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Environment

Archer the Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park. Picture: Dylan Robinson

Census to count every koala in bid to save species

animals

The Environment Minister unveiled a $2 million koala count as part of government’s commitment to protect the endangered species, while scientists call for threatened status for the platypus

Moonlit Sanctuary Pearcedale.

'Quinnie' the 2 year old female 'Spot Tailed Quoll' who was hand reared after being abandoned by its mother at 2 months of age. 'Quinnie' is one of the animals involved in the sanctuary's 'Conservation in Action' show.

Picture: Jason Sammon

Monday 20 June 2016

Predator-proof fence to create native wildlife haven

environment

A 10km fence will be built at a Victorian national park to protect endangered species from predatory pests

Activist taking care of environment during sorting paper waste to proper recycling bin on terrace

Room to improve Australia’s recycling efforts

environment

Australia is burying 67 million tonnes of garbage every year, equal to 2700kg for each person, a new report has found. That’s despite people saying they’re putting a lot of effort into recycling

Latest

Gene study finds two new glider species

MUST CREDIT WWF AND PHOTOGRAPHER. Greater glider in a patch of old growth forest south of Brisbane. The light greater glider and dark greater glider that are filmed separately sticking their heads out of the same hollow are a breeding pair. Picture: Josh Bowell
animals

Australian scientists have discovered two new species of one of our cutest and most-loved native animals, the greater glider. What we previously thought was one species is actually three

Gigantic iceberg on collision course with island

Adolescent elephant seals are exceptionally engaging subjects. Elephant seals are found on many subantarctic islands such as South Georgia, as well as along parts of the Argentine coast. While the island supports limited vegetation and terrestrial life (75 percent of the island is under snow and ice), marine life is abundant.
environment

An iceberg the size of a small country is floating toward the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, raising fears seal and penguin parents won’t be able to access food or get back to their young

Found! New reef taller than a skyscraper

geography

A new coral reef like an underwater mountain and taller than any building in Australia has been discovered in remote waters off Cape York, Queensland, its pinnacle about 40m below the surface

Fox without socks takes a liking to shoes

Looking to hunt down a feral pest before it takes a greater toll on our local wildlife.
animals

In a twist on the Dr Seuss story, a cunning fox is collecting shoes — but not socks — from front verandas in Adelaide, spreading them around the streets and hoarding them in its den

Tree-hugging tiger photo wins wildlife award

Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners announced -  The embrace by Sergey Gorshkov, Russia
Winner 2020, Animals in their Environment, GRAND TITLE WINNER

With an expression of sheer ecstasy, a tigress hugs an ancient Manchurian fir, rubbing her cheek against bark to leave secretions from her scent glands. She is an Amur, or Siberian, tiger, here in the Land of the Leopard National Park, in the Russian Far East. The race – now regarded as the same subspecies as the Bengal tiger – is found only in this region, with a small number surviving over the border in China and possibly a few in North Korea. Hunted almost to extinction in the past century, the population is still threatened by poaching and logging, which also impacts their prey – mostly deer and wild boar, which are also hunted. But recent (unpublished) camera‑trap surveys indicate that greater protection may have resulted in a population of possibly 500–600 – an increase that it is hoped a future formal census may confirm. Low prey densities mean that tiger territories are huge. Sergey knew his chances were slim but was determined to take a picture of the totem animal of his Siberian homeland. Scouring the forest for signs, focusing on trees along regular routes where tigers might have left messages – scent, hairs, urine or scratch marks – he installed his first proper camera trap in January 2019, opposite this grand fir. But it was not until November that he achieved the picture he had planned for, of a magnificent tigress in her Siberian forest environment.  

Nikon Z-7 + 50mm f1.8 lens; 1/200 sec at f6.3; ISO 250; Cognisys camera-trap system.
animals

Judges called this photo of a Siberian tiger a “scene like no other” and declared it the overall winning entry in the Wildlife Photographer Of The Year competition. See all the winning photos

Citizen scientists’ photos needed for Reef census

Divers photograph coral as part of the Great Reef Census launch at Milln Reef off Cairns.  PICTURE: CITIZENS OF THE GREAT BARRIER REEF
environment

A fleet of fishing and tourist boats, yachts and research ships with citizen scientists on board equipped with snorkels and cameras is completing a world-first study of the Great Barrier Reef

Wild devils return to mainland after 3000 years

This undated handout photo released by Aussie Ark on October 1, 2020 shows a Tasmanian devil walking in the wild in mainland Australia. - Tasmanian devils have been released into the wild on Australia's mainland 3,000 years after the feisty marsupials went extinct there, in what conservationists described on October 5 as a "historic" step. (Photo by Handout / Aussie Ark / AFP) / TO GO WITH AFP STORY Australia-environment-animal RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Aussie Ark" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS --- NO ARCHIVES ---
animals

After what’s believed to be thousands of years, there are once again wild Tasmanian devils on the Australian mainland, with 26 reintroduced so far in the Barrington Tops National Park, NSW

Calling all birders for big citizen science event

Bird - Fairy Wren in Song
science

It’s time for Australia’s largest citizen science event, the Aussie Backyard Bird Count. Last year, 88,000 people spotted almost 3.4 million birds in the annual avian survey. What birds can you see?

Bear back on duty for bushfire season

***EMBARGOED FOR FEB 26 NEWS USE ONLY***

Bear, the rescue and recovery dog as he searched for injured koalas in the wake of the Black Summer bushfires. Picture: Supplied/Foxtel
animals

This summer, Australian scientists will use a crew of sniffer dogs led by Bear, a border collie and Australian cattle dog cross, to find and rescue any koalas in danger from bushfires

What will you name the sea-lion pup?

****EMBARGOED UNTIL TUESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER****
Taronga Zoo welcome the arrival of a female Australian Sea Lion pup born on July 29 to mum Nala, pictured getting used to the surroundings before being introduced to the public. Picture: Toby Zerna
animals

Zookeepers need your help to name a very special endangered Australian sea-lion pup who made her first public splash this week. Fewer than 25 pups are born in the wild each year

How do bees make honey?

Close-up of a honey bee for Cameron England SAWeekend story. Picture: iStock
explainers

It’s spring! Plants everywhere are springing to life and flowering after winter. Bees are pretty excited, too, because flowers are vital for honey making. Kids News researched how bees make honey

Very rare ‘walking’ scorpion fish spotted on Reef

Scientists have viewed the deepest regions of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park
science

On an expedition by a robot to the depths of the Great Barrier Reef, scientists have found new species of black coral, sponges and a rare and awkward-looking “walking” scorpion fish

Tassie devil relative returns from extinction

nationally threatened mulgara  at Ethabuka Reserve. Brian Williams story.
animals

This tiny carnivorous marsupial was thought to be wiped out in NSW a century ago, but now scientists have reintroduce a small population of mulgaras back into the wild

Scientists solve mystery of giant melting glacier

Thwaites glacier is said to be 'the most vulnerable place in Antarctica' Credit: AFP
environment

Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier — more than twice as big as Tasmania — is melting from below, putting it at risk of collapse. Scientists now know warm water flowing beneath it is to blame

Famous aquanaut plans undersea human habitat

Proteus artist's illustration side view
environment

Fabien Cousteau, grandson of the great oceanographer Jacques Cousteau, is building an underwater living and working space for humans to help us better understand oceans and climate change

Inside the shark tank at Sea Life Aquarium

BOND MELBOURNE : for Peter Rolfe story   ..  10/08/2011 NEWS: 10/08/2011 NEWS: Feeding time at the Melbourne Aquarium. Senior diver Kate McKay feeds Mitch the grey nurse shark. Pic. Jay Town Pic. Jay Town
animals

They might look scary but few sharks deserve their fearsome reputation, according to aquarist James Gilbert. In fact, some need our help to survive on National Threatened Species Day.

Nature’s fury and beauty captured in winning photos

7PM, 27TH AUGUST 2020 EMBARGO FOR ONLINE, EMBARGO FOR PRINT 28TH AUGUST 2020, PREMIUM NETWORK CONTENT, NO AUSTRALIAN, NO NEWS.COM, NO SKY, NO WEST AUS, *ONLY FOR NEWS CORP MASTHEAD PAPERS*,  Overall Winner (originally Landscape) Ben Blanche.
A fire caused by a lightning strike in Mount Barney National Park.
It slowly marched over the peak as it moved around the border area of Queensland and New South Wales.
arts

A snap of a Black Summer bushfire has been named Australia’s best nature photograph in a competition that celebrates the country’s wild side

How cold was it in the coldest part of the Ice Age?

Two mammoth in a field covered of snow, with some bushes and a few bisons. Blue sky with clouds in the background.
weather

Scientists have calculated just how cold it got on Earth during the coldest part of the last Ice Age, using ocean plankton fossils and climate models

World-first parachute jump from solar plane

TOPSHOT - Initiator of sun-powered stratospheric SolarStratos plane project Raphael Domjan jumps during a successful world record attempt by jumping with a parachute from a solar-powered plane on August 25, 2020 in Payerne, western Switzerland. - The SolarStratos, a sleek, white, two-seater aircraft with long wings, covered with 22 square metres (237 square feet) of solar panels is set to become the first manned solar plane to make a stratospheric flight, according to Raphael Domjan, who is behind the project. (Photo by LAURENT GILLIERON / AFP)
environment

Inventors working to one day fly a solar-powered plane to the edge of space have performed the first jump and free fall from an electric aircraft

Big welcome for endangered baby animals

Kala with her newborn infant gorilla. Picture: Bristol ZooSource:Supplied
animals

Zookeepers announce the arrival of a baby critically endangered western lowland gorilla, twin golden lion tamarins and a giant panda as big as a chocolate bar in a great week for conservation

Hope for gold at the end of the tunnel

preliminary work a kilometre underground in a Stawell gold mine in the search for the universe's elusive 'dark matter'. The yellow container is an emergency oxygen supply.Need to be credited "image courtesy Swinburne University".
money

Victoria is on the verge of a second gold rush fuelled by gold’s high world price and modern mining methods, with hopes the precious metal will help the state recover after COVID-19

Coral recovery hope for Great Barrier Reef

Pictures for the AIMS Annual Summary Report on the Great Barrier Reef.
environment

The Great Barrier Reef is fighting back, with new research showing “encouraging” signs of coral growth in two-thirds of 86 monitored reefs

Animals with superpowers need your help

Finley (11) and Cohen (9) Howland playing the ANiMOZ Trading Card Game with Kinta the Quokka on August 11, 2020 at the Adelaide Zoo. Picture Matt Turner.
animals

Did you know that Australia’s critically endangered animals each have a superpower? Nominate your favourite animal to appear on a trading card that could help save them from extinction

Winning photos focus on wonders of science

2020 Beaker Street Science Photo Prize finalists. Tasmanian devil joeys being checked by researcher in mothers pouch.Picture: Heath Holden
science

An image of tiny Tasmanian devil joeys inside their mother’s pouch is a finalist in a photo competition shining a light on the importance of science for National Science Week

World temperature record set at Death Valley

DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, CALIFORNIA - AUGUST 17: Visitors walk near a sign warning of extreme heat danger on August 17, 2020 in Death Valley National Park, California. The temperature reached 130 degrees at Death Valley National Park on August 16, hitting what may be the hottest temperature recorded on Earth since at least 1913, according to the National Weather Service. Park visitors have been warned, ‘Travel prepared to survive.’   Mario Tama/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
weather

One of the hottest air temperatures recorded anywhere on Earth in at least a century, and possibly ever, was reached on Sunday afternoon at Death Valley in the US, where it soared to 54.4C

Seed bank saving rare native plants from bushfire threat

Seed Vault at Australian PlantBank. The Australian PlantBank is located at the Australian Botanic Garden Mount Annan and is the largest native seed bank in Australia and one of the largest in the world, helping to protect Australia’s precious 25,000 native plant species from the threats of extinction. The goal of PlantBank is to collect store and study viable seeds or live tissue specimens of all plant species in Australia.  Photo:The Australian PlantBank.
science

The race is on to collect rare plant seeds and protect species from extinction at Australia’s own version of the “doomsday vault”. It’s one way science is helping our environment this National Science Week

Volcano on Pacific Ring of Fire erupts

TOPSHOT - Mount Sinabung spews thick ash and smoke into the sky in Karo, North Sumatra on August 10, 2020. (Photo by Anto Sembiring / AFP)
geography

Indonesia’s Mount Sinabung has erupted, sending ash 5km into the sky. It’s the latest eruption along the 40,000km-long line of volcanoes, faults and trenches called the Pacific Ring of Fire

Penguin poop images from space reveal new Antarctic colonies

The smudges on the ice show the existence of an emperor penguin colony. Image taken from the European Commission’s Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite
animals

New satellite images of emperor penguin droppings have revealed a surprising number of colonies in Antarctica, where the flightless birds are under threat from global warming

Plastic waste found in seafood

Francisca Ribeiro and her team of UQ researchers discovers alarming levels of microplastic in seafood.
environment

Researchers have discovered alarming levels of microplastics in sardines, prawns, oysters and crabs

Australia’s famous tree-kangaroo becomes a dad

Nupela gave birth earlier this year on 4 February and her care team witnessed the baby crawl into the safety of mum’s pouch. Although a first-time mother, Nupela is a natural and her instincts see her regularly cleaning her pouch and grooming her little one who is growing fast. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE
animals

Makaia, an endangered Goodfellow’s tree-kangaroo, made news as a tiny orphaned joey when he was kept alive in the pouch of another species. He’s now all grown up and has become a dad

Heatwave Harry? Naming the threat may save lives

TOPSHOT - A woman looks through the glass of the enclosure of a Polar bear as he cools off in the water at the zoo in Mulhouse on August 3, 2018, as parts of Europe continue to swelter in an ongoing heatwave.    / AFP PHOTO / SEBASTIEN BOZON
weather

Giving heatwaves names and strength ratings, as for cyclones, could help people in hot places such as Australia understand how dangerous they are, particularly as heatwaves worsen in future

Hole in dam wall saves epic eel journey

P1290288
environment

Eels in Tasmania can now swim through a hole drilled in a dam wall to help them begin their incredible 3000km migration north to breeding grounds in the Coral Sea around New Caledonia

Plan to save Australian honey bees

Generic image of a Australian native honey bee seen at Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney, with news scientists have worked out how bees fly.
technology

New Aussie technology could halt one of the 21st century’s most troubling trends: the sudden decline in bee populations around the world

KFC plans to 3D print chicken nuggets

Want nerves with that? Picture: Thinkstock
science

A fast-food chicken chain is creating lab-grown meat made from stem cells to create a “meat for the future”, as a burger chain feeds cattle lemongrass to try to cut methane emissions

Bushfires threaten 49 Australian species

Embargoed for The Sunday Telegraph. Speak to the pictured desk before use.  Aussie Ark in the Barrington Tops is NSW’s largest independently owned and operated conservation organisation and is home to seven keystone species once found in the region. It's aim is to establish a robust insurance population of Australian threatened, native mammal species such as the Tasmanian devil, Eastern quoll and long-nosed potoroo, suitable for semi-wild release into large, predator proof fenced sanctuaries in the Barrington Tops, for eventual reintroduction to the wild.
animals

Scientists are just beginning to understand how the bushfires devastated populations of native animals. See the full list of species that are now – suddenly – under threat

‘Whisper-quiet’ hybrid jet design revealed

British inventors have unveiled a hybrid airplane that can be used for commercial passenger or cargo flights Credit: EAG
technology

Aeroplane designers are working on projects that could have us flying around in eco-friendly, almost-silent, battery-powered jets or sleek blended-wing aircraft like military stealth bombers

Calls to better protect world-famous giant cuttlefish site

Giant Australian Cuttlefish aggregation  off the coast of Whyalla in the Spencer Gulf  - picture Scott Portelli
animals

Pressure is mounting on the SA government to reverse a decision allowing fishing of giant cuttlefish in the Spencer Gulf, where they mass each year to spawn, the only place in the world this happens

Big buzz about Aussie bee drone invention

University of Adelaide mechanical engineering students, William Foster-Hall and James Cartwright with their proto type Pollination Drone Wednesday June 24,2020.Picture Mark Brake
technology

A team of mechanical engineering students in South Australia has invented a small drone that transfers pollen from plant to plant and that could one day replace bees

Huge outback station to become national park

This undated handout from the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Services released on June 27, 2020 shows a grey grasswren at Narriearra Station, a 153,415-hectare (379,000 acres) property in Australia's far northwest New South Wales. - A slice of Australian outback almost the size of greater London will be turned into a national park to help protect threatened species after authorities bought the land on June 27, 2020. (Photo by Jeff HARDY / NSW NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICES / AFP) / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NSW NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICES/JEFF HARDY " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  - NO ARCHIVE
environment

The NSW government has bought more than 1500 square kilometres of the state for a new national park to protect 25 threatened animal species and important habitat

Why don’t you sink in the Dead Sea?

ESCAPE:  Woman with sun hat holding and reading a newspaper while lying on back with crossed feet, floating in salty water of Dead Sea, Israel, Middle East.  Picture: Istock
explainers

Ask people what they know about the Dead Sea and most will tell you that it’s impossible to sink when you’re swimming in it, but not everyone knows why. Kids News did some research

Endangered dunnart found alive after fires

animals

A tiny, critically endangered marsupial has amazed conservationists on Kangaroo Island, after being spotted scampering in bushland destroyed in bushfires

Happy day as Bear the turtle swims home

Sea Life Sydney welcome three turtles to the Darling Harbour aquarium for the first time after the closure of Manly Sea Life Sanctuary. Green Sea Turtle Myrtle was rescued Sea Life in 2013 and has been fitted with metal plates to help her swim following a boat accident that left her with cracks in her shell. Supplied
animals

Carers at a Queensland aquarium waved a happy goodbye this week to a precious green sea turtle, who swam back to freedom after recovering in captivity from injury

The mystery of sea creatures’ snot palaces

This 2002 photo provided by the Monterrey Bay Aquarium Research Institute shows a close up view of a "giant larvacean" and its "inner house" - a mucus filter that the animal uses to collect food. The creature, usually three to ten centimeters (about one to four inches) in length, builds a huge mucous structure that functions as an elaborate feeding apparatus, guiding food particles into the animal's mouth. When the filters get clogged, the larvacean abandons them. The abandoned filters sink toward the seafloor, and become an important food source for other marine animals. (MBARI via AP)
science

Learning how sea creatures build the equivalent of five-story palaces in about an hour, made just with mucus from their heads, could help us build expanding homes on Earth, the Moon or Mars

Coral transplants to boost reef health

Emma Camp, Project area: Australia. Reef recovery: pioneering new hope for the world's fast-vanishing corals
environment

Divers are using the quiet pandemic period to grow and replant coral at popular tourist diving and snorkelling spots on the Great Barrier Reef.

Burnt koalas heal with Phillip Island penguins

Ranger Jess McKelson. For Kids News and Hibernation
environment

Phillip Island reopens on World Environment Day as Ranger Jess McKelson shares tales of bushfire koalas and little penguins

Young minds rise to the challenge

smart kid, thinker. iStock image. For Kids News Hibernation story on Westpac Youth Impact Challenge
humanities

They might be young but they’re thinking big. Find out how the Westpac Youth Impact Challenge is inspiring kid entrepreneurs who want to make the world a better place

Australia set for colder, wetter than average winter

A few spots of rain overnight and this morning may bring hope to some . Puddles at the Opera House .picture John Grainger
weather

Get your umbrella and winter woollies out. The Bureau of Meteorology is tipping plenty of rain and chilly days ahead but nights could be warmer.

Australian megafauna died out with climate change

Megafauna , Billabong scene
environment

Giant kangaroos, enormous crocodiles, massive wombats and a marsupial “lion” that lived 40,000 years ago in tropical Northern Australia died out because of climate change, a study has found

Big boost to birdwing butterflies in the wild

The Richmond Birdwing Butterfly.
animals

A successful captive breeding and release program of more than 500 Richmond birdwing butterflies means the species could soon be taken off the threatened species list

Climbers to remeasure height of Everest

In this May 16, 2020 aerial photo released by Xinhua News Agency, Chinese surveyors hike toward a higher spot from the base camp on Mount Qomolangma at an altitude of 5,200 meters. The Chinese government-backed team plans to summit Mount Everest this week at a time when the world's tallest peak has been closed to commercial climbers. (Jigme Dorje/Xinhua via AP)
geography

A team of climbers is on its way to summit Mount Everest this week to measure whether it has grown as Earth’s tectonic plates move and try to end international disagreement on the subject

Isolation baby boom for Australian zoos

Tree Kangaroo joey Chimbu exploring with mum Mani
Healesville Sanctuary. Picture: Zoos Victoria
animals

While the world has been in lockdown, zoos around the country have been welcoming a wave of cute, cuddly and not so cuddly babies. Check them out.

Ball of cuteness and other winning nature photos

Mountain Hare Lepus timidus A confiding adult, high in the Cairngorms mountains, forms the shape of a ball as it grooms Cairngorms National Park, Scotland, UK
arts

A photo of a mountain hare in a snowstorm that took the photographer several freezing weeks to capture has won this year’s BigPicture international nature photography competition

Mystery of koala drinking habits solved

A supplied image obtained on Saturday, May 2, 2020, of a wild koala licking a tree after rain. A study published today in Ethology, led by a researcher from The University of Sydney, has captured koala drinking behaviour in the wild for the first time. (AAP Image/Supplied by The University of Sydney) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
animals

In a big win in the battle to save this species from extinction, scientists have observed koalas drinking in the wild for the first time, watching them lick rain running down tree trunks

Sea turtles thrive as humans stay off our beaches

ESCAPE:  Close-up of baby olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea), also known as the Pacific ridley, on beach sand. Selective focus on baby turtle. Picture: Istock
animals

Sea turtles are nesting in record numbers across the world as humans stay inside to stop the spread of COVID-19. The turtles are thriving with crowd-free beaches and less pollution

Found! Antarctic frog fossils from warmer times

Dr Jodi Rowley with James Alcock
animals

Experts have discovered cold-blooded frogs once lived on a warm Antarctica 40 million years ago PLUS Australian scientists need your help for a frog-finding mission closer to home

Earth’s insect numbers shrink over 30 years

Funny laughing curly girl with a butterfly on his nose. Healthy smile with white teeth. Free breathing concept.
animals

New scientific research has shown the number of insects living on land has fallen dramatically in the past 30 years, putting the world’s ecosystems — and human lives — at risk

Koalas at risk as numbers halve in 20 years

Poppy is the daughter of the lovely Rusa, who is a wonderful mum but unfortunately isnÕt producing quite enough milk to support her growing baby.

To help Poppy along, she receives a milk feed twice a day from Keeper Karen (in this video) or our head vet, Dr. Galit.

Being little Miss Independent, Poppy likes to try and hold the syringe to feed herself. If it wasnÕt for Keeper Karen steadying the pace, she would eat way too much before she realises her tummy is full!
animals

Australia’s koala population has been cut in half in the past two decades, with conservationists warning our national icon is already extinct in some areas after devastating bushfires and drought

Painting clouds and other ideas to save our Reef

This undated handout photo received on April 6, 2020 from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, shows coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. - Australia's Great Barrier Reef has suffered its most widespread coral bleaching on record, scientists said on April 7, 2020 in a dire warning about the threat posed by climate change to the world's largest living organism. James Cook University professor Terry Hughes said a comprehensive survey last month found record sea temperatures had caused the third mass bleaching of the 2,300-kilometre (1,400-mile) reef system in just five years. (Photo by Handout / JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY AUSTRALIA / AFP) / TO BE USED EXCLUSIVELY FOR AFP STORY AUSTRALIA-ENVIRONMENT-CLIMATE-REEF RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - NO ARCHIVE /
environment

Action on climate change and ideas such as painting clouds with water and growing heat-tolerant coral are being considered to help the Great Barrier Reef be healthier in 30 years’ time

Procession of caterpillars sign of frosty time ahead

The procession of caterpillars. Picture: Still from video
animals

A 7m-long procession of caterpillars parading through Alice Springs is fascinating and touching them dangerous, but to the Arrernte people, it can be a sign of a harsh winter on the way

Scientists to make the Murray River sing

The Helping the Murray Sing project. Picture: Jason Macqueen
science

The sounds of Australia’s Murray River will soon be heard in song after scientists and audio specialists captured its sights and sounds in a project aimed at improving the waterway’s health

Wild beasts come out to play as humans stay in

LLANDUDNO, WALES - MARCH 31: Mountain goats roam the streets of LLandudno on March 31, 2020 in Llandudno, Wales. The goats normally live on the rocky Great Orme but are occasional visitors to the seaside town, but a local councillor told the BBC that the herd was drawn this time by the lack of people and tourists due to the COVID-19 outbreak and quarantine measures. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
animals

Wild animals including jaguars, goats and boars have started exploring quiet city streets across the world as humans stay inside during the coronavirus lockdown

Baby boom for endangered snapping turtles

Taronga Zoo have had success breeding the critically endangered Bellinger River Snapping Turtle, a species that was almost wiped out by a disease in 2015. This year over 35 babies have hatched in their breeding facility. Picture: Toby Zerna
animals

The future of Australia’s critically endangered Bellinger River snapping turtle is a little more secure after 35 baby turtles hatched at Taronga Zoo

Twin polar bear cubs venture out in empty zoo

In this image released by Ouwehands Zoo Rhenen on Wednesday March 18, 2020, a pair of polar bear twins make their public debut at a Dutch zoo, without public because of coronavirus restrictions. The two youngsters cautiously ventured out of the maternity den at the Ouwehands Zoo on Wednesday morning, sticking close to their mother, called Freedom, as they explored their outdoor enclosure for the first time since they were born on Nov. 27.  (Tonny Hoevers, Ouwehands Zoo Rhenen via AP)
animals

Three-and-a-half-month-old twin polar bear cubs have made their public debut at a zoo in the Netherlands, but without the public because of coronavirus restrictions

Lego lost at sea could survive 1300 years

Millions of pieces of Lego are still washing up on Cornish coastlines - 23 years after first becoming lost at sea. During stormy weather on February 13, 1997, a Tokio Express container ship was hit by a massive wave about 20 miles from Land’s End. Source - https://www.facebook.com/yourshoreplastic/
environment

Scientists studying plastic Lego blocks lost in a storm then washed up on the coast of southwest England find they could survive in the ocean for 1300 years

Why do leaves change colour and fall in autumn?

HOLD FOR HERALD SUN. CONTACT PIC DESK BEFORE USING Sarah (10) and Charlotte (7) Williams enjoying the Autumn leaves in Honour Avenue, Macedon.
Picture: Jay Town
explainers

The leaves on deciduous trees turn forests, parks and gardens a rainbow of yellows, oranges, reds and browns. Why do leaves change colour? And why do the trees let them fall?

Tasmania considers culling wild kookaburras

Two kookaburras picture at Tangalooma Resort, Moreton Island, Queensland. Credit: Tangalooma Resort's facebook
animals

Tasmania is considering culling kookaburras in the wild after populations of the iconic national bird have spread and are threatening the future of other native species

Very hungry caterpillar eats Earth’s plastic pollution

A handout picture released by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) shows a moth caterpillar on a plastic bag during a scientific experiment in Santander on April 17, 2017. A moth caterpillar commonly bred to provide fish bait feasts on a notoriously resistant plastic, scientists reported on April 24, 2017, raising hopes the creature can help manage the global problem of plastic-bag pollution. / AFP PHOTO / CSIC / Cesar HERNANDEZ / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / CSIC / CESAR HERNANDEZ - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
science

Scientists have been feeding waxworms polyethylene — one of the most common plastics used in shopping bags — and found that just 60 little caterpillars can eat more than 30 sqcm in a week

Underwater Photographer of the Year

HIGHLY COMMENDED Category 4. Behaviour

Credit name: Alex Kydd/UPY 2019
Nationality: Australia
Image caption: A Fever of Cownose Rays
Country taken: Australia
Location: Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia
Camera make: NikonD810
Lens: Sigma 15mm f/2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye Lens
ISO: 320
Aperture: f/9
Shutter: 1/250
Lighting used: Natural light
Housing: Aquatica Digital

Back story printed: 
A rare encounter with a fever of cownose rays on the Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia. This was a once in a lifetime encounter with a species that is rarely documented in this region. We unexpectedly came across the rays whilst searching for whale sharks. The rays were spiralling up and down the water column from the surface to 20 meters for a brief moment until they disappeared into the deep. The images were taken whilst freediving to approximately 6 metres. The rays were circling and rubbing together in a behaviour that is still not clearly understood. It may have been possible mating or a social behaviour. The exact species of ray is still debated, it is either Rhinoptera javanica or Rhinoptera neglecta. 

Judge's comments: 
A top down camera angle on the rays has captured the behaviour perfectly.  The balance of all four sides keeps the eye of the viewer contained within the frame.  It's not too tight either, just the right amount of space to admire the spectacle. - Martin Edge
arts

Five Australian photographers have blitzed the international Underwater Photographer of the Year competition with their incredible pictures of life under the sea

Australia’s long, hot summers the new normal

HEATWAVE: NSW is predicted to experience a severe heatwave during a four-day Total Fire Ban up to December 21, 2019 and authorities warn people to be prepared..
weather

Our summers are now twice as long as our winters as climate change has increased temperatures since the middle of last century, according to a new study of Australian weather data

Would you eat butter made from maggots?

buttering toast with knife
environment

Scientists in Belgium are experimenting with larva fat to replace butter in waffles, cakes and cookies, saying using grease from insects is more sustainable than dairy produce

It’s peak-hour traffic to put the bins out

Mark Knight cartoon on bin night.
arts

In his weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight looks at how waste management has become a major issue in Australia and why it’s soon to create peak-hour traffic on bin night

Bird’s-eye view of our beautiful planet Earth

Google Earth satellite images from space
geography

Google has added 1000 new images to Earth View – a collection of the most beautiful landscapes from Google Earth. And a farmer’s marriage proposal makes it onto Google Maps

Antarctica’s hottest day ever recorded

FILE - In this undated file photo, a lonely penguin appears in Antarctica during the southern hemisphere's summer season. The temperature in northern Antarctica hit nearly 65 degrees (18.3 degrees Celsius), a likely heat record on the continent best known for snow, ice, and penguins. The reading was taken Thursday, Feb. 5, 2020 at an Argentine research base and still needs to be verified by the World Meteorological Organization. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Jana, File)
weather

The temperature in northern Antarctica has hit 18.3C, thought to be a heat record on the continent best known for snow, ice and penguins

Children race llamas to save World Heritage park

A child sits on a llama before racing it in Los Llanganates, National Park, Ecuador, Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020. Wooly llamas, an animal emblematic of the Andean mountains in South America, become the star for a day each year when Ecuadoreans dress up their prized animals for children to ride them in 500-meter races. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
environment

Risking injury and braving the cold, children as young as four race llamas across a high-altitude region of Ecuador each year to help save one of the most important wetlands on Earth

Panama disease found on Queensland banana farm

Bananas. Generic photo of bananas on shelf.
news

A fungus that can wipe out banana crops has been found on a farm in far north Queensland in a region that produces 90 per cent of Australia’s bananas

Keeping drinking water safe after fires

South Burnett Regional Council will be isolating the Wooroolin water supply for required maintenance today.
environment

Water experts are preparing to keep Australia’s drinking water clean after bushfires, including installing huge fabric curtains across Sydney’s main dam

Scientists urge action to save platypus

Baby zoo animals spread. Healesville Sanctuary. Platypus keeper Jessica Thomas with little Ember, named after the local bushfires.
animals

Platypus populations are on the brink of extinction from drought, land clearing and the way we manage our waterways, according to new research on this unique Australian icon

Out-of-control bushfire burns one-fifth of ACT

The coastal area around Rainbow Flat was once again under threat.Firefighters fought intense fires to protest lives and property. Picture Gary Ramage
environment

A raging megablaze has burnt one-fifth of the Australian Capital Territory as out-of-control bushfires also continue to threaten homes in NSW and Victoria

Aussie schoolkids inventing the future

Lawsona and Gabrielle with their Aquerator invention
technology

A robotic aerator to save river fish, a voice app to help people living with dementia and a photo-recognition app that sorts rubbish have been named Australia’s top student inventions

Greta named Person of the Year for 2019

This handout image released on December 11, 2019 courtesy of Time shows the Time person of the Year December 23/December 30, 2019 cover with Greta Thunberg. - Greta Thunberg, the Swedish teenager who became the voice of conscience for a generation facing the climate change emergency, was announced December 11, 2019 as Time magazine's 2019 Person of the Year. The 16-year-old first hit the headlines for her solo strike against global warming outside Sweden's parliament last year."We can't just continue living as if there was no tomorrow, because there is a tomorrow. That is all we are saying," Thunberg told Time. (Photo by Evgenia ARBUGAEVA / TIME / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /EVGENIA ARBUGAEVA FOR TIME " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
humanities

Swedish schoolgirl activist Greta Thunberg who became a household name after encouraging 4 million people to strike over climate change is named Time Magazine’s Person of the Year

Woman trapped in mountain of ‘cornflake’ algae

Kai, 13, Cruz, 10, Beau, 8 and Lola Colless, 5, playing in the mass of seaweed which washed up on Palm Beach. Photo: Brooke Colless
weather

Seaweed piled high on Queensland beaches has trapped at least one runner, who had to be rescued from the algae. While seaweed is not unusual, people have never seen so much at once

Drones deliver baby coral to save Reef

Supplied image of the resettling millions of coral babies back onto the Great Barrier Reef, using underwater robots and large larval clouds. Photo - Juergen Freund
science

Scientists with an army of robotic drones and a fleet of backpack-sized inflatable pools are working to save the Great Barrier Reef as part of the world’s largest science and tourism group project

Row, row, row your boat to a better world

Mark Knight cartoon on Greta Thunberg.
arts

In our weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight explains why he drew young climate change activist Greta Thunberg rowing rock band Coldplay to their next world gig

Record floods swamp historic Venice

TOPSHOT - A woman  crosses the flooded St. Mark's squareby St. Mark's Basilica after an exceptional overnight "Alta Acqua" high tide water level, early on November 13, 2019 in Venice. - Powerful rainstorms hit Italy on November 12, with the worst affected areas in the south and Venice, where there was widespread flooding. Within a cyclone that threatens the country, exceptional high water were rising in Venice, with the sirocco winds blowing northwards from the Adriatic sea against the lagoon’s outlets and preventing the water from flowing back into the sea. At 22:40pm the tide reached 183 cm, the second measure in history after the 198 cm of the 1966 flood. (Photo by Marco Bertorello / AFP)
weather

UNESCO World Heritage Site Venice is in a state of emergency after “apocalyptic” floods swept through the historic Italian city, with the mayor blaming climate change

Hell on earth as weather giants collide

Mark Knight cartoon on the bushfires in Queensland and NSW
arts

In our weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight captures the helplessness of drought-affected Australian communities now caught in the path of catastrophic bushfires

Ice eggs cover beach in rare weather event

The extraordinary sight was captured on Hailuoto Island in Finland. Picture: Risto Mattila
weather

Ice eggs the size of footballs have engulfed an entire beach in Finland in a rare weather event that requires ice, wind, water and freezing temperatures

World’s scientists unite on climate

Climate protesters gather across the street from the New York County Courthouse, where the Exxon Mobil trial is taking place, November 1, 2019 in New York. (Photo by Don Emmert / AFP)
environment

More than 11,000 scientists have signed a declaration warning of a climate emergency and offered six clear measures they believe could avoid “untold human suffering”

Fight on over futuristic hi-tech city

A view of the planned city by Sidewalk Labs
technology

Google is trying to get everyone to agree on its plans to redevelop a neglected piece of land to build a hi-tech city complete with heated footpaths and self-driving shuttles

Dreaming of an Uluru without climbers

Mark Knight cartoon on final day of being able to climb Uluru
news

In our weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight explains why he drew Uluru as an indigenous character dreaming of a life without interference on spiritual land

Small town strikes it lucky in big dry

Holding a water rubber hose tube. Watering
weather

Tenterfield — battling drought and, recently, bushfires — has struck it lucky with the discovery of underground water only 126 days before the town’s supply was due to run dry

The most amazing wildlife photos of the year

Yongqing Bao won the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 title for this image taken in the Chinese province of Qinghai. Called The Moment, it pictures a standoff between a Tibetan fox and a marmot, which seems frozen in fear. Chair of the judging panel, Roz Kidman Cox, says, 'Photographically, it is quite simply the perfect moment. The expressive intensity of the postures holds you transfixed, and the thread of energy between the raised paws seems to hold the protagonists in perfect balance' MUST CREDIT Photographers name/ Wildlife Photographer of the Year
animals

A gripping action shot that captures “the perfect moment” between a Tibetan fox and a marmot has won its photographer the title of Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Rye straw could replace plastic straws

Making bio-degradable straws from Rye plant - developer and co-owner Marion Vigot photographed at Waite Institute with Rye and Rye straws Friday October 11, 2019 - pic AAP/MIKE BURTON
environment

Australian farmers are growing millions of natural, no-waste alternatives to plastic drinking straws every year, yet few people know about this centuries-old invention

Protesting extinction is as old as the dinosaurs

Mark Knight cartoon on Extinction Rebellion
animals

In our weekly series, award-winning cartoonist Mark Knight looks at the Extinction Rebellion protests in Australia and around the world and wonders what the dinosaurs would have thought

Space burgers coming right up!

Gold Coast Bulletin - Great eats - November 2017


burger on wax paper with beer in background on rustic wooden painted table.
science

Astronauts have grown beef in a laboratory up on the International Space Station by 3D printing meat from cells harvested on Earth and sent up into orbit on a rocket

Where have all the Bogong moths gone?

These Pygmy Possums need names! Picture- Nicole Cleary
animals

Critically endangered mountain pygmy-possums need your help to solve the mystery of the missing Bogong moths that have disappeared somewhere between Queensland and Victoria

Australia’s critical water shortage

Calls for water infrastructure reform.
weather

Several NSW towns will run out of drinking water within weeks without rain. In the longer term, Australia needs to build more dams to supply our growing population

Drought leaves firefighters without water

A supplied image obtained on Sunday, September 8, 2019, of firefighters from Fire and Rescue NSW, Station 302 Glen Innes as they attend to a bushfire in Tenterfield, NSW. (AAP Image/Supplied by Fire and Rescue NSW, Station 302 Glen Innes) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
environment

Fires continued to burn across drought-ravaged Queensland and New South Wales on Monday night, forcing firefighters to find ways to fight bushfires without water