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Animals

One of the grasssland earless dragons at Melbourne Zoo. Picture: Zoos Victoria

Rare baby earless dragons ready for visitors

animals

Keepers at Melbourne Zoo have proudly introduced to visitors some baby grassland earless dragons. It’s been 50 years since the last confirmed Victorian sighting of the species in the wild

Pictured at Woollahra Public School are year 5 students Nina Vujovic , Alyla Browne and Tea McDrury.
The children at Woollahra Public School have been making pompoms for Christmas decorations to raise money fro the hundreds of koalas impacted by last summers bushfires.
Picture:Richard Dobson

Young fundraisers’ crafty idea to save koalas

humanities

Watching the devastation of Australia’s koalas during last summer’s bushfires was too much to bear for these nature-loving kids — so they are doing something about it

Owning a pet has many health benefits for kids. iStock image. For Kids News Hibernation

Dogs then cats top list of favourite pets

humanities

Australians love pets and our favourite pets are definitely dogs, according to the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey, which, for the first time, asked us about animals

Latest

Census to count every koala in bid to save species

Archer the Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park. Picture: Dylan Robinson
animals

The Environment Minister unveiled a $2 million koala count as part of government’s commitment to protect the endangered species, while scientists call for threatened status for the platypus

Predator-proof fence to create native wildlife haven

Moonlit Sanctuary Pearcedale.

'Quinnie' the 2 year old female 'Spot Tailed Quoll' who was hand reared after being abandoned by its mother at 2 months of age. 'Quinnie' is one of the animals involved in the sanctuary's 'Conservation in Action' show.

Picture: Jason Sammon

Monday 20 June 2016
environment

A 10km fence will be built at a Victorian national park to protect endangered species from predatory pests

First-ever Aussie sighting of bigfin squid

One of the Bigfin Squid found in the Great Australian Bight. The size of this squid coud not be determined due to poor visibilty. Picture: CSIRO
animals

Australian scientists have filmed five bigfin squid in the Great Australian Bight, the first time they’ve been seen in Australian waters. Little is known about these creatures of the deep

Time to wave goodbye to the peregrine chicks

The peregrine falcon chicks on November 12
animals

As Melburnians stretch their wings after the lockdown, the city’s famous peregrine falcon chicks are also stretching theirs, hopping and flying backwards and forwards along their home ledge

Gene study finds two new glider species

MUST CREDIT WWF AND PHOTOGRAPHER. Greater glider in a patch of old growth forest south of Brisbane. The light greater glider and dark greater glider that are filmed separately sticking their heads out of the same hollow are a breeding pair. Picture: Josh Bowell
animals

Australian scientists have discovered two new species of one of our cutest and most-loved native animals, the greater glider. What we previously thought was one species is actually three

Gigantic iceberg on collision course with island

Adolescent elephant seals are exceptionally engaging subjects. Elephant seals are found on many subantarctic islands such as South Georgia, as well as along parts of the Argentine coast. While the island supports limited vegetation and terrestrial life (75 percent of the island is under snow and ice), marine life is abundant.
environment

An iceberg the size of a small country is floating toward the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, raising fears seal and penguin parents won’t be able to access food or get back to their young

Mystery of the mass butterfly invasion

Butterflies A Caper White butterfly feeding on lantana flowers, Glasshouse Mountains,QLD
by Paul Francis,
Indooroopilly,
Mo 0400743885
animals

Hundreds of thousands of caper white butterflies have blown into Southeast Queensland in a phenomenon that only happens about every six to 10 years. Scientists can only speculate why

First for top dog handler

For the first time ever (since 1949), a woman has won the Tasmanian Working Sheep Dog State Championships. Carmen Blyth took out first place with her dog Somerville Spec. Camen with her sheep dogs Somerville Spec and Somerville Poppy. Picture: RICHARD JUPE
just for fun

Carmen Blyth — along with trusty dog Spec — has become the first female to win Tasmania’s Working Sheep Dog State Championships since the competition began in the 1940s

Echidna puggle in good hands after bumpy start

Taronga Wildlife Hospital senior keeper Sarah Male is hand-raising a pint-sized echidna puggle, rescued after being dropped from the sky by birds which snatched it from its burrow. For Kids News,
animals

Snatched from its burrow and dropped from the sky by a hungry bird, this little guy had a rough start to life. But things are looking up at Taronga Wildlife Hospital

Fox without socks takes a liking to shoes

Looking to hunt down a feral pest before it takes a greater toll on our local wildlife.
animals

In a twist on the Dr Seuss story, a cunning fox is collecting shoes — but not socks — from front verandas in Adelaide, spreading them around the streets and hoarding them in its den

Kurt the cloned horse kicking up his heels

This Sept. 1, 2020 photo provided by San Diego Zoo Global shows Kurt, a tiny horse who is actually a clone. Little Kurt looks like any other baby horse as he frolics playfully in his pen. But the 2-month-old, dun-colored colt was created by fusing cells taken from an endangered Przewalski's horse at the San Diego Zoo in 1980. The cells were infused with an egg from a domestic horse that gave birth to Kurt two months ago. The baby boy was named for Kurt Benirschke, a founder of the San Diego Zoo's Frozen Zoo, where thousands of cell cultures are stored. Scientists hope he'll help restore the Przewalski's population, which numbers only about 2,000. (Christine Simmons/San Diego Zoo Global via AP)
science

In a world first, scientists have cloned a rare, endangered Przewalski’s horse. They used cells taken from a stallion 40 years ago and fused them with an egg from a domestic horse

Tree-hugging tiger photo wins wildlife award

Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners announced -  The embrace by Sergey Gorshkov, Russia
Winner 2020, Animals in their Environment, GRAND TITLE WINNER

With an expression of sheer ecstasy, a tigress hugs an ancient Manchurian fir, rubbing her cheek against bark to leave secretions from her scent glands. She is an Amur, or Siberian, tiger, here in the Land of the Leopard National Park, in the Russian Far East. The race – now regarded as the same subspecies as the Bengal tiger – is found only in this region, with a small number surviving over the border in China and possibly a few in North Korea. Hunted almost to extinction in the past century, the population is still threatened by poaching and logging, which also impacts their prey – mostly deer and wild boar, which are also hunted. But recent (unpublished) camera‑trap surveys indicate that greater protection may have resulted in a population of possibly 500–600 – an increase that it is hoped a future formal census may confirm. Low prey densities mean that tiger territories are huge. Sergey knew his chances were slim but was determined to take a picture of the totem animal of his Siberian homeland. Scouring the forest for signs, focusing on trees along regular routes where tigers might have left messages – scent, hairs, urine or scratch marks – he installed his first proper camera trap in January 2019, opposite this grand fir. But it was not until November that he achieved the picture he had planned for, of a magnificent tigress in her Siberian forest environment.  

Nikon Z-7 + 50mm f1.8 lens; 1/200 sec at f6.3; ISO 250; Cognisys camera-trap system.
animals

Judges called this photo of a Siberian tiger a “scene like no other” and declared it the overall winning entry in the Wildlife Photographer Of The Year competition. See all the winning photos

Tardigrades found with glowing blue UV shield

A species of tardigrade that glows blue in UV light. Picture: Suma et al/Biology Letters
science

Scientists have discovered a new species of tardigrade with a new superpower — a blue fluorescent coating — that protects them and other living things it is painted onto against extreme UV light

Rat wins top bravery award for landmine work

TOPSHOT - An undated handout picture released by UK veterinary charity PDSA on September 25, 2020 shows Magawa, an African giant pouched rat wearing his gold medal received from PDSA for his work in detecting landmines in Siem Reap, Cambodia. (Photo by Handout / PDSA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /PDSA " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
animals

Magawa, a giant African pouched rat, is the first rat ever to win a British charity’s top civilian award for animal bravery, receiving the honour for searching out unexploded landmines in Cambodia

How do birds fly? Why can’t humans fly?

Taronga Zoo keepers are training one of their wedge tail eagles 'Reggie' at Athol Hall to be part of the Free Flight Bird Show. Picture: Toby Zerna
explainers

It’s spring and that means there are soon to be a lot of baby birds learning to fly. They look awkward first go, but they soon work it out. How do they do it? And why can’t humans fly too?

Wild devils return to mainland after 3000 years

This undated handout photo released by Aussie Ark on October 1, 2020 shows a Tasmanian devil walking in the wild in mainland Australia. - Tasmanian devils have been released into the wild on Australia's mainland 3,000 years after the feisty marsupials went extinct there, in what conservationists described on October 5 as a "historic" step. (Photo by Handout / Aussie Ark / AFP) / TO GO WITH AFP STORY Australia-environment-animal RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Aussie Ark" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS --- NO ARCHIVES ---
animals

After what’s believed to be thousands of years, there are once again wild Tasmanian devils on the Australian mainland, with 26 reintroduced so far in the Barrington Tops National Park, NSW

Hi-tech fake eggs helping solve sea turtle crime

Green turtle. Picture: iStock.
technology

Scientists have used 3D-printed fake eggs containing GPS trackers to follow sea turtle eggs stolen from nests by poachers. All seven sea turtle species are listed as threatened and every egg matters

Calling all birders for big citizen science event

Bird - Fairy Wren in Song
science

It’s time for Australia’s largest citizen science event, the Aussie Backyard Bird Count. Last year, 88,000 people spotted almost 3.4 million birds in the annual avian survey. What birds can you see?

All the action of the famous peregrine falcon family

Screenshot of a peregrine falcon sitting with its chicks. Picture: 367collinsfalcons.com.au
animals

Three peregrine falcon chicks have hatched in a nest on the side of a Melbourne skyscraper. The birds are the stars of a live webcam watched by thousands of people around the world

Bear back on duty for bushfire season

***EMBARGOED FOR FEB 26 NEWS USE ONLY***

Bear, the rescue and recovery dog as he searched for injured koalas in the wake of the Black Summer bushfires. Picture: Supplied/Foxtel
animals

This summer, Australian scientists will use a crew of sniffer dogs led by Bear, a border collie and Australian cattle dog cross, to find and rescue any koalas in danger from bushfires

What will you name the sea-lion pup?

****EMBARGOED UNTIL TUESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER****
Taronga Zoo welcome the arrival of a female Australian Sea Lion pup born on July 29 to mum Nala, pictured getting used to the surroundings before being introduced to the public. Picture: Toby Zerna
animals

Zookeepers need your help to name a very special endangered Australian sea-lion pup who made her first public splash this week. Fewer than 25 pups are born in the wild each year

Alligator-squeak research wins big science prize

3 year old Mississippi alligator.  She can live to over 100 years and grow to 4 metres.
science

Scientists have won an international prize for research intended to make you laugh — and then think — for testing whether an alligator that breathes in helium squeaks like Minnie Mouse

How do bees make honey?

Close-up of a honey bee for Cameron England SAWeekend story. Picture: iStock
explainers

It’s spring! Plants everywhere are springing to life and flowering after winter. Bees are pretty excited, too, because flowers are vital for honey making. Kids News researched how bees make honey

Tiny patients a big challenge for zoo vets

Melbourne Zoo - white-lipped tree frog surgery. For Kids News
animals

How do you operate on a fish out of water or find surgical instruments small enough to use on a tiny frog? Vets at Melbourne Zoo know how

T-rex called Stan sells for more than $44 million

A Tyrannosaurus rex (T-Rex) skeleton, named STAN is on display during a press preview at Christie's Rockefeller Center on September 15, 2020 in New York City. - The skeleton of a 40-foot (12-meter) dinosaur nicknamed "Stan", one of the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex specimens ever found, will be auctioned in New York next month and could set a record for a sale of its kind. Discovered in 1987 near Buffalo, South Dakota, the 188-bone skeleton took more than three years to excavate and reconstruct by paleontologists from the state's Black Hills Geological Research Institute, where it has been exhibited since. (Photo by Angela Weiss / AFP)
history

UPDATED Stan weighed more than 6 tonnes and had eyes the size of baseballs. His bite could have crushed a car. And this famous Tyrannosaurus rex has been sold for more than $44 million

Meet the comedians in the animal kingdom

Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Image Finalists 2020 - Photo by Tim Hearn. Caption: Hide and Seek. Animal: Azure Damselfly. Location: Devon, UK.
animals

We won’t ever know if these animals are trying to be funny but we do know they’re giving us lots of laughs. Meet the stars of the finalist entries in the 2020 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Very rare ‘walking’ scorpion fish spotted on Reef

Scientists have viewed the deepest regions of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park
science

On an expedition by a robot to the depths of the Great Barrier Reef, scientists have found new species of black coral, sponges and a rare and awkward-looking “walking” scorpion fish

Tassie devil relative returns from extinction

nationally threatened mulgara  at Ethabuka Reserve. Brian Williams story.
animals

This tiny carnivorous marsupial was thought to be wiped out in NSW a century ago, but now scientists have reintroduce a small population of mulgaras back into the wild

World’s loneliest elephant free to find friends

Veterinarians of Four Paws International, examine and take blood samples from Kavaan, the elephant slated to be moved to a sanctuary in Cambodia after it became the subject of a high-profile rights campaign backed by music star Cher, at the Marghazar Zoo, in Islamabad on September 4, 2020. (Photo by Aamir QURESHI / AFP)
animals

An elephant famous for being called the ‘world’s loneliest’ has been cleared by vets to leave the Pakistani zoo where he has lived in terrible conditions for more than 35 years

Inside the shark tank at Sea Life Aquarium

BOND MELBOURNE : for Peter Rolfe story   ..  10/08/2011 NEWS: 10/08/2011 NEWS: Feeding time at the Melbourne Aquarium. Senior diver Kate McKay feeds Mitch the grey nurse shark. Pic. Jay Town Pic. Jay Town
animals

They might look scary but few sharks deserve their fearsome reputation, according to aquarist James Gilbert. In fact, some need our help to survive on National Threatened Species Day.

T-rex maybe not so mighty after all

The new estimate is far smaller than the size of the T-Rex portrayed in the Jurassic Park films Credit: �2018 UNIVERSAL CITY STUDIOS PRODUCTIONS LLLP AND AMBLIN ENTERTAINMENT, INC
animals

An international team of scientists — led by a palaeontologist at the University of New England in New South Wales — have re-examined 100 years of dinosaur research to look afresh at T-rex

Two giant pythons drop in for a visit

In this photo provided by Steven Brown, a snake slithers out the door of a home at Laceys Creek, Australia, Monday, Aug. 31, 2020. David Tait returned home and was surprised to discover that his kitchen ceiling had collapsed under the weight of two large pythons apparently fighting over a mate. (Steven Brown/Brisbane North Snake Catchers and Relocation via AP)
animals

A Queensland man came home to a collapsed kitchen ceiling and two massive snakes making themselves comfortable elsewhere in the house. Kids News looks at how to keep safe around snakes

World waits for peregrine falcon eggs to hatch

A peregrine falcon living on the edge of a Melbourne skyrise building has hatched an egg.. Frame grab from 367 Collins Street Falcons Live Stream
animals

Via a live webcam, the eyes of the world are on a peregrine falcon nesting on the side of a Melbourne skyscraper who has laid at least three eggs, which are expected to hatch in about 32 days

Nature’s fury and beauty captured in winning photos

7PM, 27TH AUGUST 2020 EMBARGO FOR ONLINE, EMBARGO FOR PRINT 28TH AUGUST 2020, PREMIUM NETWORK CONTENT, NO AUSTRALIAN, NO NEWS.COM, NO SKY, NO WEST AUS, *ONLY FOR NEWS CORP MASTHEAD PAPERS*,  Overall Winner (originally Landscape) Ben Blanche.
A fire caused by a lightning strike in Mount Barney National Park.
It slowly marched over the peak as it moved around the border area of Queensland and New South Wales.
arts

A snap of a Black Summer bushfire has been named Australia’s best nature photograph in a competition that celebrates the country’s wild side

Big welcome for endangered baby animals

Kala with her newborn infant gorilla. Picture: Bristol ZooSource:Supplied
animals

Zookeepers announce the arrival of a baby critically endangered western lowland gorilla, twin golden lion tamarins and a giant panda as big as a chocolate bar in a great week for conservation

Animals with superpowers need your help

Finley (11) and Cohen (9) Howland playing the ANiMOZ Trading Card Game with Kinta the Quokka on August 11, 2020 at the Adelaide Zoo. Picture Matt Turner.
animals

Did you know that Australia’s critically endangered animals each have a superpower? Nominate your favourite animal to appear on a trading card that could help save them from extinction

Is my pet happy, angry, scared or sad?

Tabby  and white cat and Happy Border Collie crossbreed dog with smiling expression looking at camera. picture iStock
technology

In a first for animals, researchers in Australia have invented an app that uses AI to tell you what breed your dog or cat is and how it is feeling — happy, angry, neutral, sad and scared

Winning photos focus on wonders of science

2020 Beaker Street Science Photo Prize finalists. Tasmanian devil joeys being checked by researcher in mothers pouch.Picture: Heath Holden
science

An image of tiny Tasmanian devil joeys inside their mother’s pouch is a finalist in a photo competition shining a light on the importance of science for National Science Week

Meet ‘terror croc’ with banana-sized teeth

Illustration of Deinosuchus catching prey Credit: GETTY IMAGES - GETTY
animals

Deinosuchus was a giant reptile that terrorised dinosaurs that came to the water’s edge to drink, according to a new study of fossils that also uncovered a third species of these scary beasts

Penguin poop images from space reveal new Antarctic colonies

The smudges on the ice show the existence of an emperor penguin colony. Image taken from the European Commission’s Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite
animals

New satellite images of emperor penguin droppings have revealed a surprising number of colonies in Antarctica, where the flightless birds are under threat from global warming

Plastic waste found in seafood

Francisca Ribeiro and her team of UQ researchers discovers alarming levels of microplastic in seafood.
environment

Researchers have discovered alarming levels of microplastics in sardines, prawns, oysters and crabs

Australia’s famous tree-kangaroo becomes a dad

Nupela gave birth earlier this year on 4 February and her care team witnessed the baby crawl into the safety of mum’s pouch. Although a first-time mother, Nupela is a natural and her instincts see her regularly cleaning her pouch and grooming her little one who is growing fast. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE
animals

Makaia, an endangered Goodfellow’s tree-kangaroo, made news as a tiny orphaned joey when he was kept alive in the pouch of another species. He’s now all grown up and has become a dad

Lump on leg shows dinosaurs got cancer

Centrosaurus dinosaur, bones from which are being excavated live at the Australian Museum in Sydney.
science

It’s tempting to think of dinosaurs as supernatural or mythical beasts but we now know for sure they were affected by many of the same diseases as humans and other animals, including cancer

Aussie giraffe takes world height record

Australia Zoo giraffe, Forest, has officially made it into the Guinness World Records for being the tallest living giraffe. Photo: Australia Zoo
animals

After a tricky time measuring him, a 12-year-old giraffe called Forest – who lives at Australia Zoo in Queensland – has been confirmed as the world’s tallest giraffe, standing at 5.7m

Aussie dogs to train as pandemic sniffer force

University of Adelaide researchers Dr Anne-Lise Chaber and Dr Susan Hazel with a pet dog (black labrador), which is one of the breeds that will be trained to sniff out COVID-19 in people.
health

The first COVID-sniffing dogs could be on patrol in airports, hospitals or quarantine within months as Australian scientists work to deploy puppy power in the hunt for unidentified patients

Reindeer herders find woolly mammoth

In this handout released by Governor of Yamalo-Nenets region Press Office, people carry a mammoth bone fragment in the Pechevalavato Lake in the Yamalo-Nenets region, Russia, Wednesday, July 22, 2020. Fragments of a mammoth skeleton have been found by local reindeer herders in the lake a few days ago, and scientists hope to retrieve the entire skeleton - a rare find that could help deepen the knowledge about mammoths that have died out around 10,000 years ago. (Artem Cheremisov/Governor of Yamalo-Nenets region of Russia Press Office via AP)
animals

Scientists are working to retrieve the skeleton of a woolly mammoth from the shallows of a lake in northern Siberia where reindeer herders discovered it in recent days

Hole in dam wall saves epic eel journey

P1290288
environment

Eels in Tasmania can now swim through a hole drilled in a dam wall to help them begin their incredible 3000km migration north to breeding grounds in the Coral Sea around New Caledonia

Zoo welcomes southern white rhino calf

Monarto Safari Park is celebrating the safe arrival of an incredibly cute newborn rhino calf. , Mum Umqali gave birth to the youngster on Wednesday  at 7.10pm within one of the Boma. Picture: Geoff Brooks/ZoosSA
animals

Umqali the southern white rhino has given birth to a healthy calf at Monarto Safari Park in South Australia in great news for the efforts to save the species from extinction

Plan to save Australian honey bees

Generic image of a Australian native honey bee seen at Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney, with news scientists have worked out how bees fly.
technology

New Aussie technology could halt one of the 21st century’s most troubling trends: the sudden decline in bee populations around the world

Bushfires threaten 49 Australian species

Embargoed for The Sunday Telegraph. Speak to the pictured desk before use.  Aussie Ark in the Barrington Tops is NSW’s largest independently owned and operated conservation organisation and is home to seven keystone species once found in the region. It's aim is to establish a robust insurance population of Australian threatened, native mammal species such as the Tasmanian devil, Eastern quoll and long-nosed potoroo, suitable for semi-wild release into large, predator proof fenced sanctuaries in the Barrington Tops, for eventual reintroduction to the wild.
animals

Scientists are just beginning to understand how the bushfires devastated populations of native animals. See the full list of species that are now – suddenly – under threat

Dog becomes essential worker during pandemic

Eros carries a basket of bread from the El Porvenir mini-market as he makes a delivery on his own in Medellin, Colombia, Tuesday, July 7, 2020. The eight-year-old chocolate Labrador remembers the names of customers who have previously rewarded him with treats, and with some practice, he has learned to go to their houses on his own. “He helps us to maintain social distancing,” said Eros’ owner Maria Natividad Botero, amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (AP Photo/Luis Benavides)
animals

A chocolate Labrador has been doing an important job to help people stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, delivering food in a straw basket around his neighbourhood

Big bird flies without flapping

In this undated photo provided by Alvaro Moya Riffo in July 2020, an Andean condor soars above the Patagonian steppe in Argentina. For the first time, a team of scientists strapped recording equipment they called “daily diaries” to eight condors in Patagonia, to record each wingbeat over more than 250 hours of flight time. Incredibly, the birds spent just 1% of their time aloft flapping their wings, mostly during take-off. One bird flew more than five hours, covering more than 100 miles (160 km), without flapping its wings. (Alvaro Moya Riffo via AP)
animals

Scientists have observed an Andean condor — the world’s largest soaring bird — riding air currents to fly more than 160km over five hours without flapping its wings

There’s a huge dinosaur in my kitchen

Generic dinosaur illustrations, tyrannosaurus rex.
technology

Google has a new feature that lets you view lifelike dinosaurs wherever you are through a smartphone camera with 3D augmented reality technology that works like Pokemon Go

Calls to better protect world-famous giant cuttlefish site

Giant Australian Cuttlefish aggregation  off the coast of Whyalla in the Spencer Gulf  - picture Scott Portelli
animals

Pressure is mounting on the SA government to reverse a decision allowing fishing of giant cuttlefish in the Spencer Gulf, where they mass each year to spawn, the only place in the world this happens

Scientists rethink ancient wombat in new study

A supplied image shows an artist's reconstruction of a giant wombat-like marsupial Mukupirna nambensis. The unique remains of a prehistoric, giant wombat-like marsupial –Mukupirna nambensis –  that was unearthed in central Australia are so different from all other previously known extinct animals that it has been placed in a whole new family of marsupials. (AAP Image/Supplied by Peter Schouten) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
animals

A giant wombat the size of a black bear that roamed Australia 25 million years ago has been classified as a new category of marsupial after almost 50 years of study

Huge outback station to become national park

This undated handout from the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Services released on June 27, 2020 shows a grey grasswren at Narriearra Station, a 153,415-hectare (379,000 acres) property in Australia's far northwest New South Wales. - A slice of Australian outback almost the size of greater London will be turned into a national park to help protect threatened species after authorities bought the land on June 27, 2020. (Photo by Jeff HARDY / NSW NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICES / AFP) / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NSW NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICES/JEFF HARDY " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  - NO ARCHIVE
environment

The NSW government has bought more than 1500 square kilometres of the state for a new national park to protect 25 threatened animal species and important habitat

Could this be the Loch Ness monster?

Steve Challice's photo at Loch Ness sparked speculation of the famous Loch Ness monster. Picture: Steve ChalliceSource:Facebook
animals

A tourist’s accidental photo of a strange aquatic creature about 2.5m long has sparked new excitement about Scotland’s Loch Ness monster, the mysterious creature people love wondering about

Giant meat-eating dinosaur roamed Australia

animals

Move over T-rex, Gigantosaurus and Spinosaurus — the discovery of dinosaur footprint fossils in Queensland reveal Australia had its own huge predator in the Jurassic Period.

Endangered dunnart found alive after fires

animals

A tiny, critically endangered marsupial has amazed conservationists on Kangaroo Island, after being spotted scampering in bushland destroyed in bushfires

Sheet-weaver spider swarm spins huge web

Ostearius melanopygius sheet-weaver spider webs at Lochiel Park, Campbelltown. Source: by Rusty Ryder
animals

Thousands of spiders are busily creating a rare natural silk sculpture in an Adelaide park. The social sheet-weaver spiders are working together like a community of ants to trap their prey

Found: dinosaur’s tummy full of food

The Cretaceous Period armoured dinosaur Borealopelta markmitchelli, which lived 110 million years ago in what is now the Canadian province of Alberta, eats ferns in an illustration released on June 2, 2020. Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology/Julius Csotonyi/Handout via REUTERS
animals

For the first time, scientists have found a beautifully preserved, fossilised meal inside the skeleton of a dinosaur, including fern fronds and spores, leaves and even charcoal from a bushfire

Happy day as Bear the turtle swims home

Sea Life Sydney welcome three turtles to the Darling Harbour aquarium for the first time after the closure of Manly Sea Life Sanctuary. Green Sea Turtle Myrtle was rescued Sea Life in 2013 and has been fitted with metal plates to help her swim following a boat accident that left her with cracks in her shell. Supplied
animals

Carers at a Queensland aquarium waved a happy goodbye this week to a precious green sea turtle, who swam back to freedom after recovering in captivity from injury

The mystery of sea creatures’ snot palaces

This 2002 photo provided by the Monterrey Bay Aquarium Research Institute shows a close up view of a "giant larvacean" and its "inner house" - a mucus filter that the animal uses to collect food. The creature, usually three to ten centimeters (about one to four inches) in length, builds a huge mucous structure that functions as an elaborate feeding apparatus, guiding food particles into the animal's mouth. When the filters get clogged, the larvacean abandons them. The abandoned filters sink toward the seafloor, and become an important food source for other marine animals. (MBARI via AP)
science

Learning how sea creatures build the equivalent of five-story palaces in about an hour, made just with mucus from their heads, could help us build expanding homes on Earth, the Moon or Mars

Coral transplants to boost reef health

Emma Camp, Project area: Australia. Reef recovery: pioneering new hope for the world's fast-vanishing corals
environment

Divers are using the quiet pandemic period to grow and replant coral at popular tourist diving and snorkelling spots on the Great Barrier Reef.

Burnt koalas heal with Phillip Island penguins

Ranger Jess McKelson. For Kids News and Hibernation
environment

Phillip Island reopens on World Environment Day as Ranger Jess McKelson shares tales of bushfire koalas and little penguins

Checking cheetah poo at the zoo

Animals and their poo, for Chill section, Sunday Mail May 31, 2020.

Cheetah from Monarto Safari Park. Picture: Adrian Mann/Zoos SA
animals

One of the important roles of zookeepers, vets and scientists is looking at animal poo as an indicator of health. Monarto Safari Park keepers share some of their poo knowledge with Kids News

Australian megafauna died out with climate change

Megafauna , Billabong scene
environment

Giant kangaroos, enormous crocodiles, massive wombats and a marsupial “lion” that lived 40,000 years ago in tropical Northern Australia died out because of climate change, a study has found

Big boost to birdwing butterflies in the wild

The Richmond Birdwing Butterfly.
animals

A successful captive breeding and release program of more than 500 Richmond birdwing butterflies means the species could soon be taken off the threatened species list

Lonely penguins take day trip to art gallery

Lonely Peruvian penguins from the Kansas City Zoo enjoy an outing to the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art to lift their spirits during the coronavirus lockdown. Picture: Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
animals

Life in lockdown can be pretty dull, even for penguins. But the day got a light brighter for these little birds when they had an excursion from their zoo enclosure to an art museum.

Last-known film of not-so-fierce thylacine

Still from newly discovered footage of the thylacine in Hobart's Beaumaris Zoo in 1935. It was part of a tourism film made by Sidney Cook in 1935. (National Film and Sound Archives)
animals

Researchers have discovered what is thought to be the last film of a thylacine, taken two years later than any other known record and casting doubt on its reputation as an aggressive animal

Rare dinosaur fossil found in Australia

Eric the Elaphrosaurine (Reduced) Ruairidh Duncan 2020
animals

A fresh look at a fossil found at a Victorian beach and thought to belong to a pterosaur has resulted in the discovery of the first elaphrosaur dinosaur ever from Australia

Isolation baby boom for Australian zoos

Tree Kangaroo joey Chimbu exploring with mum Mani
Healesville Sanctuary. Picture: Zoos Victoria
animals

While the world has been in lockdown, zoos around the country have been welcoming a wave of cute, cuddly and not so cuddly babies. Check them out.

Ball of cuteness and other winning nature photos

Mountain Hare Lepus timidus A confiding adult, high in the Cairngorms mountains, forms the shape of a ball as it grooms Cairngorms National Park, Scotland, UK
arts

A photo of a mountain hare in a snowstorm that took the photographer several freezing weeks to capture has won this year’s BigPicture international nature photography competition

All the action of the great Aussie penguin race

Phillip Island Penguin Parade
Photo courtesy Visit Victoria
just for fun

A famous UK sports commentator in lockdown at home has narrated Phillip ­Island’s penguin parade 17,000km away to make up for the lack of live sports events

Mystery of koala drinking habits solved

A supplied image obtained on Saturday, May 2, 2020, of a wild koala licking a tree after rain. A study published today in Ethology, led by a researcher from The University of Sydney, has captured koala drinking behaviour in the wild for the first time. (AAP Image/Supplied by The University of Sydney) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
animals

In a big win in the battle to save this species from extinction, scientists have observed koalas drinking in the wild for the first time, watching them lick rain running down tree trunks

Scientists find otters juggle stones when hungry

READER PIC. This is a photo i took Sunday 26/07/2015 of a young otter juggling rocks at Adelaide Zoo. Photo from Madelaine Bleckly. Email madelainebleckly@gmail.com
animals

It looks like they’re just having a bit of fun, but new research has found that juggling stones is a sign that an otter’s tummy is rumbling and they’re ready for a feed

River ‘monster’ to topple T-rex as top dinosaur

This is an artist's illustration of the terrifying creatureCredit: University of Portsmouth / Davide Bonadonna
animals

Fast, ferocious Spinosaurus is the first aquatic dinosaur known to science. Experts believe it could topple T-rex to take the title as the most famous and exciting meat-eating dinosaur

Sea turtles thrive as humans stay off our beaches

ESCAPE:  Close-up of baby olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea), also known as the Pacific ridley, on beach sand. Selective focus on baby turtle. Picture: Istock
animals

Sea turtles are nesting in record numbers across the world as humans stay inside to stop the spread of COVID-19. The turtles are thriving with crowd-free beaches and less pollution

‘Crazy beast’ prehistoric mammal found

The Adalatherium was a bizarre creature that lived around 66 million
 years ago on the island of Madagascar. Picture: Facebook/Denver Museum of
 Nature & Science
animals

The skeleton of a backward-toothed mammal nicknamed “crazy beast” that existed alongside dinosaurs 66 million years ago has been unveiled by Australian palaeontologists

Dolphins dance through glowing algal bloom

Glowing dolphins swim through algae
science

A pod of dolphins has been filmed dancing and surfing through waves full of bioluminescent plankton. Kids News looks at the science behind the living things that glow

Found! Antarctic frog fossils from warmer times

Dr Jodi Rowley with James Alcock
animals

Experts have discovered cold-blooded frogs once lived on a warm Antarctica 40 million years ago PLUS Australian scientists need your help for a frog-finding mission closer to home

Earth’s insect numbers shrink over 30 years

Funny laughing curly girl with a butterfly on his nose. Healthy smile with white teeth. Free breathing concept.
animals

New scientific research has shown the number of insects living on land has fallen dramatically in the past 30 years, putting the world’s ecosystems — and human lives — at risk

How flamingoes hang out with their friends

ESCAPE: COVER OPTION - WING IT  ..  Flamingo near Bogoria Lake, Kenya. Picture: iStock
animals

Despite being part of a large flock, flamingoes mostly spend time with a small group of close friends and others avoid certain individuals, suggesting some just don’t get along

Virtual safaris into the wild, from home

***DO NOT USE *** RESERVED FOR HIBERNATION
Adorable Phoenix the lion cub at Mogo Wildlife Park. Picture: Supplied/ Chad Staples
animals

Zoos and wildlife parks across the country have risen to the COVID-19 challenge with livestreams from inside animal enclosures and broadcasting feedings, tours, talks and shows

Koalas at risk as numbers halve in 20 years

Poppy is the daughter of the lovely Rusa, who is a wonderful mum but unfortunately isnÕt producing quite enough milk to support her growing baby.

To help Poppy along, she receives a milk feed twice a day from Keeper Karen (in this video) or our head vet, Dr. Galit.

Being little Miss Independent, Poppy likes to try and hold the syringe to feed herself. If it wasnÕt for Keeper Karen steadying the pace, she would eat way too much before she realises her tummy is full!
animals

Australia’s koala population has been cut in half in the past two decades, with conservationists warning our national icon is already extinct in some areas after devastating bushfires and drought

Procession of caterpillars sign of frosty time ahead

The procession of caterpillars. Picture: Still from video
animals

A 7m-long procession of caterpillars parading through Alice Springs is fascinating and touching them dangerous, but to the Arrernte people, it can be a sign of a harsh winter on the way

Massive stringy clone colony filmed off WA

the siphonophore found off WA
animals

Researchers off WA have filmed a long, glowing, stringlike, predatory underwater creature made up of millions of interconnected clones, the largest of its type ever discovered

Wild beasts come out to play as humans stay in

LLANDUDNO, WALES - MARCH 31: Mountain goats roam the streets of LLandudno on March 31, 2020 in Llandudno, Wales. The goats normally live on the rocky Great Orme but are occasional visitors to the seaside town, but a local councillor told the BBC that the herd was drawn this time by the lack of people and tourists due to the COVID-19 outbreak and quarantine measures. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
animals

Wild animals including jaguars, goats and boars have started exploring quiet city streets across the world as humans stay inside during the coronavirus lockdown

‘Spider-Man’ identifies seven new peacock spiders

Maratus consteallatus. Picture: Joseph Schubert/Museums Victoria
animals

They’re the hit spiders of the internet, with their fancy colouring and cool courtship dancing. And now there are seven new peacock spider species to get to know

Take a virtual tour around the world

Walk the Great Wall of China without moving a muscle. PHOTO: Istock
technology

Visit the Great Wall of China, see the Mona Lisa or watch zoo animals without leaving home. Here are 10 top virtual experiences plus one very special out-of-this-world tour

Why do grey seals clap like humans?

Wild grey seal. Picture: Ben Burville
animals

Amazing video captured by a marine biologist after 17 years of waiting shows breeding grey seals clapping at each other underwater to warn off competitors and attract mates

Keeping tigers happy without visitors

HOLD COURIER MAIL EMBARGO MONDAY 30TH MARCH Dreamworlds Tiger Island manager Patrick Martin-Vegue and other handlers with the tigers who are now some of the only ones left at the park since it has shut. 
Picture: NIGEL HALLETT
animals

A small team of wildlife carers in Queensland is spending the COVID-19 disruption playing and swimming with tigers to keep the animals happy and prevent them from becoming lonely

Scar found on fossil of feisty dinosaur with feathers

An artist’s reconstruction of three Dineobellator, in foreground, with other dinosaur species at the end of the Cretaceous Period in New Mexico.
animals

Scientists have unearthed the fossils of a fearsome feathered dinosaur with sharp claws and a telltale scar. It lived 67 million years ago and proves dinosaurs continued to evolve until their end

Baby boom for endangered snapping turtles

Taronga Zoo have had success breeding the critically endangered Bellinger River Snapping Turtle, a species that was almost wiped out by a disease in 2015. This year over 35 babies have hatched in their breeding facility. Picture: Toby Zerna
animals

The future of Australia’s critically endangered Bellinger River snapping turtle is a little more secure after 35 baby turtles hatched at Taronga Zoo

Twin polar bear cubs venture out in empty zoo

In this image released by Ouwehands Zoo Rhenen on Wednesday March 18, 2020, a pair of polar bear twins make their public debut at a Dutch zoo, without public because of coronavirus restrictions. The two youngsters cautiously ventured out of the maternity den at the Ouwehands Zoo on Wednesday morning, sticking close to their mother, called Freedom, as they explored their outdoor enclosure for the first time since they were born on Nov. 27.  (Tonny Hoevers, Ouwehands Zoo Rhenen via AP)
animals

Three-and-a-half-month-old twin polar bear cubs have made their public debut at a zoo in the Netherlands, but without the public because of coronavirus restrictions

Fish with fingers shows how human hand evolved

Artists reconstruction of an ancient *Elpistostege*
fish fossil found in Miguasha, Canada, which has revealed new insights into how the human hand evolved from fish fins. Research involving Flinders University palaeontologist Professor John Long. Supplied. MUST CREDIT: Katrina
Kenny
animals

A slippery predator that lurked in lagoons 380 millions years ago had fins with finger bones that could teach us about the origins of the human hand

Early humans ‘ate no meat, swung in trees’

The Little Foot fossilised hominid skeleton is unveiled for the first time to the public at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg on December 6, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MUJAHID SAFODIEN
history

The careful scanning of a 3.6 million year old skull belonging to a fossil named ‘Little Foot’ has proven that early humans had small brains, swung between trees like monkeys and ate vegan diets