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Geography

Handout picture released by the Peruvian Ministry of Culture and taken on October 15, 2020 showing a giant cat figure etched into a slope at the Unesco world heritage site in the desert near the town of Nasca in southern Peru, after its was discovered by archaeologists and the area was cleaned as the geoglyph was barely visible and about to disappear due to erosion. - The geoglyph measures 37 metres from head to tail and forms part of the Nasca Lines — the hundreds of geoglyphs, including a hummingbird, a monkey and a pelican, carved into a coastal plain about 400 km south of Lima. According to a statement by the Peruvian ministry of culture, after cleaning the area the lines were found to measure between 30 and 40 cm in width. The Nazca Lines date back to between 500 BC and 500 AD, and cover an area of about 450 square km. They were given world heritage status in 1994. (Photo by - / Peruvian Ministry of Culture / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / PERU'S CULTURE MINISTRY" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

2000-year-old cat found carved in desert

history

A huge cat carving has been unearthed on a hillside in southern Peru and is thought to be a 2000-year-old Nazca Line. Around 1000 have already been discovered

Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners announced -  The embrace by Sergey Gorshkov, Russia
Winner 2020, Animals in their Environment, GRAND TITLE WINNER

With an expression of sheer ecstasy, a tigress hugs an ancient Manchurian fir, rubbing her cheek against bark to leave secretions from her scent glands. She is an Amur, or Siberian, tiger, here in the Land of the Leopard National Park, in the Russian Far East. The race – now regarded as the same subspecies as the Bengal tiger – is found only in this region, with a small number surviving over the border in China and possibly a few in North Korea. Hunted almost to extinction in the past century, the population is still threatened by poaching and logging, which also impacts their prey – mostly deer and wild boar, which are also hunted. But recent (unpublished) camera‑trap surveys indicate that greater protection may have resulted in a population of possibly 500–600 – an increase that it is hoped a future formal census may confirm. Low prey densities mean that tiger territories are huge. Sergey knew his chances were slim but was determined to take a picture of the totem animal of his Siberian homeland. Scouring the forest for signs, focusing on trees along regular routes where tigers might have left messages – scent, hairs, urine or scratch marks – he installed his first proper camera trap in January 2019, opposite this grand fir. But it was not until November that he achieved the picture he had planned for, of a magnificent tigress in her Siberian forest environment.  

Nikon Z-7 + 50mm f1.8 lens; 1/200 sec at f6.3; ISO 250; Cognisys camera-trap system.

Tree-hugging tiger photo wins wildlife award

animals

Judges called this photo of a Siberian tiger a “scene like no other” and declared it the overall winning entry in the Wildlife Photographer Of The Year competition. See all the winning photos

ESCAPE:  ALICE SPRINGS, 2 MARCH 2018 – Qantas’ newest Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, which features a unique Indigenous livery, touched down in Alice Springs today. Picture: Qantas 
Yam Deaming by Emily Kame Kngwarreye

All aboard Emily, the big jet to nowhere

geography

The Great Southern Land scenic flight is thought to be the fastest-selling flight in Qantas history, giving passengers a birds-eye view of Australia then delivering them back to where the flight began

Latest

Very rare ‘walking’ scorpion fish spotted on Reef

Scientists have viewed the deepest regions of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park
science

On an expedition by a robot to the depths of the Great Barrier Reef, scientists have found new species of black coral, sponges and a rare and awkward-looking “walking” scorpion fish

Scientists solve mystery of giant melting glacier

Thwaites glacier is said to be 'the most vulnerable place in Antarctica' Credit: AFP
environment

Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier — more than twice as big as Tasmania — is melting from below, putting it at risk of collapse. Scientists now know warm water flowing beneath it is to blame

Nature’s fury and beauty captured in winning photos

7PM, 27TH AUGUST 2020 EMBARGO FOR ONLINE, EMBARGO FOR PRINT 28TH AUGUST 2020, PREMIUM NETWORK CONTENT, NO AUSTRALIAN, NO NEWS.COM, NO SKY, NO WEST AUS, *ONLY FOR NEWS CORP MASTHEAD PAPERS*,  Overall Winner (originally Landscape) Ben Blanche.
A fire caused by a lightning strike in Mount Barney National Park.
It slowly marched over the peak as it moved around the border area of Queensland and New South Wales.
arts

A snap of a Black Summer bushfire has been named Australia’s best nature photograph in a competition that celebrates the country’s wild side

Brain holds key to Antarctic ice ship mystery

A strange 'ice ship' has been spotted on Google Earth by eagle-eyed conspiracy theorists Credit: YOUTUBE/MRMBBB333
explainers

Conspiracy theorists claim they’ve found a huge capsized ship about 160km off the coast of Antarctica but the mystery is most likely solved by looking at how human brains work

Female Aussie swimmer tops men’s world record

A handout picture taken on and released in London on August 16, 2020, shows Australian marathon swimmer Chloe McCardel reacting aboard her support boat, off the coast of Calais, northeast France,  after completing her 35th swim across the English Channel. - A Australian marathon swimmer on Sunday became the second woman to break the men's record for number of Channel crossings -- and avoided new UK quarantine rules on French arrivals on her return. Chloe McCardel, from Sydney, completed her 35th swim across the world's busiest shipping lane after emerging on the northern French shoreline in the early hours of Sunday. (Photo by Jason Kelvin / Newgate Comms / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT  " AFP PHOTO / HANDOUT /  Jason Kelvin via Newgate Comms"  -  NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS   -   DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  -  NO ARCHIVE
sport

Marathon swimmer Chloe McCardel has completed her 35th English Channel crossing — her fourth in 16 days and more than any man — battling fog, darkness, ships and quarantine rules

See the sights on a holiday to nowhere

ESCAPE: How I travel, Celeste Mitchell -  Italian ice - cream cone held in hand on the background of Piazza Navona in Rome , Italy  Picture: Istock
just for fun

Business is booming during coronavirus-related restrictions for a virtual travel company that helps you have a holiday without going anywhere

Volcano on Pacific Ring of Fire erupts

TOPSHOT - Mount Sinabung spews thick ash and smoke into the sky in Karo, North Sumatra on August 10, 2020. (Photo by Anto Sembiring / AFP)
geography

Indonesia’s Mount Sinabung has erupted, sending ash 5km into the sky. It’s the latest eruption along the 40,000km-long line of volcanoes, faults and trenches called the Pacific Ring of Fire

Penguin poop images from space reveal new Antarctic colonies

The smudges on the ice show the existence of an emperor penguin colony. Image taken from the European Commission’s Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite
animals

New satellite images of emperor penguin droppings have revealed a surprising number of colonies in Antarctica, where the flightless birds are under threat from global warming

Hole in dam wall saves epic eel journey

P1290288
environment

Eels in Tasmania can now swim through a hole drilled in a dam wall to help them begin their incredible 3000km migration north to breeding grounds in the Coral Sea around New Caledonia

Last 747 flying kangaroo in the sky

From Flight radar
The pilots on Australia's last QANTAS 747 (QF7474) to leave Australia decided to make the QANTAS logo via GPS on their way to the plane graveyard in LA.
history

After 50 years of service, the Qantas 747s — nicknamed the Queen of the Skies — are retiring and the last plane on its last flight traced the shape of a kangaroo in the sky

Calls to better protect world-famous giant cuttlefish site

Giant Australian Cuttlefish aggregation  off the coast of Whyalla in the Spencer Gulf  - picture Scott Portelli
animals

Pressure is mounting on the SA government to reverse a decision allowing fishing of giant cuttlefish in the Spencer Gulf, where they mass each year to spawn, the only place in the world this happens

Huge outback station to become national park

This undated handout from the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Services released on June 27, 2020 shows a grey grasswren at Narriearra Station, a 153,415-hectare (379,000 acres) property in Australia's far northwest New South Wales. - A slice of Australian outback almost the size of greater London will be turned into a national park to help protect threatened species after authorities bought the land on June 27, 2020. (Photo by Jeff HARDY / NSW NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICES / AFP) / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NSW NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICES/JEFF HARDY " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  - NO ARCHIVE
environment

The NSW government has bought more than 1500 square kilometres of the state for a new national park to protect 25 threatened animal species and important habitat

Why don’t you sink in the Dead Sea?

ESCAPE:  Woman with sun hat holding and reading a newspaper while lying on back with crossed feet, floating in salty water of Dead Sea, Israel, Middle East.  Picture: Istock
explainers

Ask people what they know about the Dead Sea and most will tell you that it’s impossible to sink when you’re swimming in it, but not everyone knows why. Kids News did some research

Scientists map ancient lost continent

A handout photo released by Nature shows an artist's impression of life restoration of the Savannasaurus elliottorum based on the type specimen (“Wade”) and comparisons with titanosaurs from around the world.  Scientists unveiled on October 20, 2016 fossils from a new species of giant, long-necked dinosaur discovered in northeastern Australia, speculating that it may have traversed Antarctica from South America some 105 million years ago.   / AFP PHOTO / NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP / Travis TISCHLER / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NATURE / Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History TRAVIS TISCHLER" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
geography

Towering titanosaurs and other dinosaurs once roamed the vast, mountainless lands between the east of Australia and New Zealand on a lost continent called Zealandia

Climbers to remeasure height of Everest

In this May 16, 2020 aerial photo released by Xinhua News Agency, Chinese surveyors hike toward a higher spot from the base camp on Mount Qomolangma at an altitude of 5,200 meters. The Chinese government-backed team plans to summit Mount Everest this week at a time when the world's tallest peak has been closed to commercial climbers. (Jigme Dorje/Xinhua via AP)
geography

A team of climbers is on its way to summit Mount Everest this week to measure whether it has grown as Earth’s tectonic plates move and try to end international disagreement on the subject

Cave find rewrites history of early humans

Primeval Caveman Wearing Animal Skin Holds Stone Tipped Spear Looks Around, Explores Prehistoric Forest in a Hunt for Animal Prey. Neanderthal Going Hunting in the Jungle
history

Scientists have found human bones and a tooth up to 46,000 years old that rewrite the history of early humans’ arrival in Europe and time spent living alongside Neanderthals

Football-sized chunk of the Moon for sale

A piece of Moon rock
space

One of the largest Moon rocks on Earth is up for sale, probably chipped off the surface of the Moon by a collision with an asteroid or comet and then plunging down in the Sahara Desert

‘Crazy beast’ prehistoric mammal found

The Adalatherium was a bizarre creature that lived around 66 million
 years ago on the island of Madagascar. Picture: Facebook/Denver Museum of
 Nature & Science
animals

The skeleton of a backward-toothed mammal nicknamed “crazy beast” that existed alongside dinosaurs 66 million years ago has been unveiled by Australian palaeontologists

Found! Antarctic frog fossils from warmer times

Dr Jodi Rowley with James Alcock
animals

Experts have discovered cold-blooded frogs once lived on a warm Antarctica 40 million years ago PLUS Australian scientists need your help for a frog-finding mission closer to home

Exploring the 250th anniversary of Cook’s arrival

this
 ESCAPE HAWAII PHILIP HEADS STORY
 Sailing ship HM Bark Endeavour replica of the HMS Endeavour which carried Captain James Cook on his South Pacific expedition at anchor in Kealakekua Bay, Hawaii, USA 30 Oct 1999. 
 /Sailing/ships Picture: Ap
history

Wednesday, April 29, 2020 marks the 250th anniversary of James Cook’s arrival at Botany Bay. We explore why Cook came to Australia and why some celebrate and some lament this day

Earthquakes signal Iceland’s volcanoes waking up

TOPSHOT - A picture taken on April 2, 2020, shows molten lava spraying during an eruption of the Piton de le Fournaise volcano, on the French Indian Ocean island of La Reunion. (Photo by Richard BOUHET / AFP)
science

Scientists warn that a volcanic area of Iceland is becoming active, with more than 8000 earthquakes recorded since January 21 and 10cm of land uplift as magma pushes up from below

Take a virtual tour around the world

Walk the Great Wall of China without moving a muscle. PHOTO: Istock
technology

Visit the Great Wall of China, see the Mona Lisa or watch zoo animals without leaving home. Here are 10 top virtual experiences plus one very special out-of-this-world tour

Exploring the lost city of Pompeii

ESCAPE: DOC HOLIDAY May 29  ..  Apollo statue in Pompeii, Italy (apollo temple). Picture: Supplied
history

On April 1, 1748, a Spanish engineer rediscovered Pompeii, changing the way we thought about historical artefacts and beginning the longest archaeological dig in the world

What and where is the equator?

Picture supplied by Joel Selwood.   Joel Selwood and his dad at the Equator
explainers

Parachutists have set a world record for crossing the equator 12 times in a single jump, which got us wondering what the equator is, where it is and why do they launch space rockets there?

Aussie treasures stored in global code bank

The film reels are sorted by country. Picture: supplied
technology

The scientific knowledge about Australia’s plants and animals and the contents of our national library are among the digital treasures being kept 250m underground in Norway

World’s wonderful wildlife on show

*EMBARGO - FOR MONDAY PAPERS, 9 MARCH, 2020* 
GROUP RIGHTS, ONE TIME USE
 MUST CREDIT Marcus Westberg/2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Image Name: Spread'em

Photographer Name: Marcus Westberg

Year: 2020

Image Description: I had spent several days in a hide in Onguma Private Reserve, near Etosha, Namibia, initially hoping to see elephants or big cats, but enjoying all the visitors that came to the waterhole nearby. I knew if I was patient enough I would have a good chance of photographing giraffes as they came in to drink, but I never imagined any of them would squeeze in between the hide and the waterhole! This presented me with a different perspective than I had envisioned. Patience, and a willingness to sit quietly in nature is often reward in itself - although in this case I was delighted to leave with an image like this. 

Copyright: © Marcus Westberg, Sweden, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards
arts

Photos of a giraffe’s bottom, a monkey deep in thought, a hunting eagle and a kookaburra surveying burned forest have each taken out prizes in the Sony World Photography Awards 2020

Farewell Aurora Australis, our beloved Antarctic ship

Emperor penguins  on the pack ice in the foreground with the Aurora Australis parked in ice in the background in 2008 . Please Credit - Mike Zupanc/Australian Antarctic Division
science

The Australian Antarctic Division’s famous bright orange research ship Aurora Australis departed for Macquarie Island this week on one last voyage before its retirement

WHO officially declares COVID-19 coronavirus a pandemic

A masked reveller walks on San Marco square in Venice on February 25, 2020, during the usual period of the Carnival festivities which have been cancelled following an outbreak of the COVID-19 novel coronavirus in northern Italy. - Italy's new coronavirus spread south on February 25 to Tuscany and Sicily, as the civil protection agency reported a surge in the number of infected people and Rome convened emergency talks. (Photo by ANDREA PATTARO / AFP)
health

As WHO officially declares the global coronavirus crisis a pandemic, PM Scott Morrison announces a $2.4 billion package for Australia’s health system to help it respond to the crisis

Has Yoshi the turtle swum home to Australia?

Yoshi the turtle when she was still in the aquarium. Picture: Two Oceans Aquarium
animals

An endangered turtle has reached WA after a two-year, 37,000km swim, possibly the longest animal journey recorded by a satellite tag, which has scientists wondering if she was born here

Life on remote Goudier Island, Antarctica

British Base and Post Office, Port Lockroy, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, Polar Regions
geography

As a post office worker at Port Lockroy, one of the main tasks is cleaning up penguin poo, the toilet is a bucket with a lid and though you get one day off every 14, there’s nowhere to go

Bird’s-eye view of our beautiful planet Earth

Google Earth satellite images from space
geography

Google has added 1000 new images to Earth View – a collection of the most beautiful landscapes from Google Earth. And a farmer’s marriage proposal makes it onto Google Maps

Children race llamas to save World Heritage park

A child sits on a llama before racing it in Los Llanganates, National Park, Ecuador, Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020. Wooly llamas, an animal emblematic of the Andean mountains in South America, become the star for a day each year when Ecuadoreans dress up their prized animals for children to ride them in 500-meter races. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
environment

Risking injury and braving the cold, children as young as four race llamas across a high-altitude region of Ecuador each year to help save one of the most important wetlands on Earth

NASA animation shows Earth without oceans

The NASA animation simulates would the Earth would look like if the oceans dried up. Picture: NASA
geography

Travel back in time thousands of years through this NASA animation to look at Earth without oceans, when vast lands allowed ancient people to roam the world

Tourists rescued as island volcano erupts

White Island Volcano in New Zealand has erupted today.
Early reports are suggesting upwards of 20 people were on the Island when it erupted.
geography

New Zealand’s White Island volcano has erupted suddenly forcing the dramatic rescue of tourists who were exploring the crater floor when it began to rumble

First Aussie reaches heart of Antarctica

** SPEAK TO COURIER MAIL PIC DESK *** ICEMAN: Gold Coast vet and adventurer Geoff Wilson who is going into a deep freezer to test his gear in preparation for a solo crossing of Antarctica to raise funds for the McGrath Foundation.
Picture: NIGEL HALLETT
humanities

An adventurer from Queensland has become the first Australian to reach Antarctica’s Pole of Inaccessibility, just one leg of an epic journey to help men and women experiencing breast cancer

World map of most common last names

The world map of names
geography

A fascinating new map has plotted out the most common surnames in every country in the world. Can you guess the most common last name in Australia?

15 amazing sculptures around the world

Mother Nature, Canada. Picure: Alamy
arts

Earth is so big and so filled with things to see it’s hard to know where to start looking. To help you out, we’ve compiled this collection of incredible sculptures to look at and learn about

Record floods swamp historic Venice

TOPSHOT - A woman  crosses the flooded St. Mark's squareby St. Mark's Basilica after an exceptional overnight "Alta Acqua" high tide water level, early on November 13, 2019 in Venice. - Powerful rainstorms hit Italy on November 12, with the worst affected areas in the south and Venice, where there was widespread flooding. Within a cyclone that threatens the country, exceptional high water were rising in Venice, with the sirocco winds blowing northwards from the Adriatic sea against the lagoon’s outlets and preventing the water from flowing back into the sea. At 22:40pm the tide reached 183 cm, the second measure in history after the 198 cm of the 1966 flood. (Photo by Marco Bertorello / AFP)
weather

UNESCO World Heritage Site Venice is in a state of emergency after “apocalyptic” floods swept through the historic Italian city, with the mayor blaming climate change

Weary firefighters hailed as heroes

Firefighters work to contain a bushfire along Old Bar road in Old Bar, NSW, Saturday, November 9, 2019. Two people have been killed and seven others are missing in bushfires in NSW which have also destroyed at least 100 homes. (AAP Image/Darren Pateman) NO ARCHIVING
humanities

As several states prepare for increasing fire danger in coming days, we look at the incredible efforts of firefighters on the ground day and night 

Alive! Creature thought extinct found

A silver-backed chevrotain. Picture: Global Wildlife Conservation
animals

A tiny, deer-like creature that “seemingly only existed as part of our imagination” has been found in a forest almost 30 years after the last official sighting

Australia’s most incredible weather photos

Australian Weather Calendar 2020
weather

Rainbows, aurora australis and massive, fluffy clouds that make you want to bounce on them star in the year’s best weather photos, as judged by the Bureau of Meteorology

Mountaineer smashes world record by seven years

TOPSHOT - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NIRMAL 'NIMS' PURJA (BREMONT PROJECT POSSIBLE) This handout photo taken on May 22, 2019 and released by Nepali climber Nirmal 'Nims' Purja and his "Bremont Project Possible" team shows Purja standing at the summit of Mount Everest. - A Nepali mountaineer on October 29 smashed the speed record for summiting the world's 14 highest peaks, racing up all "8000ers" in just six months and six days, organisers said. (Photo by Handout / Nirmal 'Nims' Purja - Bremont Project Possible / AFP) / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NIRMAL 'NIMS' PURJA (BREMONT PROJECT POSSIBLE)" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  - NO ARCHIVES
humanities

A Nepalese mountaineer has climbed the world’s 14 highest peaks in just 189 days, his incredible feat smashing the previous record by more than seven years

Footy-shaped subs to swarm the seas

A supplied image obtained on Tuesday, October 29, 2019, shows Co-founders of UAM Tec, Ben Fleming (Managing Director) and Shawn Taylor (CEO) beside their Sub Mapping submarine. UAM Tec's Sub Mapping technology is the first fully autonomous and visual-based mapping submarine to exist in the world. (AAP Image/UAM Tec) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
geography

An Australian company is preparing to send a swarm of footy-shaped, mini-submarines into the world’s oceans, lakes and waterways to create an underwater version of Google Street View

Found: exact location of first humans’ home

Human evolution on the cliff with blue, map of earth, background. Human evolution of man / people, from monkey to modern man, going towards the end of the cliff. Ending an era or it can be as risk to end a business project / company. Behind is the map of the world with clouds.
geography

An Australian-led team of scientists has identified the exact place in northern Botswana that was the home of the earliest ancestors of everyone alive today

Small town strikes it lucky in big dry

Holding a water rubber hose tube. Watering
weather

Tenterfield — battling drought and, recently, bushfires — has struck it lucky with the discovery of underground water only 126 days before the town’s supply was due to run dry

The most amazing wildlife photos of the year

Yongqing Bao won the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 title for this image taken in the Chinese province of Qinghai. Called The Moment, it pictures a standoff between a Tibetan fox and a marmot, which seems frozen in fear. Chair of the judging panel, Roz Kidman Cox, says, 'Photographically, it is quite simply the perfect moment. The expressive intensity of the postures holds you transfixed, and the thread of energy between the raised paws seems to hold the protagonists in perfect balance' MUST CREDIT Photographers name/ Wildlife Photographer of the Year
animals

A gripping action shot that captures “the perfect moment” between a Tibetan fox and a marmot has won its photographer the title of Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Where have all the Bogong moths gone?

These Pygmy Possums need names! Picture- Nicole Cleary
animals

Critically endangered mountain pygmy-possums need your help to solve the mystery of the missing Bogong moths that have disappeared somewhere between Queensland and Victoria

World’s biggest war memorial turns 100

Great Ocean Road
Photo courtesy Visit Victoria
geography

It’s 100 years this week since returned World War I soldiers starting chipping away at the cliffs with picks and shovels to create Australia’s incredible Great Ocean Road

Shock find: superpowered Amazon eel

This undated photo provided by researchers in September 2019 shows an Electrophorus voltai, one of the two newly discovered electric eel species, in Brazil's Xingu River. While 250 species of fish in South America generate electricity, only electric eels use it to stun prey and for self-protection. (Leandro Sousa via AP)
animals

For more than 250 years, we thought there was only one species of electric eel on Earth. Scientists have discovered two more species, one of which can shock its prey with 860 volts

Welcome to the valley of the scarecrow dolls

Life-size dolls looking on from a bus stop in the tiny village of Nagoro in western Japan. Photo: AFP
humanities

The streets of Nagoro appear busy, dotted with people going about day-to-day life at school, at shops and in gardens. But they’re not people, they’re life-size dolls

Indonesia to relocate capital city from Jakarta

Local residents play on the shore in front of a mosque that has been claimed by the sea beside the protective seawall barrier at Muara Baru, North Jakarta. Picture: Graham Crouch
geography

President Joko Widodo has announced plans to move Indonesia’s capital city from overcrowded, sinking and polluted Jakarta to Borneo island, known for rainforests and orang-utans

Amazon fires: Who will help save the rainforest?

TOPSHOT - A protester  holds a placard  in front of the Brazilan Embassy during a demonstration organised by Extinction Rebellion activists in Brussels, August 26, 2019, calling on Brazil to act to protect the Amazon rainforest from deforestation and fire. - The Amazon rainforest has seen a record number of wildfires this year, which have triggered a global outcry. (Photo by Kenzo TRIBOUILLARD / AFP)
environment

Some world leaders have agreed to help fight fires in the Amazon and try to repair the damage once the fires are out. We look at why the so-called ‘lungs of the world’ is so important

Huge volcanic island floating towards Australia

Australian couple Michael Hoult and Larissa Brill sailed into the pumice raft by accident on their way to Fiji Credit: SAIL SURF ROAM/FACEBOOK
science

A city-sized, floating island spewed from an undersea volcano is heading for Australia’s coast. Rather than causing a disastrous collision, its arrival could help heal the Great Barrier Reef

Move to add giraffes to endangered list

Giraffes in Kruger park South Africa. Picture: iStock

Doc Holiday, Escape
animals

World nations have called for giraffes to be added to the endangered species list as numbers in the wild continue to drop because of loss of habitat, drought and hunting

Iceland’s funeral for its melted glacier

TOPSHOT - An Icelandic girl poses for a photo with a "Pull the emergency brake" sign near to where a monument was unveiled at the site of Okjokull, Iceland's first glacier lost to climate change in the west of Iceland on August 18, 2019. (Photo by Jeremie RICHARD / AFP)
environment

With poetry, moments of silence and political speeches about the urgent need to fight climate change, Iceland bade goodbye to its first extinct glacier

100 years since Qantas was born on a long drive

George Gorham, Paul McGinness and Hudson Fysh before departing Longreach on their air service survey of northern Australia on August 19, 1919. Picture: suppied
history

Bouncing across northern Australia in a Model T Ford on rough tracks made for wagons led these WWI pilots to dream of setting up the outback airline we know as Qantas

Volcano discovery named after Shane Warne

FILE - In this July 14, 2018 photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava from Kilauea volcano erupts in the Leilani Estates neighborhood near Pahoa, Hawaii. Scientists have downgraded the alert level for Hawaii's Kilauea volcano in response to reduced activity, saying the next eruption is likely a few years away. The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory announced Tuesday, March 26, 2019, that the alert level for the Big Island volcano has been lowered from "advisory" to "normal," the Hawaii Tribune-Herald reported. (U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
science

Around 100 volcanoes have been discovered in Central Australia and named the “Warnie Volcanic Province” after the Australian cricketer widely considered the greatest spin bowler of all time

Counting penguins and trying not to get blown away

SUNTAS:August 3, 2019.
Andrea Turbett, DPIPWE ranger works on Macquarie Island. Pic ONE TIME USE ONLY, by Jason Edwards.
geography

The wind is ferocious and the temperature hovers close to zero, but Andrea Turbett has only warm words to describe her job on the remote, sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island as Australia's southernmost ranger

Man who found Titanic is out to find Earhart

American aviation pioneer and author Amelia Earhart was born on this day in 1898. Earhart was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences, and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organisation for female pilots.
history

The deep-sea explorer who discovered the Titanic and many other shipwrecks is on a quest to solve the 80-year-old mystery of pioneering pilot Amelia Earhart’s disappearance

500-year-old ‘pristine’ shipwreck found

The ship, which dates back to the time of da Vinci and Columbus is so well preserved its masts and hull are intact. Picture: Deep Sea Productions/MMTSource:Supplied
history

A ship from the time Leonardo da Vinci painted the Mona Lisa and Christopher Columbus discovered America has been found on the bottom of the sea looking “almost like it sank yesterday”

Plant a trillion trees to pause climate change

National Tree Day
environment

On the eve of National Tree Day, new research suggests planting a trillion trees could achieve a 20-year pause in global warming and that we have the available land to do it

Fighting extinction with world’s longest cat fence

Mala or rufous hare-wallaby at Scotia Wildlife Sanctuary, habitat of endemic and endangered wildlife managed for conservation by the Australian Wildlife Conservancy, in Southwestern New South Wales, Australia.


Picture: Australian Wildlife Conservancy
environment

Thirty endangered rufous hare-wallabies have been released in Australia’s Central Desert into a sanctuary created as part of a project building the world’s longest cat-proof fence

Photos of the world at work in 2019

Workers sort chillies in Bangladesh
humanities

We look at some of the best contributions to an international photography competition about how we work now and wonder which of these jobs will still be done by humans in 2100

Message in a bottle found after 50 years

message in a bottle floating on water
history

In 1969 a boy dropped a message in a bottle into the ocean from a ship off the Australian coast and now another boy has found the bottle and the message’s author has been located

Freak summer hailstorm buries city in ice

After hot days, the icy storm provided a few hours of fun. Picture: AFP
weather

After several warm days with temperatures above 30C, residents of this Mexican city woke up to a winter wonderland and then set about trying to find their cars under all that ice

Volcanic eruptions spew ash into stratosphere

This handout image obtained courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory taken on June 22, 2019, shows Raikoke volcano erupting in the Kuril Islands in Russia's Sakhalin Oblast region, near the Kamchatka Peninsula. - Unlike some of its perpetually active neighbors on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Raikoke Volcano on the Kuril Islands rarely erupts. The small, oval-shaped island most recently exploded in 1924 and in 1778. The dormant period ended around 4:00 a.m. local time on June 22, 2019, when a vast plume of ash and volcanic gases shot up from its 700-meter-wide crater. (Photo by Joshua Stevens / NASA Earth Observatory / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / JOSHUA STEVENS /  NASA EARTH OBSERVATORY " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS ---
science

An erupting volcano in Papua New Guinea has blanketed a town in ash and forced evacuations, just four days after astronauts on the ISS photographed another incredible eruption

Explorers find lost city full of natural treasures

They also stumbled upon pale-faced bats that haven't been seen in Honduras for 75 years. Picture: Trond Larsen
science

Scientists dropped by helicopter into a remote lost city in a rainforest have found an incredible treasure trove of rare and endangered species, some thought to be extinct

Massive Indonesian earthquake rocks Darwin

Seismograph with paper in action and earthquake - 3D Rendering
science

A 7.2-magnitude Indonesian earthquake — the largest in a decade — has rocked Darwin and forced residents to flee office buildings and hospitals

Girl, 10, youngest ever to climb El Capitan

In this June 10, 2019, photo, provided by Michael Schneiter, is Selah Schneiter during her climb up El Capitan in Yosemite National Park, Calif. A 10-year-old Colorado girl has scaled Yosemite National Park's El Capitan, taking five days to reach the top of the iconic rock formation. Selah Schneiter of Glenwood Springs completed the challenging 3,000-foot (910 meters) climb last week with the help of her father and a family friend. (Michael Schneiter via AP)
sport

Over five days, including nights sleeping in a tent slung from the rock face, a 10-year-old girl has become the youngest person to climb the world’s most famous rock wall

Melting ice leaves sled dogs walking on water

A June 13, 2019 image photographed by Steffen Olsen of the Centre for Ocean and Ice at the Danish Meteoroligical Institute shows sled dogs wading through standing water on the sea ice during an expedition in North Western Greenland. - The ice in the area forms pretty reliably every winter and is very thick which means that there are relatively few fractures for meltwater to drain through. Last week saw the onset of very warm conditions in Greenland" wrote the Danish Meteorological Institue in a email and Olsen tweeted  that his team relied on traditional knowledge from local hunters and their dogs as they searched for dry spots on the ice. The team also used satellite images to plan their trip. He said the photos documented an “unusual day” and that the image was “more symbolic than scientific to many”. (Photo by Steffen Olsen / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / SOURCE / BYLINE" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
weather

A photo of a pack of sled dogs appearing to walk on water in Greenland has shocked the world, showing the result of a massive ice melt on an unusually warm day last week

The islanders who want to officially scrap time

The island of Sommaroy has days where the sun doesn't set
geography

Residents of an island near the Arctic Circle are working on a plan to officially ignore time for two months each summer when the sun doesn’t set for 69 days and it doesn’t get dark at all

Solomon touches down after world-record flight

Solomon Cameron beside his aeroplane
humanities

An Australian teenage pilot has set a world record for the youngest solo circumnavigation of the country, touching down back in Bendigo after seven weeks and 15,000km

NASA welcomes holiday-makers to space

(FILES) This handout file photo taken on February 23, 2017 and received from the European Space Agency (ESA)/ North American Space Agency (NASA) shows French Austronaut Thomas Pesquet juggling and eating "Macarons" which were specially modified for consumption in space by French master pastry chef Pierre Herme, aboard the International Space Station,      Pesquet will come back to Earth on June 2, 2017 after spending six months in space.  / AFP PHOTO / ESA/NASA / HO / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / European Space Agency (ESA)/ North American Space Agency (NASA)" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

The International Space Station is about to become the latest holiday destination with the first tourists blasting off next year. A ticket will cost about $83 million, air included

‘Ice pirate’ plots to ‘steal’ a massive iceberg

Beautiful blue icebergs in Antarctic Sea. 


 Picture: iStock

Antarctica, Sarah nicholson, Escape
environment

A cold, bold plan to tow a 113 million-tonne iceberg from Antarctica to South Africa for drinking water is all set to go ahead within months

Record-breaking odyssey to every country

American woman Lexie Alford, 21, has  become youngest person to visit every country in the world. In Sri Lanka, 2019. Source - https://www.instagram.com/lexielimitless/?utm_source=ig_embed
geography

A 21-year-old woman has smashed a world record and achieved an unbelievable feat by being the youngest person to visit every country on Earth

Ancient coins that could rewrite Australian history

Darwin historian Mike Owen holds up a coin he believes is from Kilwa at his home in Rapid Creek, wednesday, May 15, 2019. Mike Hermes revealed he found an ancient coin lying on a beach on the Wessel Islands last year he believes to be from Kilwa, more than 10,000km away in what is now known as Tanzania, dating from before the 15th century. Picture: Keri Megelus
money

Tiny copper coins up to 1000 years old found on a remote beach on an Australian island could add a new chapter to the story of our European history

Diver breaks record with deepest submarine trip

In among the prawn-like creatures, diver Victor Vescovo also found pollution. Picture: Discovery Channel/Deep PlanetSource:Supplied
geography

Piles of lolly wrappers and other human-made rubbish marred the excitement of a record-breaking dive in a submarine to the bottom of the world’s deepest ocean

Man crosses ocean in orange wooden barrel

TOPSHOT - Frenchman Jean-Jacques Savin, who floated across the Atlantic in a custom-made barrel for nearly 100 days, stands next to his barrel aboard the ship "Friendship" after being brought back to land in Fort-de-France, on the French Caribbean island of Martinique, on May 9, 2019. - Savin, 72, a former French paratrooper and avid triathlete embarked on his solo trans-Atlantic test on December 26 from the Canary islands just west of Africa, aiming to reach the Caribbean in about three months just by drifting in ocean currents. (Photo by Lionel CHAMOISEAU / AFP)
humanities

A 72-year-old explorer has floated for 127 days and more than 4000km across the Atlantic Ocean in a plywood capsule without a sail or a motor

What causes hail and is it dangerous?

MUST CREDIT: Sandy Robinson Cricket ball-sized hail fell at Athol, near Toowoomba, this afternoon about 2.38pm. The storm lasted about 20-30 minutes.
explainers

After a freak hailstorm turned a sandy beach into a sea of white, we look at what causes hail and if it’s dangerous for humans to get caught in it

Cheeseslaw officially a word after almost 100 years

Cheese with grater and grated cheese. 19 Jun 2000. / food / dairy - archived
humanities

Broken Hill is usually in the news for being hot and dry, but this time it’s about something cool and damp: a special local salad invention called cheeseslaw

Kids News explainer: What is drought?

Dust storm in Junee NSW 5th of March 2019 Must credit @thepastyfarmer permission for use given. from source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BunkgrGA3bZ/
explainers

May is likely to be drier than average for most of eastern Australia, which is bad news for the large parts of the country in drought

Antarctica’s emperor penguins go missing

Emperor Penguins in Antarctica
animals

Scientists thought Antarctica’s Halley Bay would be a refuge from global warming for emperor penguins, but many breeding pairs are already missing

Taking selfies with endangered mountain gorillas

This selfie received thousands of likes with many thanking the rangers for protecting the animals. Picture: FacebookSource:Supplied
animals

Anti-poaching rangers have shared a series of incredible and heartwarming snaps posing and relaxing with the magnificent gorillas they risk their lives to protect

Australia’s rebel time zone

Ford LPG Challenge - Around Australia for Around $1000 (Adelaide to Perth leg. Day 3 Cocklebiddy to Kalgoolie. Wester Time Zone road sign along the Nullabor Plain 05 Aug 2006. road sign
mathematics

Look at the clocks in the roadhouses along a remote, 340km section of the highway through the Nullarbor and you’ll see they don’t match anyone’s smartphone time

Daylight saving on way out

Daylight Saving, turning the clock back an hour. Picture: Tony Gough
mathematics

As Australians in four states grope around in the darkness of the last daylight saving mornings of the season, Europe has voted to cancel this clock-changing practice

World’s richest prize for teacher of the poor

This handout picture provided on March 24, 2019 by the Global Education and Skills Forum, an initiative of the Varkey Foundation, shows Kenyan teacher Peter Tabichi (C) holding up the Global Teacher Prize (GTP) trophy after winning the US$ 1 million award during an official ceremony in Dubai presented by Australian actor Hugh Jackman (C-L) and attended by the Dubai Crown Prince Hamdan bin Mohammed Al-Maktoum (C-R). - Tabichi, a 36-year-old maths and physics teacher at Keriko Secondary School in the village of Pwani, in Kenya's Nakuru county, was named as winner of the "largest prize of its kind", set up by the Varkey Foundation to "recognize one exceptional teacher who has made an outstanding contribution to the profession." (Photo by - / Global Education and Skills Forum / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / GLOBAL EDUCATION AND SKILLS FORUM" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
humanities

There is only one computer, bad internet access, no library, no science laboratory and drought and famine are frequent, yet Peter Tabichi’s students are achieving great things

‘Stay indoors’ warning as cyclone hits WA

Currently two cyclones are impacting Australia's north. Picture: Earthschool.
weather

Residents are being warned to "stay indoors" as the extremely dangerous tropical Cyclone Veronica brings wild winds and heavy rain in Western Australia today

Lipstick-pink lake a hit for selfies

Pink Lake - Westgate Park. The pink lake at Westgate Park has become one of the most selfied and Instagrammed places in Victoria. (L-R) Alex, Sheehan, Abner and Chloe take a selfie. Picture: Jake Nowakowski
environment

People who love pink are flocking like flamingoes to take selfies in front of a lake in Melbourne dyed by a population explosion of algae

Big fish catches fishermen by surprise

Hunter and Steven Jones with a Sunfish found on the Coorong over the weekend. Picture: Jacob Jones
animals

A group of friends thought they saw a massive rock on the sand, but we now know it was an ocean sunfish, one of the world’s biggest fish and very rare in these waters

Australians may be 120,000 years old

UNDATED : Copy of early undated image of central Australian aboriginals, similar to those who masterminded or were victims of strange ritual killings known as "kadaitcha. Aborigines
history

Scientists have discovered humans may have been living in Australia for 120,000 years. If proven right, the discovery could rewrite the indigenous history of our nation

Three disco-dancing peacock spiders found

Maratus aquilus. Picture: Joseph SchubertSource:Twitter
animals

An Australian citizen scientist has discovered three beautiful new species of disco-dancing peacock spiders. Arachnophobes needn’t worry: they’re the size of a grain of rice

Researchers find dingoes are not dogs

HOLD SEE SUNDAY MAIL BRISBANE PIC DESK 12 week old Dingo Puppy Nala has just arrived at Wildlife HQ on the Sunshine Coast and has keepers and dingoes both wrapped around her little paws. Photo Lachie Millard
animals

Researchers from several Australian universities have determined the dingo is not a dog but a unique native species of its own

Solomon Islands battling oil spill

TOPSHOT - This undated handout provided by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) of Australia on March 1, 2019 shows the oil spill from the MV Solomon Trader along the coastline of Rennell Island, some 240 kilometres south of the capital Honiara. - New Zealand joined an international effort on March 1 to limit damage from oil spilling out of the ship that ran aground near World Heritage-listed waters in the Solomon Islands almost a month ago. (Photo by Handout / DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
environment

A major oil spill in the Solomon Islands is moving towards the nearby UNESCO World Heritage Area, with fears of a looming environmental disaster

Ancient tattoo kit made from human bone

Geoffrey Clark with one of the pieces of bone that is an ancient tattoo tool. Picture: ANU
history

Researchers have uncovered the world’s oldest known tattoo kit, some of which is made from human bone and believed to be 2700 years old

Potion to live forever found in Chinese tomb

Chinese alchemists brewed elixirs of immortality until the 18th Century
history

A mysterious potion discovered in an ancient Han Dynasty tomb in China was brewed to allow whoever drank it to live forever. Unfortunately, it is full of toxic ingredients

Scientists find giant bee thought to be extinct

TOPSHOT - This undated handout photomontage provided by Global Wildlife Conservation on February 21, 2019, shows a living Wallace’s giant bee (Megachile pluto) (R), which is approximately four times larger than a European honeybee, after it was rediscovered in the Indonesian islands of the North Moluccas. - The world's largest bee -- roughly the size of a human thumb -- has been rediscovered in a remote part of Indonesia in its first sighting in nearly 40 years, researchers said on February 21, 2019. Despite its conspicuous size, no one had observed Wallace's giant bee -- discovered in the 19th century by British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace and nicknamed the "flying bulldog" -- in the wild since 1981, the Global Wildlife Conservation said. (Photo by CLAY BOLT / Global Wildlife Conservation / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / GLOBAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION / CLAY BOLT" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - NO ARCHIVES
animals

Scientists have rediscovered a giant bee, nicknamed the ‘flying bulldog’, on a remote Indonesian island after thinking it had been extinct for 30 years

Aussie’s record 5000km ocean row

A supplied image obtained on Wednesday, February 20, 2019, of Sydney woman Michelle Lee who has become the first Australian woman to cross an ocean solo in a rowboat after rowing across the Atlantic Ocean in 68 days. (AAP Image/Supplied, Robin Skjoldborg) NO ARCHIVING
sport

Michelle Lee has become the first Australian woman to row across an ocean after a 5000km solo journey across the Atlantic that took 68 days, 12 hours and 49 minutes