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Fans show their support for the young royals but an Australian is more committed than most

Donna Coutts, April 29, 2018 7:00AM Kids News

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Jan Hugo and her husband David with their royal collection. media_cameraJan Hugo and her husband David with their royal collection.

humanities

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It’s an exciting time for royal fans and royal souvenir collectors, with the birth of Prince William and Catherine’s new son, Prince Louis of Cambridge.

There’s also Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s royal wedding to look forward to on May 19.

But if there was a prize for the most excited and committed* royalists*, an Australian fan would surely win that prize.

A NSW woman has spent $188,000 filling her four-bedroom house with more than 10,000 royal souvenirs*.

Jan Hugo could have the biggest royal collection in the world. Picture: Supplied. media_cameraJan Hugo could have the biggest royal collection in the world. Picture: Supplied.

Jan Hugo and husband David eat and drink with the Windsors every evening — all from the comfort of their home in the Hunter Valley, thousands of kilometres from the royal family’s Buckingham Palace or Windsor Castle.

Royalist Jan, who is 59 years old, has collected more than 10,000 royal souvenirs — also called memorabilia — over the past 36 years — spending an average of $100 a week on her collection.

Some of the Royal family at Buckingham Palace last year, including Princes Charles, the Queen and Prince Phillip, Catherine and Prince William with Princess Charlotte and Prince George in front. Ms Hugo collects souvenirs about all these royals. Picture: WireImage. media_cameraSome of the Royal family at Buckingham Palace last year, including Princes Charles, the Queen and Prince Phillip, Catherine and Prince William with Princess Charlotte and Prince George in front. Ms Hugo collects souvenirs about all these royals. Picture: WireImage.

Ms Hugo’s house is like a museum. In fact, from 2013 she has been opening the house to visitors and believes she could have the largest royal collection in the world.

Her collection looks set to keep growing as more memorabilia is made for the royal wedding and to celebrate the birth of the new Prince.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding is on May 19. Picture: MEGA. media_cameraPrince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding is on May 19. Picture: MEGA.

The baby Prince, whose full name is Louis Arthur Charles and will be known as His Royal Highness Prince Louis of Cambridge, was born on April 23. He is fifth in line to be king. There are laws that decide which order members of the royal family would become King or Queen. The baby Prince Louis, who is Prince William and Catherine’s third child, is fifth in line to the throne*.

Next in line after Queen Elizabeth is no longer Queen is his grandfather, Princes Charles, then his father, Prince William, then Prince Louis’ older brother George and older sister Charlotte.

A recent law change means Princess Charlotte stays ahead of her younger brother in the queue for the throne. In the past, a male, even if they were younger, would move ahead of an older sister in the line.

GLOSSARY

  • committed: dedicated
  • royalists: a fan of royalty
  • souvenirs: objects to remember something or someone by
  • throne: the chair the king or queen sits on; whoever is allowed to sit on the throne is in charge of the royal family

LISTEN TO TODAY’S STORY

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
1. New Royal Baby
The proud parents Prince William and Duchess Catherine have welcomed their third child into the world and named him Louis Arthur Charles. Create a card congratulating them and Louis’ older brother and sister on the new addition to the family.

The name of the new Prince has family significance. Both his father (Prince William) and brother (George) have Louis as a middle name and it is also the name of his great grandfather’s (Prince Phillip’s) mentor. Arthur is also one of his father’s and grandfather’s (Prince Charles) middle names and of course, Charles is the first name of his grandfather.

People choose names for their babies for many reasons. Where did your name come from? You may need to ask your parents or grandparents. Why was this particular name chosen for you? Survey members of your class to find out other stories of where their names came from.

Extension: Family tree

Draw a family tree of the British royal family showing the line of succession for the throne. Begin with the Queen and Prince Phillip (her husband) at the top, follow with their four children. Next will be the Queen’s grandchildren and finally her great-grandchildren (of which Prince Louis is one).

Number the members of the family according to their order in the succession to the throne. You may need to do some research to find out all the family members.

Time: Allow 30 minutes
Curriculum links: English, The Humanities – Civics and Citizenship, History, The Arts – Visual Arts

2. Collecting
Royalists Jan Hugo and her husband David have a massive collection of royal memorabilia.

What positives are there for Jan and David for having this collection in their house?

What problems can you envisage with a collection this size? Can you suggest ways to solve these problems?

What other things do people collect? Find out if any of your classmates collect something or know of someone who is a collector? Make a list of the interesting things that people collect.

Extension: To become head of the British monarchy you need to be born into the family. There are laws that decide who will be the next as king or queen.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of this system? Draw up a two-column chart listing the advantages and disadvantages of a system where birth order dictates who will be the next to be in charge.

Time: Allow 30 minuntes
Curriculum links: English, The Humanities – Civics and Citizenship, History, Critical and Creative thinking.

Extra Resources: Access to information about the royal family, card-making materials

VCOP ACTIVITY
With a partner see if you can you identify all the doing words/verbs in this text.

Highlight them in yellow and then make a list of them all down your page.

Now see if you and your partner can come up with a synonym for the chosen verb.

Make sure it still makes the context it was taken from.

Try and see if you can replace some of the original verbs with your synonyms and discuss if any are better and why.

Curriculum Links: English, Big Write and VCOP

IN ONE SENTENCE, TELL US WHAT YOU THINK ABOUT THIS STORY
Please do not use one-word answers. Explain what you enjoyed or found interesting about the article. Use lots of adjectives.

Extra Reading in humanities