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Wonderful wildlife on show for Sony World Photography Awards 2020

Zoe Smith, March 18, 2020 8:00AM News Corp Australia Network

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“Video to Jacks” of a school of Jack fish swimming towards the diver, who was taking video. Picture: Kam Moon Lai, Hong Kong, 2nd Place, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards media_camera“Video to Jacks” of a school of Jack fish swimming towards the diver, who was taking video. Picture: Kam Moon Lai, Hong Kong, 2nd Place, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

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Photos of a giraffe’s bottom, a monkey deep in thought, a hunting eagle with its handler and a kookaburra surveying the burned forest have each taken out awards in the prestigious* Sony World Photography Awards 2020.

The images – captured by Marcus Westberg, of Sweden, Jan Simon, of Czech Republic, Kyaw Bo Bo Han, of Myanmar, and Adam Stevenson, of NSW, Australia – are winners in the contest’s National Awards, which aims to support photographers across 63 countries and regions.

media_camera“Young Eagle Hunter”, taken in Olgii Provinces, Mongolia. Picture: Kyaw Bo Bo Han, Myanmar, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards
media_camera“Wondering monkey”, taken in Indonesia in a place called Monkey Forest. Picture: Jan Simon, Czech Republic, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

One photographer from each nation was honoured for one stand-alone image.

Mr Westberg said he had to spend several days in a hide* in Onguma Private Reserve, near Etosha, Namibia, to capture his image of wildlife at a waterhole.

“I knew if I was patient enough I would have a good chance of photographing giraffes as they came in to drink, but I never imagined any of them would squeeze in between the hide and the waterhole! This presented me with a different perspective than I had envisioned*.

“Patience, and a willingness to sit quietly in nature is often reward in itself – although in this case I was delighted to leave with an image like this.”

media_camera“Spread’em”, taken in Onguma Private Reserve, near Etosha, Namibia. Picture: Marcus Westberg, Sweden, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

A winner closer to home was photographer Adam Stevenson’s entry and image of a kookaburra surveying* the sweeping devastation of the NSW bushfires.

The image was taken with an iPhone X near his home at Wallabi Point.

Stevenson called the picture – one of over 345,000 images entered in the contest – ‘That’s Nothing to Laugh About’.

He said: “As I watched the sun set through the smoke, a kookaburra appeared and allowed me to walk right up to it. We shared a moment, watching the sun fade behind the apocalyptic* scene … he was laughing.”

media_camera“That’s Nothing to Laugh About” taken close to the photographer’s home at Wallabi Point, NSW, winner of the Australian National Award. Picture: Adam Stevenson, Australia, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Other winners in the National Awards include Roberto Corinaldesi’s picture of swimmers from above, Tien Sang Kok’s picture of a hundred horses galloping, Abbas Alkhamis’ image of a horse breeder and horse in Abu Dhabi and Lakshitha Karunarathna’s stunning picture of a Eurasian otter in the waters near Bourne in Lincolnshire, UK.

The overall winner of the Photographer of the Year 2020 title will be announced on April 16.

media_camera“Descend From Above” shows hundred of horses galloping when the sun is about to shine its last ray. “It is traditionally said that a Mongol without a horse is like a bird without a wing, this is how strong the bond between human being and animal that we should appreciate,” wrote the photographer. Picture: Tien Sang Kok, Malaysia, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards
media_camera“Sur La Mer”. Picture: Roberto Corinaldesi, Italy, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards
media_camera“Horse Motion” shows a horse breeder with a horse from a stable in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Picture: Abbas Alkhamis, Saudi Arabia, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards
media_camera“Splasher”. The photographer wrote: “As I spent a whole night photographing a heron in a small pond, close to Bourne in Lincolnshire, this handsome hunter popped up all of sudden, right in front of me and started swimming and diving for fish, at an unbelievable pace. I could not get a proper shot for some time, due to the speed and the unpredictability of this skilful night hunter. After good half an hour of hunting, it took a break and shook the water off and I did not miss that moment where the Eurasian Otter is stand-still and the tiny water drops could be seen all-over the mammal. Picture: Lakshitha Karunarathna, Sri Lanka, Winner, National Awards, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

GLOSSARY

  • prestigious: well regarded; important
  • hide: a structure to hide in to watch wildlife
  • envisioned: imagined; saw in your mind
  • surveying: looking over
  • apocalyptic: like it’s the end of the world

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QUICK QUIZ

  1. Where did Marcus Westberg sit to take his photo? In what country?
  2. What type of camera did Adam Stevenson use?
  3. What is the name of the kookaburra photo and why is it called that?
  4. How many entries were there?
  5. Where was the photo of the otter taken?

LISTEN TO THIS STORY

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
1. Identify elements
Choose one of the photographs. Explain how the photographer has used any three of these elements listed below in their photograph. Try to choose the three elements that you think are most significant in the picture. (If you are unsure about what each of these elements means there are lots of resources available online that can help you.)

  • Line
  • Shape
  • Form
  • Space
  • Texture
  • Value
  • Colour

Discuss the photograph with a partner. Are there other elements they have noticed as being significant in the photograph that you had not identified.

Time: allow 20 minutes to complete this activity
Curriculum Links: English; Visual Arts

2. Extension
Identify something, someone or somewhere that you think would make a good photo subject. Explain why you have chosen this. Then, if a suitable device and your subject is available, take some photographs. If this is not possible, sketch what your photograph might look like.

Time: allow 20 minutes to complete this activity
Curriculum Links: English; Visual Arts

VCOP ACTIVITY
Description of the Senses
Pick one of the pictures from the gallery and use your senses to imagine you are the photographer taking the picture.

What do you see, hear, touch, taste, smell?

Write the description out in detail to share with a partner.

Ask them to close their eyes as you read so they can really start to create your imagery in their mind, like a movie or painting slowly being drawn.

Remember, the sense of ‘touch’ does not need to be with your hands, it’s anything you feel on any part of your body.

You also do not need to use the words, I see … etc. You can describe what you see and hide the sense word (show, don’t tell).

“Before me stood a majestic creature …” instead of “I see a majestic creature before me”.

HAVE YOUR SAY: Which photo do you like best?
No one-word answers. Use full sentences to explain your thinking. No comments will be published until approved by editors.

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