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Geography

A 1920 George V Sovereign minted in Sydney that sold at a Monaco online auction on Saturday.

Rare Aussie coins set world record price

money

Two rare Australian coins leave loose change behind, fetching around $1.5 million each at a Monaco online auction

Westminster School Year 7 students Ashwin and Axel guide one of their prototype Sphero Bolt Driven Water Collection Devices watched by Anna and Aijay in the schools pool Thursday ,June,3,2021.Picture Mark Brake

Students test sea rubbish removal with robots

environment

Year 7 students in SA have begun testing robotic rubbish collectors in the school pool, with their sights set on one day cleaning up waste-filled water worldwide

Longford Spiderweb Ballooning after flooding in the area. Picture: Lotje McDonald Photography (MUST CREDIT)

Raining spiders after Victorian floods

animals

Despite headlines of an ‘arachnid apocalypse’ and startling images of cobwebs blanketing country Victoria, locals and experts alike are mesmerised by the spiders’ ingenious survival technique

Latest

Wasabi the Pekingese wins Westminster dog show

Pelkingese dog "Wasabi" is seen with the trophy after winning Best in Show at the 145th Annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show June 13, 2021 at the Lyndhurst Estate in Tarrytown, New York. - Spectators are not allowed this year, apart from dog owners and handlers, because of safety protocols due to Covid-19. (Photo by TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFP)
animals

Wasabi the Pekingese is one hot hound, beating 2500 other pooches to the top prize: best in show at the world-famous Westminster Kennel Club dog show in the US

China’s wandering elephants become global stars

A migrating herd of elephants graze near Shuanghe Township, Jinning District of Kunming city in the Yunnan Province of southwestern China. Already famous at home, China's wandering elephants are now becoming international stars. Major global media, including satellite news stations, news papers and wire services are chronicling the herd's more-than year-long, 500 km trek from their home in a wildlife reserve in mountainous southwest Yunnan province to the outskirts of the provincial capital of Kunming. (Yunnan Forest Fire Brigade via AP
animals

After more than a year on the move, the antics of a Chinese herd of elephants are proving irresistible to social and world media

Aussie Dylan Alcott wins third French Open

PARIS, FRANCE - JUNE 07: Dylan Alcott of Australia lifts the winners trophy following victory in their quad wheelchair mens singles final against Sam Schroder of The Netherlands during day nine of the 2021 French Open at Roland Garros on June 07, 2021 in Paris, France. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)
sport

For the third year in a row in France, and 13th time in his career, Aussie wheelchair tennis ace Dylan Alcott is a Grand Slam champion

Huge new national park for outback NSW

An Australian Bustard which lives in the nature reserve on the 13,000 hectare Mt Pleasant cattle station between Collinsville and Bowen. Picture: Garlone Moulin
environment

Australia is set to get a new national park after the NSW government’s purchase of two sheep stations totalling 60,000ha near Broken Hill in western NSW

Radioactive rhino horns to the rescue?

Scientists in South Africa have injected radioactive material into the horns of two rhinos in a novel effort to save the species from poachers., James Larkin, a professor at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and an expert in radiation protection, said that the stable isotopes used were harmless and that he “doesn’t want to kill anyone” with the infusion: “We just want to use the natural reticence towards radioactive material to decrease demand for rhino horn and also make it easier , From sourcE:, https://www.facebook.com/Rhisotope/
animals

A radical – indeed radioactive – scientific solution has begun in South Africa to save the rhino species by deterring poachers

Teen climate warriors have their day in court

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA- News Wire photos MAY 27 2021- (LR)  Laura Kirwan (17), Izzy Raj-Seppings (14), Ava Princi (17) and Liv Heaton posing for a photo out the front of the Federal law court on Phillip st in Sydney. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Adam Yip
environment

Aussie teenage climate activists have lost their court bid to stop a NSW mine expansion, but ‘duty of care’ ruling declared a win

How to make a pen pal with purpose

KIDS NEWS The Sunshine Initiative, b kinder day, Fly High Billie. Keith Petersen, Principal Junior School with Arndell Anglican College students who sent cards from Australia to Woodville Primary in the UK to cheer up the students there after a tough time through Covid-19. Picture: supplied.
civics

Children’s charity Fly High Billie invites Aussie kids to write to students in Covid hotspots abroad this B Kinder Day on June 22

How airport sniffer dogs could detect Covid-19

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - SEPTEMBER 18: English Springer Spaniel Floki, who is 1 of 2 South Australian dogs is taking part the Covid-19 detection training at the University of Adelaide on September 18, 2020 in Adelaide, Australia. Researchers from the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences at the University of Adelaide are working to train sniffer dogs to detect COVID-19 in people. The Adelaide study is part of an international research effort aimed at training COVID-19 detection dogs who could be used to screen people for coronavirus such as at airports, hospitals or quarantine facilities. The dogs taking part in the study at the University of Adelaide are being trained to pick the positive COVID-19 sweat sample from a line-up of samples, using positive reinforcement in the form of play with their favourite toy for each correct answer. Early results also show dogs trained in this way are able to identify infected individuals prior to the development of symptoms, or in those who are otherwise asymptomatic. (Photo by Kelly Barnes/Getty Images)
animals

Sniffer dogs are a step closer to being used in Australian airports to identify Covid-19 carriers after successful first trials

Would you wash with snail slime soap?

French artisan Damien Desrocher is making soap from snail slime. For Kids News. Image: Reuters
animals

One French artisan believes snail slime has anti-ageing properties that make it perfect for his boutique beauty soap

Aussie invention coins reveal national love of chocolate

KIDS NEWS: Australia Post's Great Aussie Coin Hunt. Lucy and Archie, both 7, pictured with a giant M for MILO. Picture: Australia Post/David Swift.
history

Some of Australia’s best chocolate creations are being celebrated on new $1 coins – along with other great Aussie inventions

New dinosaur named in Mexico

A new species of dinosaur called Tlatolophus galorum has been discovered in Mexico. Image from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH)
animals

Eight years after the first of its fossilised remains were found in Mexico, palaeontologists confirm a new species of crested dinosaur

Earth’s scorching desert heat tops 80C

Sunset in Sonoran Desert, near Phoenix. Picture: iStock

Doc Holiday, escape
weather

Death Valley is no longer the hottest place on Earth, according to scientists who have found two even hotter places. We look at how Australia’s hottest places compare

The Aussie landmark coins to flip over

NEWS360 - Australia Post  partnership. Great Aussie Coin Hunt: Opera House.
EMBARGOED until launch  story Monday 10 May.  
Hugo, seven, pictured in front of Sydney Opera House. Picture: Australia Post/David Swift.
history

Australia Post’s new collectable coins feature some of Australia’s best loved landmarks. Find out which ones made the Great Aussie Coin Hunt along with some cool facts about the icons

Antarctic ice shelf calves massive iceberg

An enormous iceberg has calved from the western side of the Ronne Ice Shelf, lying in the Weddell Sea, in Antarctica. The iceberg, dubbed A-76, measures around 4320 sq km in size – currently making it the largest berg in the world.

Picture: ESA
geography

An iceberg 170km long, 25km wide and the largest of its kind in the world has broken off Antarctica. It formed as scientists reported the previous largest iceberg had broken up and melted

World Bee Day creates buzz

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MAY 18: Bees are seen on a honeycomb cell  at the BEE Lab hives at The University of Sydney on May 18, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. The BEE Lab researches the behaviour, ecology and evolution of bees combining work in both the lab and the field. Australian bee populations were decimated by the Black Summer bushfires at the end of 2019 and early 2020 with around 2.5 billion bees and 10,000 commercial beehives destroyed in New South Wales and Victoria alone. Increased rainfall over the last year, along with concerted efforts by Australian apiarists has seen bee populations recover in 2021. Australia has an estimated 2,000 species of native bee, along with the European honey bee, which according to the NSW Department of Primary Industries plays an important role in large-scale agricultural pollination services and provide beeswax and honey to the domestic and export market. With bee populations under significant threat globally from extreme climate events, destruction of natural habitat, intensive farming practices, pests and disease, World Bee Day on 20 May aims to increase awareness and highlight the significance of bees and other pollinators to ensure food security, biodiversity and maintain a healthy ecosystem. (Photo by Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images)
environment

We all know bees make honey, but their importance in Australia extends far beyond producing a beloved breakfast spread

Australia’s Olympic Games uniforms unveiled

DAILY TELEGRAPH - Pictured are Olympic Athletes (L-R) Gronya Somerville, Lachlan Tame, Keesja Gofers, Jess Fox, George Ford, Bendere Oboya, Tarni Stepto, Dan Watkins and Safwan Khalil, unveiling the Sportscraft Tokyo Olympic Games Uniforms at Wylies Baths in Coogee today. Picture: Tim Hunter.
sport

Australia’s Olympic Games uniforms for Tokyo show how clothes carry stories, memories and inspiration for our athletes

Meet Australia’s oldest ever man

Dexter Kruger.
civics

Queenslander Dexter Kruger has set a new record as Australia’s oldest ever man, notching up 111 years and 124 days and showing no signs of slowing down

Aussie coins encourage conservation in kids

WEEKEND TELEGRAPHS SPECIAL. MUST TALK WITH PIC ED JEFF DARMANIN BEFORE PUBLISHING - Pictured at home in Manly today is Iggy 10 and Atticus Jenkins 6, with Australia Posts Great Aussie Coin Hunt collectables. Picture: Tim Hunter.
animals

Zookeeper and bushfire survivor Chad Staples says showcasing native creatures in the Great Aussie Coin Hunt is “so important” for conservation awareness

World’s longest pedestrian suspension bridge opens

People cross for the first time the 516 Arouca Bridge, the world's longest pedestrian suspension bridge with a length of 516 metres and a height of 175 metres, in Arouca in northern Portugal on April 29, 2021. (Photo by CARLOS COSTA / AFP)
news

Would you be brave enough to walk across this bridge with its wobbly, see-through walkway 174m above the ground?

NASA probe ‘touches the Sun’

An artist's impression of the Parker Solar Probe approaching the Sun. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben
space

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe has broken its own record as the fastest man-made object in history as its speed brings it closer and closer to the Sun.

Sherpa Kami summits Everest for record 25th time

In this photograph taken on May 2, 2021, Nepal's mountaineer Kami Rita Sherpa (3R) performs a ritual after an interview with AFP at the Everest base camp in the Mount Everest region of Solukhumbu district, as Sherpa on May 7 reached the summit of Mount Everest for the 25th time, breaking his own record for most summits of the highest mountain in the world. (Photo by Prakash MATHEMA / AFP)
humanities

Nepalese Sherpa Kami Rita has set a new record for the most Everest ascents, reaching the summit of the world’s highest peak for the 25th time

The Great Aussie Coin Hunt is here

CANBERRA, AUSTRALIA NewsWire 
Photos APRIL 28, 2021:  
Bronwyn Scott, Royal Australian Mint coin designer who designed the new A-Z of 'Aussie' $1 coins launching 9 May for Australia Post.
Picture: NCA NewsWire / Gary Ramage
money

The Great Aussie Coin Hunt is back at Australia Post, with the new A-Z of $1 collectable coins from the Royal Australian Mint full of fun and surprises

World’s widest plane aces test flight

KIDS NEWS: The Stratolaunch Roc aircraft, a six-engine jet with the world's longest wingspan, completed its second tsr flight, Thursday, April 29, 2021 in Mojave, California. Picture: AP Photo/Matt Hartman.
space

Two years after its first flight, the gigantic Stratolaunch aircraft took to the skies for a second time above the Mojave Desert in the US.

Some good news for endangered Sumatran rhino

SUNDAY ESCAPE. WILDLIFE WISHLIST. Sumatran rhino. Picture: Taronga Conservation Society Australia
animals

With only an estimated 80 Sumatran rhinos left in the wild, the results of a new study deliver welcome hope for the survival of the species.

Weird fish makes comeback in Murray River

A lamprey fish close up. Picture: Department for Environment and Water South Australia
environment

Scientists have found a spooky-looking, bloodsucking, critically endangered native fish in record numbers in the Murray River system, which is great news for the environment and lamprey fish

Just three per cent of Earth untouched by humans

ESCAPE: Toucan, Peru - uniworld, peru, amazon, rainforest, nature, wildlife, animals, toucan, Bird. Picture: Uniworld
environment

A new scientific study has found as little as 3 per cent of the world’s land surfaces are still home to their full range of native species and remain unspoilt by human activity

Group spends 40 days in French cave for experiment

Members of the French team that participated in the "Deep Time" study pose for a photo after exiting the Lombrives Cave in Ussat les Bains, France, Saturday, April 24, 2021. After 40 days in voluntary isolation, 15 people participating in a scientific experiment have emerged from a vast cave in southwestern France. Eight men and seven women lived in the dark, damp depths of the Lombrives cave in the Pyrenees to help researchers understand how people adapt to drastic changes in living conditions and environments. They had no clocks, no sunlight and no contact with the world above. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
science

Imagine 40 days in a cave without light, clocks or technology. That’s what a group of 15 volunteers has done for a scientific experiment in France

Fitbits for Phillip Island penguins

Ever thought your other half wasn't pulling their weight in the parenting role? Well it appears that Little Penguins have the same issue! A new paper published in the International Society for Behavioural Ecology's journal, shows some individual penguins work harder than their partners to feed their chicks. The study is part of joint research between Australian and French scientists. According to one of the paper's authors, Phillip Island Nature Parks' Penguin Biologist, Dr Andre Chiaradia, the findings come as something of a surprise, as it was previously thought both parents contributed equally to raising chicks.
animals

Phillip Island’s little penguins are small but mighty adaptable, according to a new scientific study using custom-made ‘fitbits’.

Volcanic eruption photo wins top prize

This startling picture of a volcanic eruption captured first prize in the competition Credit: FRANCISCO NEGRONI/PHOTO IS LIGHT/TNG
arts

A photo titled The Landscape of Fear and showing a volcano erupting within an incredible electrical storm has won first prize in a global photography contest. See some of our favourite photos

Leeches invade NSW homes after floods

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 21: A leech slithers along the ground in Windsor on March 21, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. Evacuation warnings are in place for parts of Western Sydney as floodwaters continue to rise. (Photo by Jenny Evans/Getty Images)
animals

The recent floods in NSW have brought more than just record rainfall – and bloodthirsty leeches are loving it

Supermoon helps free stuck ship

A picture released by Egypt's Suez Canal Authority on March 29, 2021, shows a man waving the Egyptian flag after Panama-flagged MV 'Ever Given' container ship was fully dislodged from the banks of the Suez. - The ship was refloated and the Suez Canal reopened, sparking relief almost a week after the huge container ship got stuck and blocked a major artery for global trade. Salvage crews have been working around the clock ever since the accident which has been blamed on high winds and poor visibility during a sandstorm. (Photo by - / SUEZ CANAL AUTHORITY / AFP)
geography

The stars, sun, Earth and moon all aligned in Egypt this week, with the year’s first supermoon bringing the high tide needed to shift the massive ship blocking the Suez Canal

Huge ship stuck sideways in Suez Canal

CORRECTION / A handout picture released by the Suez Canal Authority on March 24, 2021 shows a part of the Taiwan-owned MV Ever Given (Evergreen), a 400-metre- (1,300-foot-)long and 59-metre wide vessel, lodged sideways and impeding all traffic across the waterway of Egypt's Suez Canal. - A giant container ship ran aground in the Suez Canal after a gust of wind blew it off course, the vessel's operator said on March 24, 2021, bringing marine traffic to a halt along one of the world's busiest trade routes. (Photo by - / Suez CANAL / AFP) / “The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by Marina PASSOS has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [STR] instead of [Marina Passos]. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require.”
geography

A skyscraper-sized container ship 400m long has become wedged sideways across Egypt’s Suez Canal, blocking all traffic and threatening to disrupt global shipping

Erupting volcano becomes tourist attraction

TOPSHOT - Sunday hikers look at the lava flowing from the erupting Fagradalsfjall volcano some 40 km west of the Icelandic capital Reykjavik, on March 21, 2021. - Weekend hikers took the opportunity Sunday to inspect the area where a volcano erupted in Iceland on March 19, some 40 kilometres (25 miles) from the capital Reykjavik, the Icelandic Meteorological Office said, as a red cloud lit up the night sky and a no-fly zone was established in the area. (Photo by Jeremie RICHARD / AFP)
geography

Thousands of curious onlookers are flocking to an erupting volcano in Iceland for a rare up-close look at its flowing red lava

American city turns off lights to save birds

PHILADELPHIA ..  for John Huxley story  ..   the city skyline with the Ben Franklin Bridge over the Delaware River
animals

A group in the US city of Philadelphia has started Lights Out Philly to try to reduce the number of confused birds dying during migration

Explorer’s record setting dive to deepest point on Earth

Explorer Richard Garriott set the record for deepest dive when he dived at the Mariana Trench. For Kids News
geography

A multi-millionaire explorer has become the first person to travel to Earth’s four furthest extremes after diving almost 11,000m to the bottom of the Mariana Trench

Mount Etna’s spectacular volcanic eruption

CATANIA, ITALY FEBRUARY 21, 2021: Mount Etna erupts in Sicily sending plumes of ash and spewing lava into air - PHOTOGRAPH BY Marco Restivo / Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Marco Restivo/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
geography

Mount Etna, Europe’s most active volcano, has awed even experienced volcanologists, pumping out spectacular displays of lava, ash and volcanic rocks for more than a week

Koala teeth used to create archaeology map

Great Australian Wildlife Collection by Discovery channel. Koala bear eats leaves in tree. Phascolarctos cinereus. South Australia.
history

Australian archaeologists are studying ancient koala teeth and bones to create a map that will show how people and animals moved across the continent through history

A billion years on Earth in 40 seconds

University of Adelaide Professor Alan Collins from the Tectonics & Earth Systems Research Group in the Department of Earth Sciences. Supplied.
geography

University of Adelaide scientists have released a video that, for the first time, shows the movement of the Earth’s tectonic plates over the past billion years

Kids set sail on adventure of a lifetime

FEBRUARY 4TH 2021: Erin and Dave Carey
with their kids Hamish (11), Jack (10) and Christian (6) are planning on travelling around the world on a Yacht. Photographer at North Haven. Picture: Kelly Barnes
geography

Three Australian children are ditching regular life on land to sail the Atlantic Ocean on a yacht with their parents ‘for as long as it’s fun’, which could mean two, five or even 10 years at sea

Humans have made the oceans very noisy

The Queen Mary 2 (QM2) arrives at Port Everglades in Florida on her maiden voyage 26 Jan 2004, as tug boats shoot water cannons to celebrate her arrival. AFP picRobert/Sullivan cruise liner ship ships shipping
environment

With rumbling ships, hammering oil drills and other big noises, humans have completely altered the underwater soundscape, in some cases deafening or disorienting whales and other animals

Hanging out with Smudge at Antarctica

Antarctic expeditioner Matthew Williams and his mate Smudge the Emperor Penguin at the Auster rookery. Pictures: Matthew Williams and Guy Edgar
animals

A curious emperor penguin nicknamed Smudge has made friends with an Australian Antarctic expeditioner undertaking the annual penguin census at the Auster and Taylor rookeries

Student solves poem clues, finds treasure chest

CORRECTS CREDIT TO ADDISON DOTY - This undated photo provided by Forrest Fenn shows a chest purported to contain gold dust, hundreds of rare gold coins, gold nuggets and other artifacts.  For more than a decade, the 82-year-old claims he has packed and repacked the treasure chest, before burying it in the mountains somewhere north of Santa Fe. (AP Photo/Addison Doty)
just for fun

The identity has been revealed of the person who solved clues written into a poem, then found a famous gold-filled treasure chest hidden more than a decade ago in the wilds of Wyoming

New height agreed for Mount Everest

(FILES) This file photo taken on February 7, 2020 from a commercial aircraft shows an aerial view of Mount Everest (C) and the Himalayan mountain range, some 140kms (87 miles) north-east of Kathmandu. - The highest point on Earth got a bit higher on December 8 as China and Nepal finally agreed on a precise elevation for Mount Everest after decades of debate. The agreed height unveiled at a joint news conference in Kathmandu of 8,848.86 metres (29,031 feet) was 86 centimetres (2.8 feet) higher than the measurement previously recognised by Nepal, and more than four metres above China's official figure. (Photo by Jewel SAMAD / AFP)
mathematics

China and Nepal jointly announced a new and slightly higher official height of 8848.86m for Mount Everest on Tuesday, ending a disagreement between the two nations

Library book returned after 33-year voyage

Librarian Julie Zacchei. A booked loaned out by Townsville Library in 1987 has been around the world, before being returned to it's rightful owner. PICTURE: MATT TAYLOR.
geography

A book that has travelled the world on yachts with sailors since 1987 has finally been returned to the Townsville library with a note that reads “we are sorry that this book is a little overdue”

Aussie telescope maps new atlas of the Universe

ASKAP telescope
space

In under two weeks the CSIRO’s world-leading radio telescope in Western Australia has created a Google Maps-like atlas or map of our Universe, in the meantime discovering many new galaxies

Solving the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

The Bermuda Triangle is said to have claimed more than 1000 lives over the past 100 years.
explainers

Ships and planes have disappeared without a trace in the Bermuda Triangle. But is there really anything strange going on? Kids News looks at the history of this fascinating phenomenon

First-ever Aussie sighting of bigfin squid

One of the Bigfin Squid found in the Great Australian Bight. The size of this squid coud not be determined due to poor visibilty. Picture: CSIRO
animals

Australian scientists have filmed five bigfin squid in the Great Australian Bight, the first time they’ve been seen in Australian waters. Little is known about these creatures of the deep

Gigantic iceberg on collision course with island

Adolescent elephant seals are exceptionally engaging subjects. Elephant seals are found on many subantarctic islands such as South Georgia, as well as along parts of the Argentine coast. While the island supports limited vegetation and terrestrial life (75 percent of the island is under snow and ice), marine life is abundant.
environment

An iceberg the size of a small country is floating toward the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, raising fears seal and penguin parents won’t be able to access food or get back to their young

Found! New reef taller than a skyscraper

geography

A new coral reef like an underwater mountain and taller than any building in Australia has been discovered in remote waters off Cape York, Queensland, its pinnacle about 40m below the surface

2000-year-old cat found carved in desert

Handout picture released by the Peruvian Ministry of Culture and taken on October 15, 2020 showing a giant cat figure etched into a slope at the Unesco world heritage site in the desert near the town of Nasca in southern Peru, after its was discovered by archaeologists and the area was cleaned as the geoglyph was barely visible and about to disappear due to erosion. - The geoglyph measures 37 metres from head to tail and forms part of the Nasca Lines — the hundreds of geoglyphs, including a hummingbird, a monkey and a pelican, carved into a coastal plain about 400 km south of Lima. According to a statement by the Peruvian ministry of culture, after cleaning the area the lines were found to measure between 30 and 40 cm in width. The Nazca Lines date back to between 500 BC and 500 AD, and cover an area of about 450 square km. They were given world heritage status in 1994. (Photo by - / Peruvian Ministry of Culture / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / PERU'S CULTURE MINISTRY" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
history

A huge cat carving has been unearthed on a hillside in southern Peru and is thought to be a 2000-year-old Nazca Line. Around 1000 have already been discovered

Tree-hugging tiger photo wins wildlife award

Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners announced -  The embrace by Sergey Gorshkov, Russia
Winner 2020, Animals in their Environment, GRAND TITLE WINNER

With an expression of sheer ecstasy, a tigress hugs an ancient Manchurian fir, rubbing her cheek against bark to leave secretions from her scent glands. She is an Amur, or Siberian, tiger, here in the Land of the Leopard National Park, in the Russian Far East. The race – now regarded as the same subspecies as the Bengal tiger – is found only in this region, with a small number surviving over the border in China and possibly a few in North Korea. Hunted almost to extinction in the past century, the population is still threatened by poaching and logging, which also impacts their prey – mostly deer and wild boar, which are also hunted. But recent (unpublished) camera‑trap surveys indicate that greater protection may have resulted in a population of possibly 500–600 – an increase that it is hoped a future formal census may confirm. Low prey densities mean that tiger territories are huge. Sergey knew his chances were slim but was determined to take a picture of the totem animal of his Siberian homeland. Scouring the forest for signs, focusing on trees along regular routes where tigers might have left messages – scent, hairs, urine or scratch marks – he installed his first proper camera trap in January 2019, opposite this grand fir. But it was not until November that he achieved the picture he had planned for, of a magnificent tigress in her Siberian forest environment.  

Nikon Z-7 + 50mm f1.8 lens; 1/200 sec at f6.3; ISO 250; Cognisys camera-trap system.
animals

Judges called this photo of a Siberian tiger a “scene like no other” and declared it the overall winning entry in the Wildlife Photographer Of The Year competition. See all the winning photos

All aboard Emily, the big jet to nowhere

ESCAPE:  ALICE SPRINGS, 2 MARCH 2018 – Qantas’ newest Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, which features a unique Indigenous livery, touched down in Alice Springs today. Picture: Qantas 
Yam Deaming by Emily Kame Kngwarreye
geography

The Great Southern Land scenic flight is thought to be the fastest-selling flight in Qantas history, giving passengers a birds-eye view of Australia then delivering them back to where the flight began

Very rare ‘walking’ scorpion fish spotted on Reef

Scientists have viewed the deepest regions of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park
science

On an expedition by a robot to the depths of the Great Barrier Reef, scientists have found new species of black coral, sponges and a rare and awkward-looking “walking” scorpion fish

Scientists solve mystery of giant melting glacier

Thwaites glacier is said to be 'the most vulnerable place in Antarctica' Credit: AFP
environment

Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier — more than twice as big as Tasmania — is melting from below, putting it at risk of collapse. Scientists now know warm water flowing beneath it is to blame

Nature’s fury and beauty captured in winning photos

7PM, 27TH AUGUST 2020 EMBARGO FOR ONLINE, EMBARGO FOR PRINT 28TH AUGUST 2020, PREMIUM NETWORK CONTENT, NO AUSTRALIAN, NO NEWS.COM, NO SKY, NO WEST AUS, *ONLY FOR NEWS CORP MASTHEAD PAPERS*,  Overall Winner (originally Landscape) Ben Blanche.
A fire caused by a lightning strike in Mount Barney National Park.
It slowly marched over the peak as it moved around the border area of Queensland and New South Wales.
arts

A snap of a Black Summer bushfire has been named Australia’s best nature photograph in a competition that celebrates the country’s wild side

Brain holds key to Antarctic ice ship mystery

A strange 'ice ship' has been spotted on Google Earth by eagle-eyed conspiracy theorists Credit: YOUTUBE/MRMBBB333
explainers

Conspiracy theorists claim they’ve found a huge capsized ship about 160km off the coast of Antarctica but the mystery is most likely solved by looking at how human brains work

Female Aussie swimmer tops men’s world record

A handout picture taken on and released in London on August 16, 2020, shows Australian marathon swimmer Chloe McCardel reacting aboard her support boat, off the coast of Calais, northeast France,  after completing her 35th swim across the English Channel. - A Australian marathon swimmer on Sunday became the second woman to break the men's record for number of Channel crossings -- and avoided new UK quarantine rules on French arrivals on her return. Chloe McCardel, from Sydney, completed her 35th swim across the world's busiest shipping lane after emerging on the northern French shoreline in the early hours of Sunday. (Photo by Jason Kelvin / Newgate Comms / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT  " AFP PHOTO / HANDOUT /  Jason Kelvin via Newgate Comms"  -  NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS   -   DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  -  NO ARCHIVE
sport

Marathon swimmer Chloe McCardel has completed her 35th English Channel crossing — her fourth in 16 days and more than any man — battling fog, darkness, ships and quarantine rules

See the sights on a holiday to nowhere

ESCAPE: How I travel, Celeste Mitchell -  Italian ice - cream cone held in hand on the background of Piazza Navona in Rome , Italy  Picture: Istock
just for fun

Business is booming during coronavirus-related restrictions for a virtual travel company that helps you have a holiday without going anywhere

Volcano on Pacific Ring of Fire erupts

TOPSHOT - Mount Sinabung spews thick ash and smoke into the sky in Karo, North Sumatra on August 10, 2020. (Photo by Anto Sembiring / AFP)
geography

Indonesia’s Mount Sinabung has erupted, sending ash 5km into the sky. It’s the latest eruption along the 40,000km-long line of volcanoes, faults and trenches called the Pacific Ring of Fire

Penguin poop images from space reveal new Antarctic colonies

The smudges on the ice show the existence of an emperor penguin colony. Image taken from the European Commission’s Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite
animals

New satellite images of emperor penguin droppings have revealed a surprising number of colonies in Antarctica, where the flightless birds are under threat from global warming

Hole in dam wall saves epic eel journey

P1290288
environment

Eels in Tasmania can now swim through a hole drilled in a dam wall to help them begin their incredible 3000km migration north to breeding grounds in the Coral Sea around New Caledonia

Last 747 flying kangaroo in the sky

From Flight radar
The pilots on Australia's last QANTAS 747 (QF7474) to leave Australia decided to make the QANTAS logo via GPS on their way to the plane graveyard in LA.
history

After 50 years of service, the Qantas 747s — nicknamed the Queen of the Skies — are retiring and the last plane on its last flight traced the shape of a kangaroo in the sky

Calls to better protect world-famous giant cuttlefish site

Giant Australian Cuttlefish aggregation  off the coast of Whyalla in the Spencer Gulf  - picture Scott Portelli
animals

Pressure is mounting on the SA government to reverse a decision allowing fishing of giant cuttlefish in the Spencer Gulf, where they mass each year to spawn, the only place in the world this happens

Huge outback station to become national park

This undated handout from the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Services released on June 27, 2020 shows a grey grasswren at Narriearra Station, a 153,415-hectare (379,000 acres) property in Australia's far northwest New South Wales. - A slice of Australian outback almost the size of greater London will be turned into a national park to help protect threatened species after authorities bought the land on June 27, 2020. (Photo by Jeff HARDY / NSW NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICES / AFP) / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NSW NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICES/JEFF HARDY " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  - NO ARCHIVE
environment

The NSW government has bought more than 1500 square kilometres of the state for a new national park to protect 25 threatened animal species and important habitat

Why don’t you sink in the Dead Sea?

ESCAPE:  Woman with sun hat holding and reading a newspaper while lying on back with crossed feet, floating in salty water of Dead Sea, Israel, Middle East.  Picture: Istock
explainers

Ask people what they know about the Dead Sea and most will tell you that it’s impossible to sink when you’re swimming in it, but not everyone knows why. Kids News did some research

Scientists map ancient lost continent

A handout photo released by Nature shows an artist's impression of life restoration of the Savannasaurus elliottorum based on the type specimen (“Wade”) and comparisons with titanosaurs from around the world.  Scientists unveiled on October 20, 2016 fossils from a new species of giant, long-necked dinosaur discovered in northeastern Australia, speculating that it may have traversed Antarctica from South America some 105 million years ago.   / AFP PHOTO / NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP / Travis TISCHLER / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NATURE / Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History TRAVIS TISCHLER" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
geography

Towering titanosaurs and other dinosaurs once roamed the vast, mountainless lands between the east of Australia and New Zealand on a lost continent called Zealandia

Climbers to remeasure height of Everest

In this May 16, 2020 aerial photo released by Xinhua News Agency, Chinese surveyors hike toward a higher spot from the base camp on Mount Qomolangma at an altitude of 5,200 meters. The Chinese government-backed team plans to summit Mount Everest this week at a time when the world's tallest peak has been closed to commercial climbers. (Jigme Dorje/Xinhua via AP)
geography

A team of climbers is on its way to summit Mount Everest this week to measure whether it has grown as Earth’s tectonic plates move and try to end international disagreement on the subject

Cave find rewrites history of early humans

Primeval Caveman Wearing Animal Skin Holds Stone Tipped Spear Looks Around, Explores Prehistoric Forest in a Hunt for Animal Prey. Neanderthal Going Hunting in the Jungle
history

Scientists have found human bones and a tooth up to 46,000 years old that rewrite the history of early humans’ arrival in Europe and time spent living alongside Neanderthals

Football-sized chunk of the Moon for sale

A piece of Moon rock
space

One of the largest Moon rocks on Earth is up for sale, probably chipped off the surface of the Moon by a collision with an asteroid or comet and then plunging down in the Sahara Desert

‘Crazy beast’ prehistoric mammal found

The Adalatherium was a bizarre creature that lived around 66 million
 years ago on the island of Madagascar. Picture: Facebook/Denver Museum of
 Nature & Science
animals

The skeleton of a backward-toothed mammal nicknamed “crazy beast” that existed alongside dinosaurs 66 million years ago has been unveiled by Australian palaeontologists

Found! Antarctic frog fossils from warmer times

Dr Jodi Rowley with James Alcock
animals

Experts have discovered cold-blooded frogs once lived on a warm Antarctica 40 million years ago PLUS Australian scientists need your help for a frog-finding mission closer to home

Exploring the 250th anniversary of Cook’s arrival

this
 ESCAPE HAWAII PHILIP HEADS STORY
 Sailing ship HM Bark Endeavour replica of the HMS Endeavour which carried Captain James Cook on his South Pacific expedition at anchor in Kealakekua Bay, Hawaii, USA 30 Oct 1999. 
 /Sailing/ships Picture: Ap
history

Wednesday, April 29, 2020 marks the 250th anniversary of James Cook’s arrival at Botany Bay. We explore why Cook came to Australia and why some celebrate and some lament this day

Earthquakes signal Iceland’s volcanoes waking up

TOPSHOT - A picture taken on April 2, 2020, shows molten lava spraying during an eruption of the Piton de le Fournaise volcano, on the French Indian Ocean island of La Reunion. (Photo by Richard BOUHET / AFP)
science

Scientists warn that a volcanic area of Iceland is becoming active, with more than 8000 earthquakes recorded since January 21 and 10cm of land uplift as magma pushes up from below

Take a virtual tour around the world

Walk the Great Wall of China without moving a muscle. PHOTO: Istock
technology

Visit the Great Wall of China, see the Mona Lisa or watch zoo animals without leaving home. Here are 10 top virtual experiences plus one very special out-of-this-world tour

Exploring the lost city of Pompeii

ESCAPE: DOC HOLIDAY May 29  ..  Apollo statue in Pompeii, Italy (apollo temple). Picture: Supplied
history

On April 1, 1748, a Spanish engineer rediscovered Pompeii, changing the way we thought about historical artefacts and beginning the longest archaeological dig in the world

What and where is the equator?

Picture supplied by Joel Selwood.   Joel Selwood and his dad at the Equator
explainers

Parachutists have set a world record for crossing the equator 12 times in a single jump, which got us wondering what the equator is, where it is and why do they launch space rockets there?

Aussie treasures stored in global code bank

The film reels are sorted by country. Picture: supplied
technology

The scientific knowledge about Australia’s plants and animals and the contents of our national library are among the digital treasures being kept 250m underground in Norway

World’s wonderful wildlife on show

*EMBARGO - FOR MONDAY PAPERS, 9 MARCH, 2020* 
GROUP RIGHTS, ONE TIME USE
 MUST CREDIT Marcus Westberg/2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Image Name: Spread'em

Photographer Name: Marcus Westberg

Year: 2020

Image Description: I had spent several days in a hide in Onguma Private Reserve, near Etosha, Namibia, initially hoping to see elephants or big cats, but enjoying all the visitors that came to the waterhole nearby. I knew if I was patient enough I would have a good chance of photographing giraffes as they came in to drink, but I never imagined any of them would squeeze in between the hide and the waterhole! This presented me with a different perspective than I had envisioned. Patience, and a willingness to sit quietly in nature is often reward in itself - although in this case I was delighted to leave with an image like this. 

Copyright: © Marcus Westberg, Sweden, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards
arts

Photos of a giraffe’s bottom, a monkey deep in thought, a hunting eagle and a kookaburra surveying burned forest have each taken out prizes in the Sony World Photography Awards 2020

Farewell Aurora Australis, our beloved Antarctic ship

Emperor penguins  on the pack ice in the foreground with the Aurora Australis parked in ice in the background in 2008 . Please Credit - Mike Zupanc/Australian Antarctic Division
science

The Australian Antarctic Division’s famous bright orange research ship Aurora Australis departed for Macquarie Island this week on one last voyage before its retirement

WHO officially declares COVID-19 coronavirus a pandemic

A masked reveller walks on San Marco square in Venice on February 25, 2020, during the usual period of the Carnival festivities which have been cancelled following an outbreak of the COVID-19 novel coronavirus in northern Italy. - Italy's new coronavirus spread south on February 25 to Tuscany and Sicily, as the civil protection agency reported a surge in the number of infected people and Rome convened emergency talks. (Photo by ANDREA PATTARO / AFP)
health

As WHO officially declares the global coronavirus crisis a pandemic, PM Scott Morrison announces a $2.4 billion package for Australia’s health system to help it respond to the crisis

Has Yoshi the turtle swum home to Australia?

Yoshi the turtle when she was still in the aquarium. Picture: Two Oceans Aquarium
animals

An endangered turtle has reached WA after a two-year, 37,000km swim, possibly the longest animal journey recorded by a satellite tag, which has scientists wondering if she was born here

Life on remote Goudier Island, Antarctica

British Base and Post Office, Port Lockroy, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, Polar Regions
geography

As a post office worker at Port Lockroy, one of the main tasks is cleaning up penguin poo, the toilet is a bucket with a lid and though you get one day off every 14, there’s nowhere to go

Bird’s-eye view of our beautiful planet Earth

Google Earth satellite images from space
geography

Google has added 1000 new images to Earth View – a collection of the most beautiful landscapes from Google Earth. And a farmer’s marriage proposal makes it onto Google Maps

Children race llamas to save World Heritage park

A child sits on a llama before racing it in Los Llanganates, National Park, Ecuador, Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020. Wooly llamas, an animal emblematic of the Andean mountains in South America, become the star for a day each year when Ecuadoreans dress up their prized animals for children to ride them in 500-meter races. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
environment

Risking injury and braving the cold, children as young as four race llamas across a high-altitude region of Ecuador each year to help save one of the most important wetlands on Earth

NASA animation shows Earth without oceans

The NASA animation simulates would the Earth would look like if the oceans dried up. Picture: NASA
geography

Travel back in time thousands of years through this NASA animation to look at Earth without oceans, when vast lands allowed ancient people to roam the world

Tourists rescued as island volcano erupts

White Island Volcano in New Zealand has erupted today.
Early reports are suggesting upwards of 20 people were on the Island when it erupted.
geography

New Zealand’s White Island volcano has erupted suddenly forcing the dramatic rescue of tourists who were exploring the crater floor when it began to rumble

First Aussie reaches heart of Antarctica

** SPEAK TO COURIER MAIL PIC DESK *** ICEMAN: Gold Coast vet and adventurer Geoff Wilson who is going into a deep freezer to test his gear in preparation for a solo crossing of Antarctica to raise funds for the McGrath Foundation.
Picture: NIGEL HALLETT
humanities

An adventurer from Queensland has become the first Australian to reach Antarctica’s Pole of Inaccessibility, just one leg of an epic journey to help men and women experiencing breast cancer

World map of most common last names

The world map of names
geography

A fascinating new map has plotted out the most common surnames in every country in the world. Can you guess the most common last name in Australia?

15 amazing sculptures around the world

Mother Nature, Canada. Picure: Alamy
arts

Earth is so big and so filled with things to see it’s hard to know where to start looking. To help you out, we’ve compiled this collection of incredible sculptures to look at and learn about

Record floods swamp historic Venice

TOPSHOT - A woman  crosses the flooded St. Mark's squareby St. Mark's Basilica after an exceptional overnight "Alta Acqua" high tide water level, early on November 13, 2019 in Venice. - Powerful rainstorms hit Italy on November 12, with the worst affected areas in the south and Venice, where there was widespread flooding. Within a cyclone that threatens the country, exceptional high water were rising in Venice, with the sirocco winds blowing northwards from the Adriatic sea against the lagoon’s outlets and preventing the water from flowing back into the sea. At 22:40pm the tide reached 183 cm, the second measure in history after the 198 cm of the 1966 flood. (Photo by Marco Bertorello / AFP)
weather

UNESCO World Heritage Site Venice is in a state of emergency after “apocalyptic” floods swept through the historic Italian city, with the mayor blaming climate change

Weary firefighters hailed as heroes

Firefighters work to contain a bushfire along Old Bar road in Old Bar, NSW, Saturday, November 9, 2019. Two people have been killed and seven others are missing in bushfires in NSW which have also destroyed at least 100 homes. (AAP Image/Darren Pateman) NO ARCHIVING
humanities

As several states prepare for increasing fire danger in coming days, we look at the incredible efforts of firefighters on the ground day and night 

Alive! Creature thought extinct found

A silver-backed chevrotain. Picture: Global Wildlife Conservation
animals

A tiny, deer-like creature that “seemingly only existed as part of our imagination” has been found in a forest almost 30 years after the last official sighting

Australia’s most incredible weather photos

Australian Weather Calendar 2020
weather

Rainbows, aurora australis and massive, fluffy clouds that make you want to bounce on them star in the year’s best weather photos, as judged by the Bureau of Meteorology

Mountaineer smashes world record by seven years

TOPSHOT - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NIRMAL 'NIMS' PURJA (BREMONT PROJECT POSSIBLE) This handout photo taken on May 22, 2019 and released by Nepali climber Nirmal 'Nims' Purja and his "Bremont Project Possible" team shows Purja standing at the summit of Mount Everest. - A Nepali mountaineer on October 29 smashed the speed record for summiting the world's 14 highest peaks, racing up all "8000ers" in just six months and six days, organisers said. (Photo by Handout / Nirmal 'Nims' Purja - Bremont Project Possible / AFP) / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NIRMAL 'NIMS' PURJA (BREMONT PROJECT POSSIBLE)" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  - NO ARCHIVES
humanities

A Nepalese mountaineer has climbed the world’s 14 highest peaks in just 189 days, his incredible feat smashing the previous record by more than seven years

Footy-shaped subs to swarm the seas

A supplied image obtained on Tuesday, October 29, 2019, shows Co-founders of UAM Tec, Ben Fleming (Managing Director) and Shawn Taylor (CEO) beside their Sub Mapping submarine. UAM Tec's Sub Mapping technology is the first fully autonomous and visual-based mapping submarine to exist in the world. (AAP Image/UAM Tec) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
geography

An Australian company is preparing to send a swarm of footy-shaped, mini-submarines into the world’s oceans, lakes and waterways to create an underwater version of Google Street View

Found: exact location of first humans’ home

Human evolution on the cliff with blue, map of earth, background. Human evolution of man / people, from monkey to modern man, going towards the end of the cliff. Ending an era or it can be as risk to end a business project / company. Behind is the map of the world with clouds.
geography

An Australian-led team of scientists has identified the exact place in northern Botswana that was the home of the earliest ancestors of everyone alive today

Small town strikes it lucky in big dry

Holding a water rubber hose tube. Watering
weather

Tenterfield — battling drought and, recently, bushfires — has struck it lucky with the discovery of underground water only 126 days before the town’s supply was due to run dry