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Health

Mark Knight's V is for vaccine cartoon.

Jane’s V the sign of a little victory for science

news

The first COVID-19 vaccination to be given in Australia was big news and though the photo opportunity didn’t quite go to plan, a V for Vaccine could be taken to mean a V for Victory after all

Aldabra Giant Tortoise Training Melbourne Zoo

Animals lend a helping hand at the zoo

animals

Melbourne Zoo’s oldest residents have shown no one’s ever too old to learn. Elephant Mek Kapah and tortoises Wilbur, Little John and Jean are all involved in their own health checks

(L-R) Imogen (18) and brother Brady (11) say gaming has helped them stay in touch with friends during covid. Boys aged 11 who play video games are 24 per cent less likely to be depressed than non gamers three years later. More of a worry is the time girls spend on social media sites such as Snapchat and TikTok, because it can make them feel depressed. Picture: Josie Hayden

Video games may help boys bond, study finds

technology

Boys who aren’t active are not harmed by playing video games, a new study has found. More of a concern is the time girls spend on social media sites such as Snapchat and TikTok

Latest

Big thrill when coronavirus vaccine arrived

Mark Knight's Pfizer vaccine cartoon. Right-click on the image to open in a new tab.
health

Health Minister Greg Hunt was so excited when Australia’s first vaccine delivery arrived he was doing cartwheels — at least in cartoonist Mark Knight’s imagination

The search for Australia’s healthiest lunchbox

Healthy Harold from Life Education with his healthy lunchbox. For Kids News
ask healthy harold

Healthy Harold has been looking for Australia’s healthiest lunchbox and he’s found some pretty impressive options. Check out the winning lunches

How does the coronavirus vaccine work?

Concept for the worldwide delivery of COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine by plane.
explainers

The first Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine doses have arrived in Australia and the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine now has approval to be used in Australia too. Kids News looks at how vaccines work

COVID maths: All the world’s virus in a drink can

mathematics

All the COVID-19-causing virus in the world right now could easily fit inside a single soft drink can, according to a fascinating calculation by a mathematician

New ads urge teens to rethink sugary drinks

Rethink Sugary Drink alliance is launching their ÒFull of CrapÓ counter-campaign on Monday. It hijacks sugary drink companiesÕ manipulative marketing and advertising tactics, with the aim of urging young people (males aged 14-24 are AustraliaÕs highest consumers of sugary drinks) to rethink their sugary drink consumption.1 in 6 teens downs 5.2kg of sugar each year from sugary drinks alone. (L-R) Kieran Johns (13), James Georgiou (13) and Nathan John (13) pouring 5.2kg of sugar into a bowl. Picture: Josie Hayden
health

Teenagers and young men are the targets of new ads designed to shock them about how easy it is to be sucked into ads for sugary drinks and get hooked on drinking them

Warner girls are great all rounders

WEEKEND TELEGRAPH - 2/10/20

MUST NOT PUBLISH WITHOUT CLEARING WITH WEEKEND PIC ED JEFF DARMANIN - 

Candice Warner and kids Ivy (6yrs old on right) and Indi (4yrs old) at Kensington Oval this morning playing some cricket. Picture: Sam Ruttyn
sport

Star batsman David Warner’s girls love cricket — and quite a few other sports too. And their mum, Candice, wouldn’t have it any other way

Do you have a question for Healthy Harold?

Healthy Harold from Life Education in a face mask. For Kids News
ask healthy harold

Have you ever wondered how your body makes your heart beat or why face masks help protect us from COVID-19? Healthy Harold has the answers. Send him your questions

Farewell Sir Tom, inspiration to millions

British World War II veteran Captain Sir Tom Moore, who raised over £32 million for the NHS during the Coronavirus pandemic, has died after being diagnosed with Covid-19. MARSTON MORETAINE, ENGLAND - In this handout image provided by Capture the Light Photography, Colonel Tom Moore and his daughter Hannah celebrate his 100th birthday, with an RAF flypast provided by a Spitfire and a Hurricane over his home on April 30, 2020 in Marston Moretaine, England. Colonel Moore, formerly a Captain, received a promotion in honour of his 100th birthday and in recognition of the funds, in excess of £29m, he raised for the NHS by walking laps of his garden. (Emma Sohl - Capture the Light Photography via Getty Images)
humanities

Captain Sir Tom Moore, the UK World War II veteran who walked up and down his garden to raise money for health care workers, has died after testing positive for COVID-19. He was 100

Robots to the rescue for kids too sick for class

Ethan Waller schooling from his home in Sandgate with The Lakes College students Lachlan Aitken and Ashleigh Stevens, Wednesday, January 27, 2021 - Picture: Richard Walker
health

A telepresence robot nicknamed robo-ethan is helping Ethan Waller attend class virtually and keep connected with his classmates while he can’t be at school in person

Study finds ideal after-school screen hours

Ethan, 9, and Ryan Arnold, 13, at home, in Sans Souci, today. They play video games in the school holidays mainly and the parents say they have to finish their schoolwork before they spend time on the computer.
(Computer games story)
Picture:Justin Lloyd.
technology

A study has found the ideal number of hours students can spend online and playing video games before screen time slows development and affects NAPLAN test results

Queensland schoolgirl gets special 3D-printed ear

Grace Smart with mum Debbie Smart pose for a photograph in a park in Goodna. Grace Smart was born a non-identical twin at 29 weeks with right sided anotia (absent external ear). Friday January 22, 2021. Picture, John Gass
health

A 10-year-old girl has become the first person to receive a patient-matched 3D-printed ear in groundbreaking surgery just in time for the start of the new school year

Australian surgeons rebuild girl’s spine

HOLD FOR SATURDAY/SUNDAY HERALD SUN PIC DESK------ The Children First Foundation has brought Nichole Jamelo over from the Phillipines to have her spine operated on at Epworth Hospital in Richmond.    Nichole back at the retreat after surgery. .  Picture: Alex Coppel.
health

Standing straight and walking tall for the first time in her life, 11-year-old Nichole Jamelo can’t wait to take on the world now that two 90-degree bends in her spine have been straightened out

How much sleep do I need?

Healthy Harold from Life Education. For Ask Healthy Harold column on Kids News
ask healthy harold

Healthy Harold has lots of advice to help keep kids safe, happy and healthy. See his tips for getting a good night’s sleep and his answers to some of your great questions

US election, coronavirus top 2020 Google searches

(COMBO) This combination of files pictures created on November 4, 2020, shows Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden after speaking during election night at the Chase Center in Wilmington, Delaware; and US President Donald Trump on election night in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, early on November 4, 2020. - Twitter confirmed on November 21, 2020, it will hand control of the presidential @POTUS account to Joe Biden when he is sworn in on inauguration day, even if President Donald Trump has not conceded his election loss. (Photos by ANGELA  WEISS and MANDEL NGAN / AFP)
news

It has been a year dominated by crises, from bushfires to coronavirus, yet neither were the most Google-searched terms in Australia. Instead, ‘US election’ was the most searched-for term

Healthy Harold is here to answer your questions

Healthy Harold with blue balloon background. For Kids News
ask healthy harold

Do you have a question about health and safety? Healthy Harold is here to help. Send him your question now.

Cricket star grows all out for charity

NSW cricketers Sean Abbott (L), Moises Henriques (centre) and Daniel Hughes (R) prepare for Movember in 2020. For Kids News. Supplied by Cricket Australia
health

They might look a bit funny, but there’s a serious message behind the moustaches sprouting from some of our star sportsmen, including cricketer Moises Henriques

Vaccine maker ‘near ecstatic’ after study result

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: People walk by the Pfizer headquarters on November 9, 2020 in New York City. Pharmaceutical company Pfizer announced positive early results on its COVID-19 vaccine trial and has proven to be 90% effective in preventing infection of the virus.   David Dee Delgado/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
health

The Pfizer coronavirus vaccine has shown a 90 per cent effectiveness rate in tests, boosting global confidence. Australia last week ordered 10 million doses of this particular vaccine

Aussies are living longer as boys close the gap on girls

Life expectancy has increased to 85 for females and 80.9 years for males born in Australia today. iStock image. For Kids News
humanities

A girl born today can expect to live to 85, while boys can expect to live to almost 81. But males are slowly closing the life expectancy gap on females

Aussie kids need less homework, more play

Single confused student studying reading notes sitting in a bar stressed high school kids . Picture: istock
health

Homework headaches and “competitive parenting’’ are fuelling kids’ anxiety, Australia’s new National Children’s Commissioner warned, calling for kids to get more time to relax and play

Special ‘covid stamp’ printed on toilet paper

A customer puts a so-called "corona stamp" on a letter in a post office, as the 2.75 euro "corona stamp" is printed on three-ply toilet paper and sold individually as part of a 10 cm wide sheet, in Vienna, Austria October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
humanities

A European postal service has printed a stamp on toilet paper to reinforce an important coronavirus message — as Australia releases its own pandemic-related stamp

‘Bionic spine’ brings hope to people with disabilities

Melbourne researchers developing a "bionic spine" - effectively allowing a person to control robotic limbs through their thoughts. Royal Melbourne Hospital lead researchers Dr Tom Oxley and Dr Nick Opie are in the early stages of development.       Photo David Caird
science

Melbourne scientists and surgeons have given patients with disabilities the power to work computers with their mind in a world-first “bionic spine” breakthrough

A typical day in the life of a ballet dancer

Naomi Hibberd Picture: Prudence Upton
arts

To celebrate World Ballet Day, Kids News talked to Australian dancer Naomi Hibberd about what she loves and finds challenging about being a dancer, plus what her typical day looks like

Gut bacteria could help control allergies, asthma

Yvonne Michaels and her two daughters (Giselle – 10 years old, Chloe – 7 years old) takes a holistic approach to managing her and their asthma.
Picture by Wayne Taylor 27th October 2020
health

There are positive signs in new research that hay fever, asthma, eczema and other allergies — which affect one in three Australians — could be controlled by improving your gut health

Cricket star’s message to kids: tough times won’t last

Portrait of Australia's Alyssa Healy ahead of the ICC T20 Women's World Cup which starts tomorrow at Spotless Stadium in Sydney. Picture. Phil Hillyard
sport

She’s a superstar of Australian sport, but things haven’t always gone to plan for cricketer Alyssa Healy. Here’s her advice for bouncing back from difficult times

Hope for diabetics in three-minute thesis

University of Adelaide PhD candidate Khalia Primer, 23 originally from Cleve on the Eyre Peninsula, in the laboratory at SAHMRI. She working on gene therapy to treat diabetic ulcers. 14 September 2020. Picture Dean Martin
science

Scientist Khalia Primer’s award-winning video cleverly explains years of complex gene therapy research that could help solve some of the serious health problems faced by people with diabetes

Mighty mice keep muscles in space

Astronaut to Mars
space

As humans get ready for long trips to Mars, scientists are working on how to keep them strong and healthy by studying astronaut mice with big muscles sent to the International Space Station

Bullied by a friend? It’s still bullying

Cyber bullying. iStock image. For Kids News and Hibernation
safe-kids

Young people are less likely to recognise behaviour as bullying if it is coming from someone they consider a friend, according to a new study from online mental health organisation ReachOut

Time outdoors is good medicine for hi-tech kids

For a story about SAHMRI/UniAdl research on the benefits of green time versus screen time.Lenny,7 and Nash,4, in their backyard having green time on the 2nd September 2020. Pic Tait Schmaal.
health

New research has found green time can reduce the negative effects of too much screen time in front of TVs, computers and video games for kids

School drops old uniform in favour of activewear

Kingswood College students Will, Kai and Ava  in the school's new active wear.
health

A Victorian school has decided to ditch its traditional school uniform, hoping new activewear will helps students be happier and healthier and take part in more physical activity

Human blood is warm, but cool too!

3D render blood cells.
science

Kids News is celebrating National Science Week by taking a look at the approximately five litres of hardworking red blood pumping around a person’s body that gives us our get up and go

How to find your voice and talk to a crowd

Kailash Sarma, 17, is teaching young people how to master public speaking and improve their confidence and self-esteem. His Captivate the Future program is open to secondary students around the country. For Kids News and Hibernation
humanities

A teenage public-speaking whiz is on a mission to help kids reeling from coronavirus disruptions master the art of talking to a crowd, finding their voice and their confidence

Simple steps to ease your worries in tough times

Beautiful, fit young family walking and jogging together outdoors along a paved sidewalk in a park pushing a stroller at sunset
health

There are things you can do to keep up your spirits and maintain a sense of hope if you feel worried about the coronavirus pandemic, writes Beyond Blue’s Dr Grant Blashki

Kids helping kids with One=One campaign

Caloundra State High School Year 9 school council representatives Jack Webster and Claire Thomme believe ensuring students eat well is vital to their chances of a good education.
For Hibernation and Kids News. FareShare and News Corp support a campaign called One=One: Feed a Friend as part of The Feed Appeal.
Students at Caloundra State High School, Queensland, are planning to raise money to help the campaign and have applied for a Rural Schools Grant as part of The Feed Appeal to help provide breakfast and lunch to students in need. Picture: supplied
humanities

In rural and remote Australia, one in four kids comes to school without breakfast or lunch. To help, Kids News is supporting One=One, which means $1 raised provides one meal

Plastic waste found in seafood

Francisca Ribeiro and her team of UQ researchers discovers alarming levels of microplastic in seafood.
environment

Researchers have discovered alarming levels of microplastics in sardines, prawns, oysters and crabs

Gut play: look inside your insides in real time

Small intestine anatomy of male - Stock image Small intestine anatomy of male - Stock image
technology

Ever wondered what the inside of your stomach looks like? Now you can see for yourself with new Australian technology to give patients real-time vision of their insides

Heatwave Harry? Naming the threat may save lives

TOPSHOT - A woman looks through the glass of the enclosure of a Polar bear as he cools off in the water at the zoo in Mulhouse on August 3, 2018, as parts of Europe continue to swelter in an ongoing heatwave.    / AFP PHOTO / SEBASTIEN BOZON
weather

Giving heatwaves names and strength ratings, as for cyclones, could help people in hot places such as Australia understand how dangerous they are, particularly as heatwaves worsen in future

Lump on leg shows dinosaurs got cancer

Centrosaurus dinosaur, bones from which are being excavated live at the Australian Museum in Sydney.
science

It’s tempting to think of dinosaurs as supernatural or mythical beasts but we now know for sure they were affected by many of the same diseases as humans and other animals, including cancer

Aussie dogs to train as pandemic sniffer force

University of Adelaide researchers Dr Anne-Lise Chaber and Dr Susan Hazel with a pet dog (black labrador), which is one of the breeds that will be trained to sniff out COVID-19 in people.
health

The first COVID-sniffing dogs could be on patrol in airports, hospitals or quarantine within months as Australian scientists work to deploy puppy power in the hunt for unidentified patients

‘Karen’s’ mask fight not just about her rights

Knight cartoon for 27/7/20  the Karen plague
civics

Like a school essay, a cartoon is a way to compare and contrast two sides to an issue. In this case it’s about someone demanding their rights but forgetting their responsibilities to the vulnerable

Solved: the mystery of smelly armpits

RendezView. Closeup portrait of woman looking at man closing, covering nose, something stinks, very bad smell, odor. Guy sniffs himself. Isolated on white background. Negative emotion, facial expression, feeling.
science

Scientists now understand the substances that make armpits smell, that they predate Homo sapiens and they may have had an important role in communication between our ancestors

Aussie invents paint to beat coronavirus

Aussie scientist Dr William Ducker.
science

In what may be one of the biggest breakthroughs yet in combating COVID-19, a scientist has invented a surface coating that wipes out the virus and may continue working for years

Cartoonist says sorry for taking the mickey

Mark Knight's cartoon on Greg Hunt
news

We all know when you try to do something in front of a camera, things don’t turn out quite as you would like them to. This was the case with the Health Minister and his face mask

KFC plans to 3D print chicken nuggets

Want nerves with that? Picture: Thinkstock
science

A fast-food chicken chain is creating lab-grown meat made from stem cells to create a “meat for the future”, as a burger chain feeds cattle lemongrass to try to cut methane emissions

Uncomfortable uniforms could force girls out of sport

Abbey Tyrrell, 12, Lily Murrihy, 13, and  Bronte Mosley, 13 in their footy and basketball uniforms for a story on whether the cut/design/sizing of uniforms for use at school and comps affects the desire of girls to continue playing sport.  Picture: Alex Coppel.
sport

Girls are dropping out of sport at high rates as they move from tweens to teens and a new study is looking to see if uniforms are part of the problem

Calls to change cheese health star rating

Dairy is being overlooked as a source of protein and "good" fats, with products such as cheese often getting a bad name. Despite being part of the super "five food groups" - which also include meat and lentils. Nicolas 7, loves to tuck into a warm stringy cheese toastie in Winter.       Picture: David Caird
health

Despite more than 90 per cent of Australians not eating enough dairy, cheese is being overlooked as a source of calcium and “good” fats, with some cheeses only rating 1.5 health stars

Roadblock stops Premier’s getaway

Knight cartoon for 14/7/20  on Dan Andrews and roadblocks
news

Cartoonist Mark Knight discusses Victoria’s change of circumstances as coronavirus case numbers increase, and whether Premier Daniel Andrews is running away from responsibility

Dog becomes essential worker during pandemic

Eros carries a basket of bread from the El Porvenir mini-market as he makes a delivery on his own in Medellin, Colombia, Tuesday, July 7, 2020. The eight-year-old chocolate Labrador remembers the names of customers who have previously rewarded him with treats, and with some practice, he has learned to go to their houses on his own. “He helps us to maintain social distancing,” said Eros’ owner Maria Natividad Botero, amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (AP Photo/Luis Benavides)
animals

A chocolate Labrador has been doing an important job to help people stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, delivering food in a straw basket around his neighbourhood

Virus spread leads to remote learning return

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JUNE 26: A sign for Covid-19 Testing is seen at the entrance to Chadstone shopping Centre on June 26, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. Victoria has recorded 30 new COVID-19 cases overnight, as testing a blitz has begun in Melbourne suburbs that have been identified as community transmission hotspots for coronavirus. Restrictions in Victoria have been tightened due to the spike in new cases across the state with premier Daniel Andrews extending the current state of emergency for at least four weeks to allow police the power to enforce social distancing rules. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
news

Melbourne students have an extra week of holidays as schools face a return to remote learning while the city battles a second wave of coronavirus infections.

Why do we get wrinkly skin as we age?

Senior woman with wrinkles, posing in studio, close-up, portrait
explainers

Wrinkles are a normal part of ageing, except for the wrinkly fingers and toes people of any age can get when they’ve been in the bath or pool for too long. Kids News researched wrinkles

Getting used to our strange ‘new normal’

Part of Mark Knight's cartoon.
news

A WWII Lancaster bomber aeroplane in the COVID-test queue? Our lives have changed so much in recent months not much surprises us any more, writes cartoonist Mark Knight

Concerns over spike in Victorian COVID-19 cases

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews speaks to the media during a press conference at Treasury Theatre in Melbourne, Saturday, June 20, 2020. (AAP Image/Luis Ascui) NO ARCHIVING
health

Victoria’s new coronavirus cases — including AFL player Conor McKenna — are causing concern about how this could impact Australia’s economic recovery, reopening borders and sport

Vitamin D could help fight food allergies in kids

A lack of vitamin D is being looked at as a cause of childhood allergies. Researchers from the Murdoch Children's Research Institute are launching a new study probing wether vitamin D supplements could help prevent allergies in infants and kids. mum Kiandra Ward and baby Toby 13mths, are taking part in the study.    Picture: David Caird
health

Australia has the world’s highest rate of childhood food allergies but researchers hope a simple vitamin supplement could help change that.

Teens making music about COVID-19

A singer shares COVID-19 messages
humanities

June 20 is World Refugee Day. Kids News shares a film by a teenager at Bidi Bidi refugee camp in Uganda about young people making music to help stop the spread of COVID-19

Call to ban junk food on kids’ social media

Bucking the fast food trend, healthy teens Francesca 14 and friend Issy 15 love a good smooth and making a mess in the kitchen.    Picture: David Caird
health

Fast-food companies are bombarding children and teenagers on social media with ads for unhealthy junk food and drinks, according to a new study. Researchers want the ads banned

Trial to ‘switch off’ severe allergies in kids

An immunotherapy treatment, which has shown long-lasting effects against peanut allergy where participants were given a probiotic together with peanut protein, is now being extended to eggs. Jamie Stevenson 9, who is under immunotherapy treatment for egg allergy, is excited about being able to finally eat eggs after treatment.    Picture: David Caird
health

Kids could live free of life-threatening egg allergies thanks to a treatment being trialled by Australian researchers in Melbourne after the success of a similar trial for peanuts allergies

Goalkicking yips could be in players’ heads

Marcus Bontempelli of the Bulldogs after missing a set shot at goal during the Round 23 AFL match between the Richmond Tigers and the Western Bulldogs at the MCG in Melbourne, Saturday, August 25, 2018. (AAP Image/Mark Dadswell) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
sport

Have you ever wondered why footballers struggle to convert set shots for goal? Australian sports scientists believe the answer could be all in the mind

Young minds rise to the challenge

smart kid, thinker. iStock image. For Kids News Hibernation story on Westpac Youth Impact Challenge
humanities

They might be young but they’re thinking big. Find out how the Westpac Youth Impact Challenge is inspiring kid entrepreneurs who want to make the world a better place

Search for solutions to sports’ COVID-19 problems

Eane Whitton from Buffalo Sports and Andrew Fitzgerald, MD of Gospel Whiskey have
made some sports ball suitable sanitiser spray. Picture: Mark Stewart
sport

As clubs and players prepare to return to training and playing sport, people are working to find solutions to COVID-19-related challenges, including how to legally sanitise a cricket ball

Molly’s on the run for good cause

Molly Bremner is a very small 9yo but loves running 10km every day and also runs marathons. In September she will be running from Melbourne to Canberra for Children's Cancer Institute, with her mum Angela Bremner riding beside her on her bike.  Picture: David Caird
sport

Pint-sized Molly loves to run — and she’s planning to do it all the way from her Melbourne home to Canberra to raise money for children’s brain cancer.

Insulin that mimics venom of deep-sea snail

HUMAN insulin modified to mimic the venom of a deep sea snail could help speed up diabetes treatments and improve outcomes. Mum Jade Erickson says fast acting insulin would help son Justin, 11 and husband Michael, 45, who both suffer from the disease. Parents Jade and Michael Erickson with kids Justin, 11 and sister Jaimi, 13. Picture: Jason Edwards
science

Scientists in Australia have described as possibly life changing the invention of human insulin that mimics cone snail venom insulin, working almost instantly to lower blood sugar levels

Dusty models COVID-safe return to AFL season

Mark Knight on Dusty return to AFL
sport

There’s a small light at the end of the coronavirus tunnel with the AFL’s announcement of a restart to the footy season. Mark Knight imagines how Tigers star Dustin Martin could help

Caring for the billions of microbes in your mouth

All sugary drinks are being banned at Melbourne museum to improve the health of visitors. 

Charlie, 9, says 'no' to sugary drinks.

Picture : Nicki Connolly
health

Donations of spit from about 1500 people are helping scientists understand how the billions of microbes in our mouths work to keep us healthy and what you can do to keep them healthy too

What makes eyes different colours?

Quest, Beauty Health and Fitness, Fresh Vision Optometrists
explainers

Do you have brown eyes? If that’s a yes, you’re in the majority. In fact, it’s thought that 10,000 years ago, every human had brown eyes. Kids News researched the science of eye colour

Coughing over the health of Australia’s piggy bank

Mark Knight's cartoon on Josh Frydenberg
civics

When Mark Knight tuned in to watch Treasurer Josh Frydenberg talk about the economy in federal parliament, he saw him coughing uncontrollably. What was the cause?

Coronavirus restrictions to ease across Australia

Parents pictured dropping off their kids to Milton State School, Brisbane 11th of May 2020.  Milton State School's first day back after Coronavirus (Covid-19) restrictions have been eased.   (AAP Image/Josh Woning)
news

A visit with grandma and grandpa, a return to school or a kick of the footy with friends? What do the easing of coronavirus lockdown rules mean for you?

Human urine could help make concrete on Moon

The full moon sets behind trees in the Taunus region near Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, May 7, 2020. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
space

Scientists have found that urea, the main chemical ingredient in urine, would make a good lunar concrete for building a Moon base, reducing the need to launch supplies from Earth

PM’s cabinet chat becomes a stop-work meeting

Mark Knight's National Cabinet cartoon
civics

In his weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight explores the PM’s National Cabinet meeting where one leader is pulling out all the stops to protect his citizens from coronavirus

Sea turtles thrive as humans stay off our beaches

ESCAPE:  Close-up of baby olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea), also known as the Pacific ridley, on beach sand. Selective focus on baby turtle. Picture: Istock
animals

Sea turtles are nesting in record numbers across the world as humans stay inside to stop the spread of COVID-19. The turtles are thriving with crowd-free beaches and less pollution

Kids get creative at school to keep COVID-19 away

Students in China go back to school wearing 1m wide hats. (Photos courtesy of Zhejiang Daily). Twitter: @SixthTone
health

Children in China are finally returning to classrooms after months of online learning, using creative thinking to find fun ways to keep their distance to help slow the spread of the coronavirus

Toy Story star surprises bullied Aussie boy

Tom Hanks arrives at the world premiere of Toy Story 3 on Sunday June 13, 2010 at The El Capitan Theater in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Katy Winn)
humanities

A Gold Coast boy named Corona has received a heartfelt letter and special gift from Hollywood actor Tom Hanks after revealing he had been bullied at school

Making music in times of trouble

Jamie Hanford, store manager at Mannys music store in Brisbane has said the shop is busier than they are at Christmas because go the Covid19 crisis. Pics Adam Head
arts

A Queensland music shop expected tough times during COVID-19 restrictions but it’s been “busier than Christmas” as people turn to playing musical instruments for pleasure and comfort

Drones delivering COVID-19 test kits

EXCLUSIVE NEWS360 PREMIUM LOCKED CONTENT
NO NEWS.COM, NO SKY, NO WEST AUS, NO AUS - Swoop Aero. Picture: Swoop Aero
technology

Aussies could soon be self-testing for COVID-19 with the help of a fleet of drones. A Melbourne-based drone company is already using tiny aircraft in Africa to deliver and return test kits

Home learning enough to make parents scream

Mark Knight cartoon on parents coping with home schooling.
arts

In his weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight explores how parents are coping — or not — with the need to support their children’s education from home

Rice ATM helps feed jobless during pandemic

A resident wearing a face mask fills a paperbag with free rice, amid Vietnam's nationwide social isolation effort as a preventive measure against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, in Hanoi on April 11, 2020. (Photo by Manan VATSYAYANA / AFP)
humanities

A businessman in Vietnam has invented a rice ATM to help people who can’t afford to buy food because of the shutdowns to prevent the spread of coronavirus

Wild beasts come out to play as humans stay in

LLANDUDNO, WALES - MARCH 31: Mountain goats roam the streets of LLandudno on March 31, 2020 in Llandudno, Wales. The goats normally live on the rocky Great Orme but are occasional visitors to the seaside town, but a local councillor told the BBC that the herd was drawn this time by the lack of people and tourists due to the COVID-19 outbreak and quarantine measures. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
animals

Wild animals including jaguars, goats and boars have started exploring quiet city streets across the world as humans stay inside during the coronavirus lockdown

Muggles invited free into Harry Potter world

* FOR HIT USE ONLY * NO ONLINE * Daniel Radcliffe stars as Harry Potter in film Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (C) 2011 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS (C) J.K.R. HARRY POTTER CHARACTERS, NAMES AND RELATED INDICIA ARE TRADEMARKS OF AND (C) WARNER BROS. ENT. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
just-for-fun

JK Rowling and Harry Potter are casting a spell to banish coronavirus boredom for children around the world after launching a free website for fans of the boy wizard

Breaking the rules is no laughing matter

mark knight toon for sunday herald sun march 29
arts

In his weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight explains why it’s impossible to laugh off the foolish behaviour of beachgoers who break social distancing rules

Outside gatherings cut to two to slow Covid-19

Sign Home, Door Key, Judges Or Auctioneer Gavel And Old Law Book On The Wood Table. Concept For Trial, Bankruptcy, Tax, Mortgage,  Auction Bidding, Foreclosure Or Inherit Real Estate
health

Sunday update: Prime Minister Scott Morrison has limited outside gatherings to just two people and  encouraged the elderly to not leave home  as the nation continues to try and slow the spread of the coronavirus

Leaders have different schools of thought

Mark Knight cartoon about covid-19 school closure confusion.
arts

In his weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight explains why he drew the Prime Minister and two state leaders as musicians playing to a different beat on schools closures

Big COVID-19 questions and simple answers

Coronavirus outbreak isolated on white and coronaviruses influenza background as dangerous flu strain cases as a pandemic medical health risk concept with disease cells as a 3D render.
explainers

Using World Health Organisation information, we answer important questions about COVID-19, such as: "What is a virus?"  and "Why are there new rules for everyday life?"

Aussie-made food on the menu for astronauts

Professor Volker Hessel with two strawberries, one freeze dried at the University of Adelaide, where their team is working on improving the taste of Astronaut food, Friday, March 20, 2020. Picture: MATT LOXTON
space

Australian scientists are cooking up astronaut food to send to space for a year before testing how tasty it is using an electronic nose and tongue in preparation for Moon and Mars missions

Shutdowns across Australia to slow Covid-19

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 22: People ignoring the closed beach directive from local authorities at Manly Beach on March 22, 2020 in Sydney, Australia. Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Friday introduced further measures to help stop the spread of COVID-19, implementing news rules limiting the number of people inside a venue to one every 4 square metres. Non-essential gatherings of 100 or more people indoors are banned, along with outdoor gatherings of more than 500 people in a bid to contain the spread of COVID-19. A travel ban on all visitors who are not Australian citizens or residents or their direct relations arriving into the country is now in place. There are now 1,286 confirmed cases of COVID-19 In Australia and the death toll now stands at 7. (Photo by James D. Morgan/Getty Images)
health

PM Scott Morrison has urged Australians to take social distancing seriously as he announced tough restrictions on how we live and closed non-essential businesses to slow the spread of coronavirus

Protect yourselves, we’re living in strange times

Mark Knight cartoon on the craziness at supermarkets during the coronavirus crisis
arts

In his weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight explains why he drew a cricketer protected by pads and a helmet heading off to buy toilet paper at the supermarket

AFL and NRL clubs vote to play on despite virus

Dustin Martin of the Tigers kicks the ball during an AFL Richmond Football Club training session at Punt Road Oval in Melbourne, Wednesday, March 18, 2020. (AAP Image/Michael Dodge) NO ARCHIVING
sport

AFL chief Gillon McLachlan has declared the footy season will kick off tomorrow night as NRL clubs also voted to play on during the coronavirus crisis

Hand washing: How does soap work?

Stuart Park Primary student Abigail Samuels 7 washing hands to beat Corona Virus .
Picture GLENN CAMPBELL
explainers

As people around the world work to slow the spread of the virus called COVID-19, everyone is telling us to wash our hands with soap. Kids News explains how soap works

It’s not all bad news; there is good news too

Two cheerful little girls running in their mother's hug.
humanities

Australian Childhood Foundation’s Dr Joe Tucci has a positive message for children about worry and bad news, and a reminder that there is still a lot of good news around if we look for it

Ban on indoor gatherings to limit spread of Covid-19

PERTH, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 13: Giant head cut-outs are seen placed in the empty seats behind the basket during the warmup period before game two of the NBL Grand Final series between the Perth Wildcats and the Sydney Kings at RAC Arena on March 13, 2020 in Perth, Australia. (Photo by Paul Kane/Getty Images)
health

For the first time in history, Australians are being told not to travel overseas and indoor gatherings of more than 100 people are banned in an effort to keep people safe from COVID-19

Miracle change after double hand transplant

Shreya Siddanagowder gestures during an interview with AFP at her home in Pune, more than two years after she had both hands transplanted
health

A woman who received two hands from a male donor has found her new hands have transformed to be slimmer and like her own skin tone, in an incredible development that has pleased doctors

WHO officially declares COVID-19 coronavirus a pandemic

A masked reveller walks on San Marco square in Venice on February 25, 2020, during the usual period of the Carnival festivities which have been cancelled following an outbreak of the COVID-19 novel coronavirus in northern Italy. - Italy's new coronavirus spread south on February 25 to Tuscany and Sicily, as the civil protection agency reported a surge in the number of infected people and Rome convened emergency talks. (Photo by ANDREA PATTARO / AFP)
health

As WHO officially declares the global coronavirus crisis a pandemic, PM Scott Morrison announces a $2.4 billion package for Australia’s health system to help it respond to the crisis

Toilet paper now worth its weight in gold

Mark Knight cartoon on the coronavirus and the "fishing line" jewellery robbery
arts

In his weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight explains how coronavirus fears across Australia have sparked panic buying and turned toilet paper into a rare gem

Would you eat butter made from maggots?

buttering toast with knife
environment

Scientists in Belgium are experimenting with larva fat to replace butter in waffles, cakes and cookies, saying using grease from insects is more sustainable than dairy produce

Violinist plays during her own brain surgery

CORRECTION - A still image take from handout video footage released by King’s College Hospital in London on February 19, 2020 and recorded on January 31, 2020, shows musician Dagmar Turner playing the violin during brain surgery at King's College Hospital in London. - A violinist helped surgeons avoid damage to her brain during surgery to remove a tumour by playing her instrument, the UK hospital where she underwent the innovative procedure said. Surgeons came up with the novel approach to ensure areas of Dagmar Turner's brain responsible for delicate hand movement were not affected during the precision procedure. Turner, a 53-year-old musician with the Isle of Wight Symphony Orchestra in southern England, was diagnosed in 2013 with a slow growing tumour after suffering a seizure during a concert. (Photo by - / KING'S COLLEGE HOSPITAL / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / KING'S COLLEGE HOSPITAL" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS / “The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by - has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [Dagmar instead of [Dogmar]. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require.”
health

A musician has played her violin during a six-hour, lifesaving operation to remove a brain tumour, helping calm the woman’s fears the surgery would ruin her ability to play

Why do we cry and what are tears?

drama concept - upset young blond woman crying with big tears expressing her disappointment and sadness, grey background studio
explainers

Crocodile tears are real – though humans are the only animals that cry emotional tears – and babies don’t cry tears at all. Kids News explains tears and crying

Doctors keep heart alive in jar for 24 hours

Heart and stethoscope isolated on white background concept for healthcare and diagnosis medical cardiac pulse test
health

Doctors have kept a heart beating for 24 hours in a jar with the new life-changing ULiSSES device, bringing hope to thousands of patients needing the lifesaving treatment

Mammoth funnel-web stuns zoo

Massive funnel-web spider at Australian Reptile Park.
animals

Look away if you hate spiders, because this story is about a huge funnel-web called Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. He’s so big he can produce enough venom to save many human lives

Keeping drinking water safe after fires

South Burnett Regional Council will be isolating the Wooroolin water supply for required maintenance today.
environment

Water experts are preparing to keep Australia’s drinking water clean after bushfires, including installing huge fabric curtains across Sydney’s main dam

WHO names coronavirus COVID-19

General photographs of passengers at Brisbane International Airport during Coronavirus outbreak, Monday, January 27, 2020 (AAP Image/Richard Walker)
health

The World Health Organisation now officially has a name for the coronavirus that has infected more than 40,000 people around the world