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Warning on harmful sour lollies

Lauren Ferri, April 28, 2022 7:00PM Kids News

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Kids and parents are being warned about the damage sour lollies can do to teeth and tongues. Picture: Tim Carrafa media_cameraKids and parents are being warned about the damage sour lollies can do to teeth and tongues. Picture: Tim Carrafa

health

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Children and parents are being warned about the dangers of sour lollies after a young boy suffered burns to his tongue.

Shocking images of the Perth child’s burns were posted to social media, showing layers of his tongue blistered from the product’s high acidity*.

Safety and first aid service CPR Kids posted the photos, saying it hoped to spread awareness around the potentially dangerous treats.

“Sour candy packaging often stipulates* that children under four shouldn’t eat the sweets and that consuming multiple lollies quickly can cause ‘temporary irritation to sensitive tongues and mouths’,” CPR Kids wrote.

Parents are being warned sour lollies can cause burns to young children. Picture: Facebook media_cameraCPR Kids posted this picture of a Perth boy whose tongue was burnt while eating sour lollies. Picture: Facebook

It is not known which brand of lolly the child in the photo consumed, but CPR Kids said Warheads and TNT were brands consumed widely across the country.

“We understand that the labels come with warnings, but dentists say the lollies should be avoided altogether due to the acidic* coating (regardless of age),” CPR Kids wrote.

CPR Kids said the results of lab tests on sour lollies were quite “concerning” with most lollies found to be more acidic than vinegar.

Parents are being warned sour lollies can cause burns to young children. Picture: Facebook media_cameraTNT sour spray lollies are one of the popular brands on the market in Australia. Picture: Facebook

In a lengthy post warning parents, the Dental Association of Australia’s Jonathon Teoh echoed the warning.

He said the lollies could be “very dangerous” because of their “high level of acid or PH which can cause chemical burns”.

Melbourne mum Kirsty Wright shared daughter Willow’s painful experience after eating 10 of her brother’s sour Warhead lollies late last year.

Willow, 4, ran to her mother screaming about burning pain on her tongue.

“They had burnt her tongue, she was beside herself,” she told Tiny Hearts Education.

Ms Wright said her daughter had suffered a severe chemical reaction, which left a hole in her tongue.

Supplied Editorial Parents are being warned sour lollies can cause burns to young  children. Picture: Facebook media_cameraFour year old Willow’s tongue was damaged when she ate 10 sour lollies. Picture: Facebook

Consumer advocacy* group Choice said while the injuries were painful, they were not likely to be permanent.

“The soft tissues of the mouth will usually repair without much problem,” a report stated.

“The more insidious* issue with sour lollies is their increased potential for irreversibly* damaging teeth.”

GLOSSARY

  • acidity: the amount of acid in a substance
  • stipulates: says what is allowed or necessary
  • acidic: containing acid
  • advocacy: arguing on behalf of or supporting an idea
  • insidious: gradually and secretly causing harm
  • irreversibly: in a way that cannot be reversed or fixed

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QUICK QUIZ

  1. Packaging on sour lollies often suggests they should not be eaten by children under what age?
  2. Tests showed most sour lollies were more acidic than what?
  3. How many sour lollies did four-year-old Willow eat?
  4. What brand of sour lollies did she eat?
  5. Consumer group Choice warned sour lollies could cause irreversible damage to what?

LISTEN TO THIS STORY

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
1. Write a song
Write the words for a song or nursery rhyme that will help little kids understand why they should never eat sour lollies. Your song should be simple and easy for kids to remember.

Time: allow 25 minutes to complete this activity
Curriculum Links: English, Science, Health and Physical Education

2. Extension
Can you come up with the perfect lolly? Describe, draw and name the perfect yummy treat that you would create for kids. Your lolly should be safe for kids of all ages to enjoy!

Time: allow 30 minutes to complete this activity
Curriculum Links: English, Design and Technologies, Health and Physical Education

VCOP ACTIVITY
Imaginative dialogue
Imagine you were there during one of the events being discussed in the article, or for the interview.

Create a conversation between two characters from the article – you may need or want to include yourself as one of the characters. Don’t forget to try to use facts and details from the article to help make your dialogue as realistic as possible.

Go through your writing and highlight any punctuation you have used in green. Make sure you carefully check the punctuation used for the dialogue and ensure you have opened and closed the speaking in the correct places.

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