafarmer@news.com.au

 

 

Dipti, Maang Maang, Nad and Told from Croydon Primary School in Victoria left their uniforms at home to raise money for the Adopt A Farmer campaign. Picture: Tony Gough media_cameraDipti, Maang Maang, Nad and Told from Croydon Primary School in Victoria left their uniforms at home to raise money for the Adopt A Farmer campaign. Picture: Tony Gough

GLOSSARY

  • mufti: a slang word meaning casual clothes rather than uniform
  • charity: an organisation that helps those in need; also means help

EXTRA READING

Dam levels drop as big dry drags on

Kids urge farmers to ‘keep believing’

Harry cooks up good idea with classmates

Battle to keep school grass green

Explainer: What is drought?

Drought pushes food prices higher

How you can Adopt A Farmer

QUICK QUIZ

  1. Why did schoolkids not wear their uniforms?
  2. How did Willoughby Girls High students raise money?
  3. Who is the money going to?
  4. What is the Adopt A Farmer campaign for?
  5. Have you heard of other ways people are raising money to help farmers? What are they?

LISTEN TO THIS STORY

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
1. Celebrate!
Did your school do anything for farmers today or in recent days?

If you did, write a news report for your school newsletter, local paper or Kids News about the activities that happened in your school. Don’t forget to add pictures (you can draw them if you want).

If your school did not, think about some activities that your school could do to support our farmers. Create a timetable of some activities (be inspired by today’s story!) and design a poster encouraging kids in your school to join in.

Time: allow 30 minutes to complete this activity
Curriculum Links: English, Visual Communication Design, Personal and Social Capability

2. Extension
What do you think should be done with the money that has been raised today?  Think about all of the things that you have learned from the Adopt a Farmer stories in Kids News. Then, write a list of the five most important and useful things that you think farmers need. Next to each item on your list, write sentences giving the reasons why you chose this.

Time: allow 25 minutes to complete this activity 
Curriculum Links: Critical and Creative Thinking, English

VCOP ACTIVITY
News Flash!
Create some new and powerful headlines to capture the community spirit of the Adopt A Farmer campaign.

Ollie Opener can help you will this. How can you gain the audience’s attention right away?

HAVE YOUR SAY: Has your school held a drought fundraiser? Are you planning one in the future?
No one-word answers. Use full sentences to explain your thinking. No comments will be published until approved by editors.

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